(Closed) Alterations on dresses that are too long??

posted 4 years ago in Dress
Post # 3
Member
45394 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

@thumpurr:  It depends on the edge detail of the dress. If there is detail you don’t want to lose on the hem of the dress, it is usually then taken apart at the waist and the skirt elevated there.

Post # 4
Member
5892 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2010

5″ should be easy for a good seamstress. Dont stress

Post # 5
Member
242 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

Can you post a picture pls so we can seewhat you mean 

Post # 6
Member
11227 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

@julies1949:  +1.

@thumpurr:  I would consult with a seamstress prior to making that purchase.  Because of the lace overlay, I don’t know that this dress can be shortened easily (or at all) from the waist, so it may be the case that all of the length will need to come from the bottom of the skirt, and there is such beautiful lace trim on ths dress.

Post # 7
Member
242 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

Sorry about last post. I just saw the link to the dress. It’s beautiful 

Post # 8
Member
1450 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

Those lace pieces are most likely appliques that the seamstress will have to pull up, one by one, and reattach at higher points on the skirt before shortening it.

The OP is probably not the first person who needed to shorten this gown. It probably won’t be cheap.

Post # 9
Member
3249 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2015

@thumpurr:  I’m a seamstress. It looks to me like the top layer of the entire dress is tulle, with lace patterns appliqued on. The dress does have a visible waist seam, which is good. 

Shortening the skirt would have to be done by taking it up at the waist (the lace edging on the skirt would be totally ruined if it was taken up at the hem), which would require a lot of work taking those appliques off and putting them back on.  For the shortening to work properly, I think the vertical seams of the skirt will probably have to be changed as well, so it flows nicely and fits into the bodice at the waist.

Other seamstresses may have different ways of dealing with this, but I would shorten it at the waist. That’s a fair amount of work– a few hundred dollars, probably. Actually, do you have a seamstress you go to regularly? If you do, show her the pictures and ask what she thinks of the possibilities, and how much she thinks she might charge.

Post # 11
Member
3249 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2015

@thumpurr:  Thanks for the better pictures! 

Now that I see larger and better photos of the dress, I think that if you don’t mind losing some of the slightly fancier lace decorations at the hem of the dress (those upside-down T-shaped things), all that would need to be done would be cutting a few inches off the hem. It looks like most of the skirt layers are unhemmed tulle.. . I’m sure there’s a lining that would need hemming, but the fact that the layers that show don’t need to be hemmed makes things easier and quicker. You may end up with some of the lace blobs on the skirt bottom being cut in half, unless they are appliques that can be taken off and put back on again after the fabric is cut (I cant tell if they are, but I would guess they’re part of the fabric). That would be the only problem with shortening this.

Shortening it is not going to be nearly as hard as I thought, as long as you don’t mind some of the lace pieces near the hem being cut through, or needing to be moved. If you are 100% sure you won’t mind these possibilities, go ahead and get it. Make sure you find a seamstress to alter it who is open to the idea of taking it up from the bottom, if you do, as taking the skirt up from the waist (as I imagine some might do) will be more expensive.

Post # 13
Member
1450 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@thumpurr:  

  • I don’t understand what you mean by the train being attached to a flower on the back.  To me, from the photos, it looks like the train is attached and gathered up to a point.  They use the flower as a way to decorate the point the train is gathered up in.  If the train is part of the skirt, it would be nearly impossible to make it a detachable train; there would need to be enough skirting material for the separate train, plus enough to finish the back of the skirt.  You’d potentially lose a lot of the fullness in the back.
  • it’s a lot of work to work with lace, which is why it’s more expensive to alter in general.  They have to take a seam ripper and take out the stitching that attaches each applique without harming the organza or netting that it’s on, move it, and then sew it back down.

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