Any nurse midwives on the bee?

posted 3 years ago in Career
Post # 2
Member
42510 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

Do you think you would be comfortable and able to support the client in their choices in this line of work?

Post # 4
Member
1043 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

Oh i’m super duper jealous! midwifery is my dream job! I’m alittle to far into the game to switch now though =(<br /><br />From what I remember when I was looking it up, is that there are different types of midwives, some have gotten their accreditations through an apprentice-like program, some went to community college for theirs, and others are nurses who took post-grad courses to specialize.<br /><br />A few things about the specialty I noted on my obs/gyn rotations is that the hours are unpredictable, and often incredibly long and demanding. You have to be prepared to go 20-30 hours withought sleep or seeing family/friends/sunlight. Midwives (at least in Canada) are often not in good relationships with the nurses/doctors at the hospitals (not entirely sure why… but it seems most of the nurses/doctors on the wards cannot stand the midwives). You also have to be able to have teh insight to say “I cannot handle this, it’s time to get some specialist advice” for the sake of your client, while crushing your pride.

Pregnant women are LOVELY. I absolutely love doing prenatal clinics… women in labour…. not so lovely… and you really can’t blame them lol You will meet all kinds of women, some you won’t agree on their lifestyle/choices but you will have to suck it up and just try and educate them.

You will see heartwarming and heartbreaking moments, and you have to be able to go home, or on to the next client with a fresh head. It can be really hard sometimes. 

I don’t know about insurance for midwives, but for obs/gyn it is astronomical! i’m talking into the 6 digits a year… A Lot of women need someone to blame if their child isn’t perfect, and the person who delivered the kid is often the one to take the brunt of the blame. Sometimes it is within reason (ie a c section wasn’t called soon enough, an AROM was done when it wasn’t appropriate and led to infection or a prolapsed cord etc.) but sometimes its complete nonsense, and you have to be able to deal with it emotionally, psychologically and financially.

I would see if you can shadow an obs/gyn or midwife for a day to see if you think it’s you want to do.

Post # 5
Member
441 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

 

MrsUPS:  Hiya, what country are you living in? I just ask because midwifery in America is SO different to places like NZ (where I’m from). Here in NZ the majority of women are looked after by midwives. <br />I’m in training to become a midwife and it is the most incredible career in the world (to me). Its an incredible priviledge to be involved in a family’s life during the time of pregnancy, labour and postpartum. 

You definately need to leave all judgments at the door and be doing it for the right reasons- because you want to promote and protect women, their births and their babies. 

I would see if you could spend a couple of weeks with a midwife (not OBS/GYN as it’s very different) and get a feel for their role and lifestyle

Post # 6
Member
428 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2023

I don’t think I’d be very happy with a midwife who put breast feeding on the same level as exposing genitals or urinating in public. 

What if the women you work with want to bf in public without a cover? Will you support their choice? Or tell them that it’s inappropriate and selfish?

Post # 7
Member
641 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2015

 

Nellop:  Here in Australia, and I’m sure in the US, it is drummed into us that you put your personal opinions aside and provide the best treatment and care you can to the client. If you feel like your personal opinions are going to affect the quality of care you’re going to deliver, then you can always remove yourself from the situation (if you’ve got an understanding NUM) otherwise it is part of the nursing competency standards you are to adhere to as part of your registration. If we all thought like you, there would be no one left to take care of anyone in our hospitals, let alone mums who want to breastfeed in public.

Post # 9
Member
641 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2015

MrsUPS:  I wasn’t attacking you. I was saying that, in any case (mums who want to breastfeed, people who have done questionable things in their past, different ethnic backgrounds etc), if we all let our personal opinions get the better of us, then there wouldn’t be many people we’d treat and care for. As for breastfeeding, it doesn’t bother me; it was Nellop’s comment on it that seemed very arrogant and harsh and I was alluding to it in the last part of my comment.

Post # 11
Member
1044 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2013

MrsUPS:  Have you started nursing school yet? Most of my advice assumes you have not, but you can adapt as you see fit.

 My largest bit of advice to you is to get your nursing degree first- and figure out your future plans for education form there. Many areas are oversaturated with midwives, others are starving for them; some areas a midwife friendly, others make it very difficult to practice. Going to a good nursing school, and speaking with the insturctors may give you a better idea of the needs of your area. There is little use getting a degree which you will not be able to use to its full extent. I’m sure you would prefer not to have your CNM, and work as an RN in L & D. 

In addition, you may find you have additional interests in nursing, or may decide you want to get a dual masters. Keep an open mind when looking at possible areas of practice. You may decide you want to be a midwife and women’s health practitioner. I noticed that you said you have a good medical school in your area, but that does not mean they are a good nursing school, or that they offer many programs etc. Medicine and nursing are two very different specialties. 

Also, I’m not sure if you knew this, but soon the reguations in the US regarding nursing education will likely change. To practice as a midwife/NP you will be required to earn a DNP (Doctorate of Nursing Practice). This is unless you are grandfathered in, so be aware of that potential change.

P.S- Take “just a nurse” out of your vocabulary now. People should take pride in being nurses, not just nurses. 

Post # 13
Member
1044 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2013

MrsUPS:  Good for you! Sorry a lot of my advice seemed super basic, but as you know, people completely new to nursing are often really confused about what exactly nursing is.  So, do you plan on going for your BSN right away, or are you going to to go for your RN and then do an RN-MSN program. There are so many options for nursing, which is so great, especially since, if I remember right, you have children. It’s nice that things are so flexible

It is typical for the regulations to change, but it does mean a longer program, and more money; which changes things a little. Luckily some schools and hospitals offer grants etc.,

I know you didn’t mean “just a nurse” negatively. Correcting that statement is just a habit from nursing school, though, as you are aware, many people in the outside world do take it that way! Best of luck to you! I plan on getting my masters/doctorate in midwifery and global health if everything works out as planned. My dream is to do international work. 

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