(Closed) Anyone have an induction? I'm nervous!

posted 5 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 3
Member
818 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

I have never heard of the foley bulb, I was induced with cervadil and pitocin. Sorry I can’t be of help but wishing you good luck!

Post # 4
Member
7904 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: March 2012 - Pelican Grand Beach Resort

I was scheduled for induction with pitocin for my due date (Jan 9) but my water broke the day before. Induction is pretty darn safe and if you are being induced before 41 weeks, then there’s a reason and the risk of not having an induciton is greater than the risk of having one. You’ll be fine and that baby will be in your arms very soon.

Post # 5
Member
1041 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

@LuvMySailor:  You might want to change your title.  I was also induced, but with pitocin, and not with the foley bulb.  I don’t even know what the foley bulb is.

Post # 6
Member
575 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I was induced with cervadil and potocin, and it really wasn’t bad… the induction started on a Monday night, and my baby was born by 5pm  the next day. The thing that bothered me most was I was induced due to high blood pressure and couldn’t move due to the medicine I was on. Good Luck!!! Bring playing cards, it will be boring in the begining!

Post # 7
Member
1042 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2013

Why are you being induced? Has your doctor given you a medical reason? Inductions are generally safe, but do carry more complications than non-induction births, and increase the risk of c-section. that being said, if there is a true medical indication it is worth the slight risk!

Just to point out if you weren’t aware. The bulb helps to dialate an unripe cervix, but it is almost always followed by pitocin as the Foley bulb is not enough to start good labor.

 

Post # 9
Member
1042 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2013

@LuvMySailor:  I understand, and I don’t think you should go through with the induction if you are not comfortable with it! You have every right to say you would rather postpone it if that is you want to do.  Why put you and your baby through all of that if you don’t have, or want, to? 

Is there any way to work around the military exam? It stinks you have to plan around it.

Also, intercourse to the end… if you know what I mean, and nipple stimulation are great natural inducers as well!

ETA: And of course you aren’t progressing! You aren’t full term yet!

Post # 10
Member
404 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

@Bazingau:  same here… I was inducued with pitocin and it sucked. No clue what the bulb thing is.

Post # 11
Member
404 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

@LuvMySailor:  Dont do it then!

Post # 12
Member
663 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

I agree with @Stoppy321, if you aren’t being induced for medical reasons don’t do it if you’re not comfortable. I was induced with just pitocin with my second daughter (I was done being pregnant and my doctor told me to come in and tell the nurses that I was experiencing contractions since he was on call that day and it was my due date) and I totally regretted it. It was the worst of all of my deliveries (I had one before her and one after her) and the only one I needed pain meds for. 

Post # 13
Member
2263 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@mrsSonthebeach:  +1. No worries! I’ve had friends who had to have an induction. It was FAR better for them than if they had gone into labor naturally as the baby was overdue and at that time the size issue would have given them trouble if they waited. Chances are it’s a medical reason (I’m assuming) pretty much no doctor out there will induce for no reason, especially these days. (in my own experience anyway) 

Post # 14
Member
46 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: May 2012

Just to elaborate on the Foley bulb: it’s a mechanical method of cervical ripening that we use when other methods are not possible (too many contractions for a prostaglandin and not dilated enough for Pitocin). It’s a catheter that is placed inside the cervix and placed on tension. Not a comfortable procedure, but it does often work to produce some degree of cervical dilation.

I’m an OB/GYN and will tell you that it’s extremely rare for us to induce patients prior to 41 weeks unless there is a medical indication. Medical indications include hypertension/pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, intrauterine growth restriction (these babies need to be delivered sooner because the placenta is getting tired/old), and a very small handful of more rare indications. If I were you, I wouldn’t opt for an elective induction prior to 41 weeks. Inductions can fail and then you’re at the risk of having an unnecessary cesarean section (or just getting sent home to try again in a few days/a week). Feel free to ask me any other questions.

Post # 15
Member
7771 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

@LuvMySailor:  The standard deviation (range of normal healthy pregnancy) is 38 to 42 weeks, and not just 42- the END of 42.  Your dr. should not just induce you because “time is up!”  Unless there is some other medical reason…  I would get a second opinion.

Post # 16
Member
5655 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2011

Here is the recommendation of acog concerning elective induction (article):

Don’t schedule elective, non-medically indicated inductions of labor between 39 weeks 0 days and 41 weeks 0 days unless the cervix is deemed favorable.

I completely understand the conflict of scheduling, but inducing without medically needs comes with some seriously increased risks. Over 40% of elective inductions before 41 1/2 weeks ends in cesarean, and pitocin comes with an increased side effect of post partum hemorrhage.

Doctors are the medical professionals but all the evidence shows that inducing when you aren’t incredibly favorable sets you up for an increased likelihood of “needing” a cesarean which doesn’t just affect this pregnancy/delivery but EVERY subsequent pregnancy/delivery. Yea, your doctor can control most anything that happens but there is a cost & it’s you that pays, not them. If there were complications then it’s likely your husband would end up conflicted anyways b/c you would need care/help.

If you do go through with the induction just know all the risks & benefits that come with the choice. Do your research. I’ve known moms that have had easy inductions and others that were incredibly favorable (already 5 cm, thinned, and had bouts of preterm labor) that ended with a cesarean that had complications that lasted months to resolve and multiple surgeries. There is no way to tell how it may go so just be sure you are making a fully informed decision & that it’s not your doctors decision but yours.

GL

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