(Closed) Annual Vet Visit – what to expect?

posted 5 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
5968 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2018

@oracle:  No biggie, they’ll weigh puppy, which for some reason blows every dog’s mind…it’s like…an inch off the floor…they still freak out when you get them to stand on it…anyway, after that they’ll check their teeth, feel their tummy and joints, check ears and eyes…mention anything that looks odd or out of the ordinary….rabies, distember, bordatella..those shots are pretty standard.

If your dog is doing anything out of the ordinary or odd, certainly mention it, ask if there’s any breed problems you can work on mitigating now, arthritis or cataracts…some of those things can be staved off with the right diet…

I keep an eye out for any services, shots or charges that just don’t make sense for our living situation…a vet once tried to get me to vaccinate my dogs for canine pneumonia…and I was like, “They NEVER leave the house…how are they going to catch that?”

Another wanted to charge me $1,600 to clean the greyhound’s teeth…the next vet I went to told me to avoid it at all costs, since he’s so old already and anesthesia with greyhounds can get pretty dangerous, he advised that if they were doing some other necessary surgery they would clean them, otherwise, avoid it at all costs for him!

So yeah, just use your best judgment, and don’t let them emotionally blackmail you into things that you don’t need or aren’t best for your baby.

 

Post # 4
Member
1359 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

I always bring treats in case the vet’s bowl is empty. It’s a lot easier to coax our dogs onto a scale. Plus, they will want to feel her abdomen, check her teeth and gums, give the necessary shots, and take her temperature, and it is much easier for them to do these things if you hold out a treat between your fingers so she can’t quite grab it from you. She’ll be preoccupied trying to get the treat instead of trying to wriggle away from the vet.

ETA: I also usually ask the vet to clip one of our dog’s nails. He’s very squeamish about his paws and he won’t let us do it at home, but the vet tech can usually get it done. If you have her nails clipped by a groomer anyway, you might want to ask the vet to take care of it and save yourself an extra trip to the groomer this month.

Post # 5
Member
4355 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

I agree with PP, definitely question and research anything they want to give your dog, some vets unfortunately push vaccines like crazy and some breeds are sensitive to over vaccination.

Besides that it should be basic and pretty quick as mentioned above.

Post # 7
Member
5968 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2018

@oracle:  You know I honestly don’t know?  It sounded amazingly expensive!  The other two dogs have perfect teeth, we have a lot of cow legs layin around the house for them to pick on…that works for us, and the hound…well, his teeth were bad when we got him, but he’s still got all of them, and I brush weekly, so that’s the best I can muster for him.

Post # 8
Member
2214 posts
Buzzing bee

@oracle:  My vet does teeth cleaning for $300, so no, I don’t think $1600 is normal. I live in an inexpensive part of the country, but I know that my parents, who live in Boston, never paid more than $500 for a teeth cleaning. 

Post # 9
Member
2515 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

i used to work at a vet and $1600 for a dental is not normal. usually the most expensive thing was the bloodwork and the anesthesia and estimates for the total ranged from $250- $600 (depending on size of pet- bigger needs more anesthesia). bloodwork is necessary to check for anything that could kill/seriously harm your pet if they’re put under anesthesia.
 

@oracle:  if your dog is going to dog parks, boarding facilities, grooming- she’ll need her bordatella vaccine. it prevents kennel cough. it’s a lot like the flu vaccine for humans and it doesn’t protect against all strains of kennel cough but boarding & grooming places will require her to have it. she’ll need her DHPP (for distemper) and i recommend the leptospirosis vaccine. lepto is found in standing water and i know my dog will drink from puddles so it’s best to be vaccinated for that. the rabies and DHPP should be 3 year vaccines. if they try to give you a 1 year, question it (unless she’s a puppy in which case they get a 1 year and then the 3 year). the vet will check her temp, eyes, ears, heart rate, teeth. they’ll ask you if she’s been urinating ok or if it’s been frequently, if her stools have looked normal. you can have them trim her nails while you’re there too.

Post # 11
Member
2515 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

@oracle:  you’re welcome!

Post # 13
Member
2515 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

@oracle:  glad to hear it went well and that you love your vet. that’s important! i still drive the 30-40 minutes to the vet i used to work at because i love my vet so much (and i trust the other doctors and vet techs).

The topic ‘Annual Vet Visit – what to expect?’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors