Any Bees able to answer some questions about Hypothyroidism?

posted 3 years ago in Wellness
Post # 3
Member
509 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

I have hypothyroidism.  You should be getting your T3/T4 levels checked also.  A lot of doctors only do the TSH but that doesn’t tell the whole story.

I can’t answer your questions about vitamins but in terms of exercise, I exercise 3-5 times a week.  I don’t do this because of the hypo but because I enjoy it.  I take synthroid so my hypothyroidism is under control.

And I eat whatever I want.  Nobody has ever told me I have to be on a different diet because of it.

Post # 4
Member
2992 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

I am borderline, which means I do not need to take prescribed medications at this point. B-12. Omega fatty acids, L-tyrosine (an amino acid taken on an empty stomach), selenium, vitamin D3, and potassium iodine (or iodide, I forget which at the moment and I am at work) helped me a LOT. All prescribed by my “wellness doctor” who specializes in anti-aging. I also avoid soy (horrible for those with thyroid conditions) and raw crucifer vegetables (broccoli and the like), although cooked ones are OK.

 

Oh and I exercise 5-7 times per week. Not for my hypothyroidism but because it makes me look and feel better.

 

 

 

Post # 6
Member
446 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2015

I have been diagnosed with hypothyroidism since I was 18 (31 now).  It can be a definite roller coaster ride.  I started seeing an endocrinologist a few years ago because my case was not being managed correctly by my primary care.  I highly recommend it especially if your levels tend to fluctuate.

 

1. Does anyone with Hypothyroidism have B-12 deficiency?


My doctor informed me that almost all hypothyroids cannot metabolize B-12 correctly.  I have not had to go onto supplements, but I have to take a daily multivitamin.

2. How much exercise do you do if you have Hypothyroidism?

I used to be bad at this, but I have made it a habit.  Exercise is good because it helps a) boost your non-existent metabolism and b) help keep the weight off/lose weight.  I tend to work out at least five days per week.  I started slowly, however.  Do not go crazy when you start or else there is a chance you might get hurt.

3. Are there any foods that I should be avoiding?

You are not supposed to eat raw cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower, bok choy).  There is an enzyme in these foods that hurt thyroids.  It is okay to eat them cooked.  (I am “naughty” every once in a while.  Honestly, I think you get yourself in trouble if you eat massive quantities.)  Also, you are supposed to avoid pure soy (edaname, soy-based veggie burgers, etc.).

4. Is Hypothyroidism an autoimmune disease?

There are different kinds of hypothyroidism.  The most common type is an autoimmune disorder.  It can also be caused by issues with the pituitary gland or surgery.

 

I hope this helps!

Post # 7
Member
44 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: February 2014

@LoggerHead91207:  

I too have a family history of hypo & I was more or less recently diagnosed. I cannot answer the majority of your questions, but I’ll try:

1) Don’t know.

2) None… *sighs* Although I don’t believe not exercising has anything to do with developing hypothyroidism, but I could be wrong.

3) I read that for those of us taking medicine, soy counteracts the absorption of the components (in a -+4 hours span). So, I don’t eat soy and I suggested my mother to do the same. I don’t take cortisone either.

4) Not always, I can only think of Hashimoto’s, but it’s not always the case.

My Endo diagnosed me based on my TSH levels + T3/T4 levels. Even though the studies suggested I was borderline, my symptoms were keeping me on bed. Now I’m on levothyroxine and I feel so much better. I’m looking forward on giving natural thyroid medication a shot, but I still need to find an Endo that prescribes it to me (non first-world country here). Anyways…

I don’t know for sure if there’s anything you can do to avoid hypo :/ I’d not see an Endo unless you’re having symptoms, so I’d keep an eye on them! Good luck, I really hope you dodge this bullet!

Post # 8
Member
4215 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

I have hashi’s. I recommend speaking to a naturopathic dr about it. It made a big difference in managing it for me. Yes it’s autoimmune, yes it’s permanent and yes it sucks. All your doctor and endocrinologist are ever going to do is monitor your TSH, likely ignore tyroid antibody, T3 and T4 and basically wait untill your thyroid dies enough to Rx levothyroxine. I’ll be frank, I am not a big fan of the natural medicine approach in general, and I tried it after more than 10 years of getting no relief otherwise. It’s the only thing that ever gave me any relief. I’m very skeptical of pseudoscience stuff, but it has worked for me. 

Post # 9
Member
1629 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

I’m certainly no expert, but I was diagnosed with Graves’ disease, an autoimmune disease of the thyroid, last year and had my thyroid removed in December of last year.  As such, I am permanently on thyroid hormone replacement drugs and have spent the past year in a hypothyroid state as my medication levels were adjusted to the correct amount.  I will try to answer your questions as best I can!

1. I did some research and read something about there being a link between levels of Vitamin B-12 and the thyroid. My Doctor did bloodwork a few years ago and found that I had B-12 deficiency. He gave me a shot to start off with and then put me on sublingual tablets (I take 1,000 micrograms per day). He found that I didn’t have enough of a type of acid or substance in my stomach to help me break down or absorb the B-12. Does anyone with Hypothyroidism have B-12 deficiency?

I don’t have B-12 deficiency but I am Vitamin D deficient which I read is fairly common in people with hypothyroidism. 

2. How much exercise do you do if you have Hypothyroidism? I do my best to get to the gym, but sometimes it just doesn’t happen. I want to do what I can to try and keep this from progressing too much.

I don’t do much exercise to be honest, but I am super conscious of my diet now because I have learned first hand just how quickly one can gain weight with hypothyroidism.  I should exercise more and it would probably be beneficial to my energy levels, but I work and go to school full time so I don’t often have the time to do so.

3. Are there any foods that I should be avoiding? I know that there are links between the thyroid and autoimmune disorders (and that Hashimoto’s is the most common form of Hypothyroidism), but I don’t know if any foods contribute to it or not. I know that there is a link between autoimmune diseases and Hypothyroidism. I have been tested for Celiac Disease twice. First time my Doctor seemed hesitant to take me off the diet; second time he said I didn’t have it. Should I try to cut back a bit on the amount of Gluten containing foods I ingest and see if that helps make a difference?

I’ve read that you should avoid cruciferous vegetables like broccoli and Brussels sprouts as well as soy as they interfere with the production of thyroid hormones.  I don’t do either since I have no thyroid to produce any thyroid hormones, haha.

4. Is Hypothyroidism an autoimmune disease? I read that somewhere, but had never heard that before so I didn’t know if I should believe it.

The condition itself is not an autoimmune disease, but an autoimmune disease can cause the condition.  Hashimotos disease and Graves’ disease are the two autoimmune diseases that I am aware of off the top of my head that will affect thyroid production.

I go to see my Doctor for my 6 month check-in for my TSH levels next month. Are there any questions I should be asking him (and would the above ones make any sense to ask)? I really want to get to the bottom of why my levels are the way they are and make sure there are no complications or things that I should be watching for.

I would ask your doctor for a referral to an endocrinologist to be honest with you.  TSH testing alone is not going to give you a comprehensive view of what is going on with your thyroid.  Additionally, to be clear, if your TSH is low that means your thyroid levels are high.  TSH stands for thyroid stimulating hormone.  The lower your thyroid hormones T3 and T4 are, the higher your TSH will be.  The higher your T3 and T4, the lower your TSH will be.  TSH is what triggers your thyroid to either produce or cut back on producing thyroid hormones.

Post # 11
Member
4215 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

@LoggerHead91207:  If you have Hashi’s there’s nothing else that can be done. The gland stos working because your immune system attacks it. It’s not a “dead gland” persay, just mostly scar tissue and not really functional. There’s nothing a doctor can do to stop the immune system attack. That’s what autoimmune diseases do. Naturopathic dr’s claim to be able to slow down the damage or lessen it, or treat the condition afterwards. I only started trying those methods far after the onset of the disease, so I can’t say if they would really be effective in preventing it. 

Post # 12
Member
7664 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

I don’t know much about this, except that there is a link between hypothyroid and pernicious anaemia, which runs in my family. If you are having B12 problems, I would rule out pernicious anaemia, and make sure that you don’t have additional issues causing it.

Post # 13
Member
446 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2015

iOil am far from the worst with B12.  As long as I take my over the counter vitamin, I am fine.  It’s interesting how so many primary care doctors dismiss this disease.  When I started seeing my endo my life became more under control.

Post # 14
Member
44 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: February 2014

@LoggerHead91207:  I had all of those symptoms (still have but in a lower level, so to say), along with hair shedding, swollen ankles and some eyebrow hair loss at the tips. Don’t lose hope, but to be honest, it’s not THAT bad being hypothyroid… at least for me, I was relieved when diagnosed; I could finally take control of my life! (hoping to come back home after work to lie on bed and sleep isn’t particularly what I want my life to look like)

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