Any other rock climber Bees?

posted 3 years ago in Fitness
Post # 4
Member
204 posts
Helper bee

@TwoStatesBride:  me!!! me!!

 

 

 

I’ve been climbing for almost 5 years now! Primarily a boulderer, and I love it! It’s definitely a lifestyle. During the winter (when it’s too cold to climb outside) I’m at the gym ~3 times a week and the rest of the year we climb as much as we can outside!

 

Post # 6
Member
204 posts
Helper bee

@TwoStatesBride:  Gym climbing is different from climbing outside but it’s still applicable. I would treat gym climbing as training for outside climbing. Much like you would compare treadmill running vs outdoor running. The concept is the same, but it is different!

Sometimes I think outside climbing is easier because you have more options. Instead of following specific holds/tape in a particular sequence, outside you can use a small crimp that not many people can hold onto, or a higher foot if you want. You do have to spend more time “figuring it out” though, but that’s half the fun!

I prefer to climb outside versus insdie, but we take trips specifically for climbing & it’s definitely our passion. My SO has been climbing for over ten years! Where do you live?

Haha, that’s fun – I would send a v3 and claim your prize! 😉

Post # 7
Member
231 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

DH and I climb! We only climb outdoors. We have enough of oun gear that we top rope alone when the weather is nice. We have taken a couple classes at Seneca Rocks in WV. I highly recommend it. We are not experts by any means but we enjoy it. We also haven’t climbed much in the past year since we’ve been so busy with work and the wedding (we are date twins, and I’ve read a lot of your posts!) and I hope we can climb more when it warms up again. I like that climbing is about partnership and trust! We love the time outdoors, too.

Post # 8
Member
2992 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

I used to be and hope to get back into it. However, I had to have my left hand reconstructed after a bad accident and my grip is only 30% of what it used to be. As a rock climber, you know how important that is! Plus I am nursing a torn rotator cuff. But I have not given up hope that SOMEDAY I will be able to climb again!

Post # 11
Member
6073 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

 @TwoStatesBride:  I am a climber!  It’s not my #1 hobby, but I go because H is into it.

H is a huge climber.  He’s summited the Grand Teton and surrounding peaks (this is Grand Teton National Park in Jackson Hole) numerous times (not with a guide, on his own with a friend).  People have asked him to be their lead if they have never been. 

It was my goal to climb the Grand Teton.  If you can do a 5.6 you can climb the Grand – but it’s like an 18 hour day as we would not do a bivvy.  Basically car to car in one push (no over night camping).  So I don’t think my endurance is up there yet!  I need to train more, plus the exposure factor is huge.  5.6 up there feels like 5.10 in a gym.  He took a couple of guys up there that had never climbed outside and the commented on how huge a 5.6 felt 7,000 feet up the mountain.  But these guys were ultra marathoners, otherwise he would not have taken them.

But H and I climb at City of Rocks in Idaho a lot, up Logan Canyon, UT near us.  We haven’t gone to the desert together, H has made a trip with friends – that’s usually 5.9 and above, and I’m not up there yet technically speaking.

ETA: I’ve climbed in a gym once, and it’s very different when outdoors.  You have wind, rain, bugs, heat, dirt to contend with (with always adds an element there).  Rock can be gritty or loose or full of bird shit LOL.  Features are not brightly colored or taped for you, you have to figure it out on the wall.  Plus the scenery is better outdoors I think.  Usually there is some hiking involved to get a to a wall.

This was an overhanging rappell so it was like lowering yourself over the unknown and then you eventually were just free hanging – no feet on the wall.  That one scary for me.

 

Post # 12
Member
6073 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

This was my first 5.9 attempt at City of Rocks in Idaho.  5.8 are usually doable for me, but 5.9 was like a jump harder.  I didn’t make it to the top.  It seems all the features just disappeared.  I wasn’t yet into crimping fingers and balacing on a single toe yet.

Post # 13
Member
425 posts
Helper bee

That’s such a fun hobby/sport! I do enjoy casual rock climbing, but I can’t say I’m very good at it.

Post # 14
Member
654 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

I’ve always wanted to try rock climbing, but I’ve been a tad scared. 

 

I do have, what I’m sure is a stupid question, regarding outdoor rock climbing. If you are doing top rope climbing, how do you get the anchor up at the top of the mountain to begin with?  Does someone have to go up with no rope at all to set it up? 

Post # 16
Member
6073 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

@ImagineDragon24:  You can do it a few ways.

1.  You can physically hike to the top of the climbing route to access the chains (or you set your own with gear).  So someone just hikes up the backside (if this is an option and guide books will let you know) and gets to the top chains.  The hiker puts the rope through the chains – usually there are two chains, one is a back up. If there are no chains they can set their own anchor with 2 or 3 cams and draws.  Then they hike down the way they came up or rappel themselves down to their group.

2.  Someone lead climbs.  Starting on the ground where the belayer is, they are roped in to the belayer.  They use quick draws (two biners on a draw) and clip into bolts or set their own gear (aka protection – they are called cams and nuts) along with clipping into their rope.  So technically they may climb 10 feet or so and if they fall they will fall down to the next bolt or protection.  But the rope has stretch so you will bounce a little, not a sudden jerk.  You just don’t want to fall before you reach the first bolt/protection. So you’re kind of spotting that person as if they were bouldering until they reach the first clip.

Trad climbing (or traditional climbing) is using your own gear or protection aka cams and nuts.  Sport climbing is using preset bolts on the wall that were drilled in by someone else.  We have a full rack of gear and then some, so trad climbing is typically the style we go.  Plus you can make up new routes.

Top ropes at a gym are typically all set up and don’t usually come down.

 

 

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