(Closed) any substitute teachers out there?

posted 7 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Hostess
11299 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

Hi I think I am. In the UK it’s called ‘supply teaching’.

It’s great in the fact that there’s no marking to do, no reports, no planning etc. I left my permanent job in the Summer due to the workload.

I like the flexibility and more of my life back but as yet it’s not bringing in enough money. On average i’ve had two days a week. But as more people start getting colds and flu etc I should be called in more between now and February – I hope.

Post # 4
Member
212 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I am a certified teacher that taught for two years in Memphis, TN.  My FI and I relocated back to the Chicago-area (where we are from) this summer and I have unfortunately not found a full-time teaching job.  Anyhow, I have been subbing this school year.  You would have to check with your district office to see how often you would get called.  I subbed for one year in Memphis while earning my teaching certificate and I was able to work about 3 days a week.  I am now subbing in two school districts… between the two, I am able to sub almost every day.

 

If you have any other questions, don’t hesitate to ask! 

Post # 5
Member
20 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: August 2010

I’m a regular teacher, but I know in San Diego they can’t even find enough subs for most days…so it’s pretty frequent, but the pay is not wonderful.  It’s a great way to get your face out there though for when you finally get your credential.  Our job market sucks right now…

Post # 6
Hostess
11299 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

@Mrs. Flip Flop:

San Diego hasn’t got enough sub teachers… Do you think they’ll pay for my flight from the UK to help out? lol

Post # 7
Member
290 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2010

I subbed for a year after college in a suburb of Richmond, VA. I was called fairly frequently. Once you do it a few times, you get a reputation and some teachers will request you. I had several regulars, which was nice since I knew the students.

If you are willing to sub any grade, that will increase your calls. I subbed k-12 and special ed and I worked at least 3 times a week, oftentimes more. Also, when I did it, it was a lot different from when I was in school. As a sub, I presented lesson plans, gave tests, etc. It wasn’t just popping in movies!

As a side note, subbing actually convinced me not to be a teacher. And not because the kids were awful. Wink I realized that to be a really good middle or high school teacher you have to be passionate about teaching & the subject area and I found myself more interested in the kids. Ended up going to law school to pursue child advocacy. I also learned that middle schoolers absolutely rock. Bad reputation, but those grades are truely the best.

Post # 8
Member
5093 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: January 2012

I taught for two years in Japan, and I’ve now applied to sub in the US, but the school district hasn’t gotten back to me yet.  I don’t know what the deal is.  🙁

Post # 9
Member
4547 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

I’m subbing right now until my full-time job starts in Jan. and I like it. Everything’s all prepared for you. Our school district uses an online website as well where you can go in and pick which job you want. I just got in on Wed. and I would have been able to sub all three days this week if I hadn’t had another obligation.

Post # 11
Member
2496 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: January 1991

I subbed last year and went through an agency instead of individual districts.  It was nice because I got one check, plus I was eligible for benefits from them.  The downside was that it was pretty inconsistent and not much money.  But, that was partially my own fault because I was really reluctant to take high school sub jobs.  I could do it while still living with my parents, but it’s not an option anymore because FI is still in school and I have to have a full time job.

I would go for it and see how you like it.  You have to be really flexible and like change.  You could be in kindergarten one day, 7th grade the next, special ed the next, etc.  Also, once you find districts that you like working in, try to stick with them as much as you can and they’ll call you more often and you’ll become a “preferred sub” or whatever term they use.  That puts you in a better position for a job with that district later on because more people know you and know you better.

Good luck!  I absolutely loved subbing and wish I could still do it!

Post # 12
Member
2496 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: January 1991

oh another tip — take a notebook with you in your bag and write down ideas from the teachers and classrooms that you like.  I got a whole bunch of classroom management ideas, activity ideas, and teaching methods that I now have in my teaching notebook.  It really helped when I started teaching in a learning center!

and write SUPER detailed notes to the teachers you sub for.  I wrote down evvverything… what I did for each part of their plan and how the kids responded.  I also made sure to be detailed about their behavior and anything else that was relevant.  It helped the teachers to see that I was serious about my job, and I often got called again to those same teachers, which was nice because then I knew the kids!

Post # 13
Member
853 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

I’m a regular teacher, but I know the best way to guarantee jobs is to be a regular at ONE particular school (there are 8 high schools in my district). The subs who get called back are the ones who are in the building networking, even when they don’t have a job that day. The more you are there, the more the teachers see that you are eager. As long as you follow the teacher’s plan and have excellent classroom management skills, you can become the “go-to” teacher that everyone seeks out when they are planning on being out. I know one of our subs is booked like every day, as much as a month out – EVERYONE competes for her. EVERYONE. She has an excellent reputation with the teachers, as well as the students, which is rare. Get friendly with the office staff (if they need anyone at the last minute, sometimes they just bypass the call system and start calling subs directly), and eat lunch in the lounge with the teachers. The more you are seen, the more relieved they feel about calling you as opposed to some random stranger in the system. 

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