Anyone has a MA in Healthcare Administration?

posted 3 years ago in College
Post # 3
Member
1287 posts
Bumble bee

I’m starting back soon for my Bachelors, for Technical Management in Sales and Marketing. There are ton of jobs out there for that. 

Post # 5
Member
2675 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2014 - Madison, WI

We have an intern at work here with a BA in healthcare administration, she graduated in May and has yet to find a job in her field. Her work with us is part time hourly and not related to what she went to school for…she’s still looking. Not sure if prospects would be better with a MA.

I also know a few people who are local TV/news producers, some work third shift for $10/hour. Most are trying to or have gotten out of the field. Or they have second jobs. One works part time as a waiter and makes more doing that than producing so I can kind of understand the predicament you’re in at the moment. 

Many have gotten good jobs writting, doing copyright work, editing, working for papers etc…but even those jobs seem hard to come by at times.

As for going back to school if you want to find something marketable I would ask around in your area and see what there is a need for and if you think you can make any of the options work for you.

Post # 6
Member
513 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

@katherin788:  I have a Masters in Health Administration and an undergraduate in Psychology, both from a Canadian University.
There were a wide variety of backgrounds in my program (doctors, nurses, business, sociology etc.).
Just out of curiousity, what is drawing you to this field?
You could always work in a comms/PR role within healthcare too, getting an MHA.

The program that I took was a bit of a combo of MBA/MPA all with a health focus. So management, leadership, legal, accounting, strategic planning courses- and some policy courses and courses on the health system in general, or more specific aspects of it. So there were some really operational courses, and some really theoretical courses as well. Feel free to PM me if you have any specific questions.

Post # 7
Member
103 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@katherin788:  I completed an MHA and have found the job prospects to be great! It’s also a very broad field with tons of areas to specialize…so really depends on what you want to do. Those who were in my program are in a variety of different areas — finance, operations, consulting, sales, strategic planning, marketing, program management, informatics, etc. I’m in quality & process improvement. I completed my BS in Biology and worked for a couple years before figuring out what I wanted to do with my life and going back to school. I think depending on the area you live in, a communications degree is very valuable or at least gives you a foundation to work off of when pursuing an advanced degree.

@Ms_Purple:  Agree with the advice to find out what is in demands in your area.

Post # 9
Member
513 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

@katherin788:  I’d be happy to address your questions. Are you in the US or Canada? Aside from the systems being vastly different, job requirements and prospects also seem to vary (e.g. there are no undergrad HA programs in Canada, and many of the positions require you to have a masters- or be some sort of clinicians with a boat load of experience depending on the position).

Job opportunities & stability: This is usually a very regional thing- the majority of my graduating class got jobs pretty quickly, but there were a couple who struggled. I’ve found that depending on the job, having a clinical background is a huge asset, again this may be a regional difference. That said, with baby boomers retiring, there will need to be trained people to fill their roles over the next decade or so. Like many other fields, I think the key is getting into the field, and then having room to move up. The thing about health care is that it is a very human resource intensive field, which is good for job security. That said, it’s a field that is constantly looking at cut backs- and admin is usually where they like to start, not front line providers. A lot of health care environments in Canada are also heavily unionized, which can be a good thing for job security (but not a good thing for others- eg can be very difficult to get into a unionized job). There’s certainly a trickle down effect though- my job is not unionized, but I have an increasing pay scale that is based on years of service (yup! years of service… not even connected to performance- that’s a double edged sword).  I also typically get a 2-3% cost of living increase each year as well.

Pay: I’m 2.5 years in and make $60K. The median provincial family income is about the same where I live. So basically I, on my own, make about the same as a family. I live in a province with one of lowest  average incomes and wages, so if I was in a different province I could probably be making close to $80K. This is also a fairly entry level position , so I have lots of room to move up. The thing about healthcare, is that there is a lot of pay compression- so there’s not a huge difference between the bottom and the top of the organization (ie I make 60, my director makes ~100K and my CEO makes ~$170, which is a fairly large difference). Bonuses… pffffft.. I get a $25 gift card, but that’s what happens when you work in a non-profit. My FI works for a bank and gets $3000 in a bad year. This is likely different in the states where you can work for more for profit organizations.

Types of Jobs/Work: There are lots of clinical leader/ management positions which I do not qualify for, and based on your education you likely wouldn’t either. However there are many jobs that don’t require a clinical background – eg- working for the ministry of health/ government do policy analysis, program coordination/ management, do health services research, project management, quality/ process improvement, consulting work. You could also easily apply your communications background with an MHA and try to work in that targeted area. Most larger health organizations will have a director or VP of communications/ PR.

The other thing about healthcare is that it is pretty much a disaster and it’s going to take a long time to fix it, so there will always be admin/strategy/ policy/ research related jobs out there 😉

After talking to friends who work in other areas, private sector, legal etc., I’d say I’m pretty happy with working in the health sector. I may never make $500K in one year, but I feel prett stable in my job, started a decent salary that will continue to grow, regardless of actually being promoted. I also feel good knowing that in a few years when some dinosaurs decide to retire there will be more opportunities to grow… and last but not least, I genuinely find it interesting and feel like I’m helping people (in an indirect way).

Post # 10
Member
1287 posts
Bumble bee

@katherin788:  I don’t know what you mean? I have an Associates in Computer Science and Telecommunications.

Post # 13
Member
513 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

@katherin788:  The pre-req’s will vary depending on where you apply. I’d start by determining where you want to apply. My program required an undergrad (didn’t necessarily have to be related) with a certain GPA. If your GPA was above a certain level you didn’t have to submit scores from any standardized testing. That since has changed and I know my program now require the GMAT. Some places may require the GRE.

When looking into programs I would see what if any standardized testing you might need. I’d also look into whether or not the program is accredited. Mine was accredited by the Canadian Academy of Health Management Education- there is likely a US equivalent. Accreditation isn’t as big of deal here, but I’ve heard it’s more important in the US

Post # 14
Member
1779 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I’m just starting my Bachelor’s in this field and I think the job prospects are quite good in many areas. Of course, being in Rochester, we have 3 or 4 large hospitals, including URMC so I have many avenues for employment. For many of the more senior administration positions a masters is preferred. If you want to work in a nursing home environment I think separate programs/certification may be necessary. I currently work in a lower assistant-administration position without a healthcare administration degree but to advance it really is necessary. Healthcare administration is very math, finance, and managment related. As long as you have an interest in those areas and community health you should be set. If you want a position more community orient health and human services may be a better path.

@katherin788:  

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