23andMe — Genetic Testing prior to TTC?

posted 3 years ago in TTC
Post # 3
Member
2243 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: January 2012

I was looking at their site & most of the information they would provide probably wouldn’t be fairly useful if you have a knowledge of your family history. My husband and I were both tested for Beta-Thalassemia trait before TTC since my father & sister are carriers.  They noted that 9/10 people don’t carry any of these genes. If you did, you’d probably have a heads up cause someone in your family does too.

Many generic diseases such as CF, sickle cell anemia & thalassemia manisest themselves even if you’re just a carrier, so you would also have suspicions I’d hold onto your 200$ & go talk to your Dr about your family history.

Post # 4
Member
10384 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

Your health insurance probably covers this – no need to pay full price for a kit.

We will be testing, primarily b/c my DH is an Ashkenazi Jew, and I am of Scandinavian decent. There’s quite a few more common genetic disorders shard between the two gene pools, so we want to know what odds we’re looking at going in so we know what to test for in utero.

Post # 5
Member
11668 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

I would get genetic testing through my doctor if you or your DH are at risk of being a carrier of something specific (e.g., both of you are Ashkenazi Jews).  Most of the time insurance will cover it.  

 

Post # 6
Member
295 posts
Helper bee

Me and my SO did it a couple years ago because of a special they were running. It provided me with decent information and would different recommend it. They are also always updating the findings even after 2 years of hqving it.

Post # 7
Member
3378 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

I HIGHLY recommend them.  My husband and I did this last year because I’d shown to have MTHFR mutations on RPL testing (but they only tested one part of it) and my RE’s refused to test the other main form or my husband.  This testing will tell you about several big clotting factors including MTHFR, Factor V Leiden, and prothrombin.  I’m a huge fan and when I bought it, it cost $250 EACH!!  lol Still totally worth it to me.

Post # 8
Member
362 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

I did it and it was really fun. I learned that I’m a CF carrier, and that I’m sensitive to blood thinners. Even if you generally know your genetic heritage, it’s still pretty cool because it’ll tell you further back than you may know (for ex, my birthparents told us we’re german, but this thing pinned us closer to Norway, which I think is pretty cool). It’ll also tell you what percentage neanderthal you are.

Post # 9
Member
264 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2015

I got it and it’s been so so informative! Though it doesnt change much, im a carrier for hemochromatosis. Some of our friends got it for free as google employees and found out they are both CF carriers even though they can’t recall a single incident in either family! they recently added a genetic offspring calculator where you can choose two parents and it will tell you the odds of the child haveing different traits, though this feature is mosty just for fun and not very informative. 

There are also different sites that are less user friendly that do very cool in depth stuff with the raw data you can get from your 23andme account

Post # 10
Member
3378 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

@craftylish:  Totally agree!  I did genetic genie, Promethease, the Livewello App, and Sterling’s spreadsheet (www.mthfrsupport.com).  lol I loved the different info that each gave.  Which ones did you do?

Post # 11
Member
525 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

I had never heard of this until now. Just ordered 2 kits for my DH and I!!

 

Post # 12
Member
528 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

I completely reccomend 23andme me ,my husband,my mom and brother have all gotten it done.. it is how i found out aboout my mthfr and that i didnt have factor v or prothrombin. Its worth it for only $99!! you can also reasearch your raw data by finding disorders through snpedia. I also do livewello and it gives a report on important methylation disorders and immune factors that are crucial to carrying a baby.

Post # 13
Member
341 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

@MrsEdamame:  We both did and love it. Insurance it would of been over the $100 price tag. We were not sure about my future hubby’s mother’s origin as she was adopted but thought all along she was full blooded german. Well the test showed something differet. And now we are into trying to find his real grandparents. Its kinda fun. Interesting the future hubby showed in several sites that he is immune to HIV and malaria.

 

Post # 14
Member
1734 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 1998

If you have the money, I say go for it. If you have risk factors for certain conditions (i.e., Ashkenazi Jews and Tay Sachs, for example), I’d say it’s well worth the money.

I have no intention of testing. There are no known genetic disorders in our families. Thankfully, it’s been typical stuff – oh look, a 70-year-old relative had a heart attack. One of my grandparents had Alzheimer’s, but nothing immediately life-threatening. You can’t dodge all the bullets, but thankfully with modern science you may be able to dodge some.

But, I only think the tests are worthwhile if you intend to do something about it. When do you reach too great a risk to have children? If there’s a 50-50 shot your child could, say, have Tay Sachs, will you conceive anyway?

Post # 15
Member
1015 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

We did a series of blood tests with our RE’s office.  I found out I’m an SMA carrier, but happily DH is not.  They also found clotting issues, so I’m glad they determined that before my first IVF.  I’m now on a blood thinning protocol to lower my risk of miscarriage.

Post # 16
Member
3378 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

@CookieCreamCakes:  Ah but most of the genetic mutations out there are only potential for issues.  There are very few genetic mutations that guarantee a problem.  In addition to that, many genetic mutations can be mitigated or bypassed altogether with some willingness to change things up.  🙂  For me, totally worth it to know about.

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