am i allowed to have my baby in the US?

posted 3 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 3
Member
903 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

@newname_99:  You’re allowed in that no one can stop you–legally I mean.  I gues you’d just enter on a regular tourist visa and deliver here.  Do you have medical insurance and does it cover international stuff?  (I have insurance in the US and found out that they DO cover me in international locations, but there are a lot of hoops to jump through like an itemized bill translated into english and notarized, lots and lots of paperwork, etc.).  I

f not, a hospital birth in the US could be insanely expensive  (maybe 10,000 USD for a regular labor, lots more if there are any problems with you and baby) if you are paying cash.  AND you have the added “fun” of needing to research hospitals before labor–there are lots of hospitals in the US that will put you in a worse, shared room if you don’t have insurance at all. Even if you say you are willing to pay cash (because they are so used to people defaulting on their medical bills).

Have you researched a Midwife/birthing center option in the US instead? 

Personally, I would just plan to deliver in Monterrey.  Surely they’ll have someone on staff whose English is good enough to translate to you?  I grew up in Texas and had several friends from Monterrey and their English was perfect.

Post # 4
Member
822 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@newname_99:  Have you thought about maybe hiring a translator?  There are a lot of Americans who live in Monterrey, especially students or people who teach English.  And obviously people who live there and speak English but I’m sure the challenge is knowing that you will go into labor with that person there for sure.  Maybe you can hire someone to be on call for you.  Have you inquired at all in the hospital you work in?

Texas can be very expensive.  I’m not sure what the rules are there, but I know in CA we can’t turn anyone away for medical emergencies.  But, I would look into what it means to have your child in a country you don’t live in.  I don’t know exacty how it works but there are certain laws for people born in America and I have heard of random complications with some of those things.  It might be best to have your baby where you live.  Although I’m sure you’ve looked into that more than I have.

Good luck!!!

Post # 5
Member
11668 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

Technically, you can but it will cost you tons. I’d say no less than 10k for a normal vaginal delivery.

I think it would be much more feasible for you to hire a translater instead.

Post # 6
Member
2627 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

I found this article

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/birth-tourism-industry-markets-us-citizenship-abroad/story?id=10359956#.UcnKvfk3vcM

Its certainly possible you could run into trouble, like them turning you away at the border because you are “too pregnant” legal or not (there seems to be stories about this onlone), but once here you can have the baby. Just be prepared to pay a whole lotta $$.  I would call the hospital you think you want and ask what a birth would cost, without complications, if paying in cash. Also ask their policy on when it has to be paid. 

Post # 7
Member
3635 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

They won’t kick you out of the country when you go into labor.  Entering the country 3 weeks from giving birth might be the difficult part.  But having a child with dual citizenship would be a good bonus if you can pull it off. 🙂

Will cost you a fortune, though.  Like.. a fortune.  Then you have to get birth certificate and all that for baby to leave with you.  Can’t come in two and leave three without answering some questions, yanno? 

Also… right across the border you won’t find a whole lot of English, either. 

Post # 8
Member
4867 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

I ended up needing an emergency C-section, and it would have cost almost 30,000 if I didn’t have insurance. I’d look into some better options where you’re at – maybe a doula who can also act as a translator if it’s necessary? No hospital in the US can turn you away if yo show up in labor, but I can see you running into problems at the border,

Post # 9
Member
3889 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

@ThreeMeers:  This.

OP, with the current atmosphere surrounding immigration being highly charged and highly divisive, I would not recommend crossing the border from Mexico to the US while heavily pregnant. No matter your nationality, skin color or accent, that’s just a risk I think most would not want to take so close to delivery.  Hire a translator or find an English-speaking doctor in Mexico.  You could also consider hiring an American midwife to travel to Mexico (at your expense, I’d assume) to assist with the delivery.

Post # 10
Member
893 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2012

@newname_99:  you can…

but you migh. Be refused at the border because you are sooll pregnant. I am surprised you are having a hard time finding medical help in english in monterrey. What doctor is taking care of you what hospital?

I have a great doctor in Mexico city if interested. It will cost you around 12 000 to 20 000 do you have insurance? mine will cover birth almost anywere in the world. 

Post # 11
Member
3633 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

The costs will depend greatly on where you are. As with all medical procedures in America, the city/state you pick is a huge impact. For example, the cost of living where I am is very high and I think without insurance of any sort, the hospital I picked is estimated to be at $50k for an uncomplicated vaginal delivery. Given the figures other Bees are quoting you, you can tell there’s a huge difference already.

Post # 13
Member
3677 posts
Sugar bee

I think the PP who suggested a bilingual doula made a great suggestion. As far as whether you are “allowed” to have your baby in the US, the basic answer is, it’s impossible for any governing body to legislate a bodily process like birth and where it happens. You might get static crossing the border, but they can’t legally hold you just because you’re pregnant.

The financial concerns, though, are real – and, frankly, the US healthcare system has the worst rankings in the industrialized world on maternal and infant outcomes, according to recent reports by the UN and the WHO. Your concerns about having to give birth in a foreign language are legit, but I think you’ll end up with much better and more affordable care if you stay in Mexico and work with a bilingual support person. You might even look into the suggestion about hiring an American midwife (preferably bilingual) to come down and assist you. Bizarre as that seems, it still  might be cheaper than paying out-of-pocket for a hospital birth in the US.

ETA: I know that Monterrey has a pretty good university. That might be a place to start making inquiries about bilingual birth support?

Post # 14
Member
893 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2012

@newname_99:  I understand what you mean. My dentist my husband is french and he loves my dentist because they have long conversations in english. I will ask around for Monterrey.

 Who is your doctor now? Have you tried hospital Angeles? 

 

Post # 16
Member
3677 posts
Sugar bee

@newname_99:  Another good resource you might want to check out is Ina May’s Guide to Childbirth by Ina May Gaskin. It’s a really helpful book about the whole childbirth process. Ina May is very pro-midwife, and so if you end up working with a midwife and doula rather than being in the hospital, you will have a good idea of what it will be like.

Even if you do ultimately choose to (or need to) be in a hospital, a doula is still a *fabulous* idea (see this blog post by Rebecca Dekker at EvidenceBasedBirth.com for some reasons why) to help you deal emotionally with everything and, if necessary, assist you with communication.

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