(Closed) Adopting a big dog. Post #2 Question!?

posted 5 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
9143 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 2013 - St. Augustine Beach, FL

Every group has different standards for urgency.  I would say you need to call the individual shelter to determine why that animal is marked urgent unless it explains it in the animal’s description.  Additionally, some rescue groups will care for animals at shelters so the urgency is that the animal is reaching the expiration of time when the shelter will put the animal down.

Post # 4
Member
8464 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: April 2013

@Sweet.Sugar.Rose:  Honestly, if you adopt a dog from a rescue, it’s one more spot they can open up for an urgent dog at a high kill shelter.  If you adopt from a high kill shelter, it’s one less dog the rescues have to take on.  I adopted my dog from a high kill shelter, and he’s amazing.  I have volunteered for many rescue groups, and the benefit to adopting from those is that you get more support.  You can typically talk to the dog’s foster mom and know more about his/her personality.  The dogs in a rescue group are usually not at risk for being euthanized.

Post # 7
Member
3341 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

My brother-in-law and his family just adopted a sweet puppy they saw on petfinder. The puppy had been living in a foster home situation with other dogs. I would think that it is best to contact the shelter to determine what cases have the most urgency. Perhaps you can find a shelter listed near you so that you could meet a dog.

My next dog will definitely come from a rescue organization – my sister is always finding good rescue dogs to promote and she has a foster right now. I wish I could do that, but my husband has a strictly one dog mentality, perhaps because I tend to favor large dogs.

Post # 8
Member
251 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I work for the retired greyhounds trust and obviously ours is very different as we don’t kill unless they suffer a medical condition that is having a large impact on the dogs life. The dogs we try to flag are the ones who’ve been in the kennel for a year or more, ones who are over 5, ones with pre-existing medical conditions that will need special attention, ones who’ve been abused in a home or have been given up after a long period of time in a home, the list goes on really!

I know it’s very hard when you go into the shelter- but the most frustrating thing from our point of view is when people go straight to the fawns, the brindles and the blues- completely disregarding black and black and white dogs as boring. We have homed so many strikingly coloured dogs who are absolute horrors and often bounce a few times whilst good natured black males are left behind just because of their colour. There was one blue bitch who was returned and rehomed 8times in two months- a period in which we’d be lucky to home one black dog!

Post # 10
Member
251 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

@Sweet.Sugar.Rose:  all the best! You sound like a lovely person. Please post pics when he or she is settled in!

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