Any Veterinarian bees that can help?

posted 3 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
4797 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

I’m no vet but I have 4 dogs. :o) If that fatty tissue is anything like a dog gets, it IS nothing to worry about. Usually the older dogs get them. Is your cat older? Sorry I know nothing about FIV.

Post # 5
Member
4797 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

If you trust your vet I’d try to relax about it. I know there is a thing called a fatty lipoma and it kind of moves around under the skin. its kinda grody, but not harmful. IF that’s what it is. I’m a super paranoid dog mama. I once took my dog to the ER for a tick! Lol! Easiest 85 bucks they made that night. Years later another dog got one and i took it out myself. Woot.

Post # 6
Member
1399 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

I once went to a cat sanctuary that had like, 800 cats.  The ones with FIV were separated just by a wire fence.  I think cats need to be in direct contact with saliva/bodily fluids to get FIV.  Your cat is safe!

Post # 7
Member
213 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

Vet here; I would follow your vet’s advice on the lump; if it grows in size (measure it with a ruler today!) or changes in character, have it rechecked. FIV is usually transmitted via bite wounds, so I wouldn’t worry about sharing a carrier. To be extra safe, you can wash it well with soap and water/laundry – it’s an enveloped virus that survives very poorly in the environment, but I wouldn’t be overly concerned.

Post # 10
Member
213 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

@MrsLPC2014:  

I wouldn’t necessarily repeat FNA unless it starts growing (if your vet thinks they can get a better sample) or changes in character (ulceration, hair loss, change in firmness/texture).

FNA allows us to get a sample of cells to look at – some cells don’t “peel off” well, and others do. Certain types of tumors have cells that “peel off” better than others. So in the case of an FNA with a few fat cells, we can say that 1) it’s fat or 2) it’s some other type of growth surrounded by fat but the other cells didn’t get adequately sampled (either due to the overall small size of the growth or if they aren’t the type of cells that “peel off”. The good news is that on FNA there weren’t tons of obviously abnormal looking cells!

In order to fully determine what it is, you need a chunk of tissue. If you want to be on the safe side, since it’s on the smaller side (although you haven’t defined how small is small – 1cm? 5mm?), your vet might be able to remove it under heavy sedation and send it in for full pathology — which might be worth it for your peace of mind. Otherwise, watch it; if it changes, have it re-evaluated.

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