Any wedding floral designers on here? How do they do so much in so little time?

posted 3 years ago in Flowers
Post # 3
Member
59 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: March 2008

@Burtongirl:  I can tell you how I do it, as an independent designer with no shop and no employees. For a typical Saturday wedding, I usually buy the flowers on Thursday very early in the morning at the SF Flower Market (nearly all of my events are market buys), and I invite my clients to come with me to help pick them out. I get the flowers home, do all the flower prep (removing leaves/thorns, trimming stems, putting flowers that need warm water to open in warm water, etc), and change the water in the buckets. Friday afternoon after the flowers have had a chance to rest and condition I usually start on centerpieces, reserving the special things I will be using for personal flowers. I make bridal and bridesmaid bouquets on Friday evening/night, wrapping them with floral tape but not finishing with ribbon or fabric until Saturday morning. Bouts and corsages I make Friday night as well. Everything’s finished early on Saturday morning so I can take photos, pack up my car, and deliver – sometimes everything to the venue, sometimes personals to where wedding party is getting ready if they’re doing photos before the ceremony. Any on-site designing I need to do (larger ceremony pieces, set up/decorate archway, etc) I do when I arrive at the venue. I make greenery garland pieces ahead of time as well.

How a traditional florist/shop does it: They order flowers in advance from a wholesale supplier that probably arrive on a Monday for a Saturday wedding. Flowers are prepped/conditioned with chemicals to stay looking fresh, arranged on Wednesday/Thursday, and sit in a floral cooler (usually having been sprayed with another chemical solution to keep the flowers looking pretty) until time to deliver on Saturday.

Post # 4
Member
51 posts
Worker bee

@Burtongirl:  I have a flower shop and can tell you the typical schedule. We get most of the flowers for the wedding on the Wednesday prior to a Saturday wedding. That day we do the processing (removing foliage, removing thorns, etc.) which includes getting the flowers hydrated, particularly if they’ve traveled from holland or California, etc. They either go into the cooler or they will be allowed to stay out and develop and open, such as roses or peonies or freesia, for instance. We design centerpieces on thursday and Friday, and those flowers go into the cooler when done. That keeps them staying beautifully fresh. Friday is the day for designing personals: bouquets, boutonnieres, and corsages. On Saturdays there is usually little design left to do, and instead we are focused on delivery and installation. And, when we have multiple weddings on a weekend, we coordinate it all with very similar timing! 🙂  (And, how great that your flowers looked beautifully fresh, lasting, etc. That’s how it should be…with you, the bride, loving her flowers!) 

 

Post # 7
Member
59 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: March 2008

@Burtongirl:  I think what you’re seeing are scabiosa pods and lisianthus buds. There are also scabiosa buds. Hope that helps!

Post # 10
Member
772 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

@greensnapdragon:  I think your description of how traditional flower shops do it is a little overgeneralized. I’ve worked at a few flower shops before and they simply wouldn’t have the space to store wedding flowers for almost a while week. 

Post # 11
Member
51 posts
Worker bee

@likewoah:  I agree With you about greensnapdragon’s description of a flower shop Schedule, which is why I provided mine. Its very similar whether it’s a shop or event florist or home based florist. 

Post # 12
Member
772 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

@FlowersFlowers:  Yeah, the schedule you posted is more in line with what I’ve seen. Either way, it’s a lot of work!

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