(Closed) Anyone here with a non education bachelor's go back for a M.Ed?

posted 5 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
12825 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

FMIL did this, and it was one of the best decisions of her life.  She loves her job now and always said it was a great decision on her part.

Post # 4
Member
2494 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

As a teacher, it will likely take years to get a job, no matter where you are. If you want to pursue it, I would talk to teachers in your area to see the average time it takes to get abfulltime contract. In ontario, it is usually 5 years from graduation— abyear to get on a supply list, several years of supplying and at least two years of long term supply work.

 

But if you love it, do it 🙂

Post # 5
Member
9917 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

Yes, I did this.  You’ll have to search around for master’s programs that allow you to apply without a teaching certificate already, but you’ll most likely find something.  

 

If you are interested in teaching early childhood education, though, keep in mind that you will most likely NOT be paid what you are worth.  Most of those jobs, from what I’ve seen, pay about $10 to $12/hour…  If you become a center director you might be paid more.

The program I followed for my master’s degree was a year and a half full-time.

Post # 6
Member
2335 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: November 2012

Yes, I got a MS in Education.  I’m glad I had a strong background in my subject area (bachelors) before getting my MS.  I chose to do a thesis track, rather than student teach and get my license, which I sort of regret now.

Post # 7
Member
9917 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

@BooRadley:  What do you do with your MS if you don’t teach?  AND how hard would it be to get your license?  I don’t know the rules in Virginia.

Post # 8
Member
2335 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: November 2012

@peachacid:  I work in public education, like museums and parks.  I’d have to go back and take a few more classes to actually get my license.

ETA: I went to grad school knowing I wanted to work in public education, but having a teaching license would be a good back-up option right now, since museum and parks are the first thing to get cut in budgets.

Post # 9
Member
1376 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2014

I’m thinking about going down this path too, but is pursuing a Master’s a good idea? I’ve read that schools are reluctant ro hire those with M.Eds because they have to pay them more. But are there ways to get your teaching certification pos-Bachelor’s without a going for a Master’s?

Post # 11
Member
1376 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2014

hebbywebby You hear lots about the horrible job market for teachers, but I think it’s area and subject specific. If I wanted to teach in my undergrad area, History, I’m sure it would be really tough to find a job, but I’m interested in teaching ESL, which is a growing field. Also, some states have better markets for teaching than others. What subject area do you want to teach?

Post # 12
Member
1460 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

Just a note:  some colleges offer a MAT or MST (masters of art or science in teaching), which focuses on your subject aread knowledge.  It’s built professionals who are going back to school and some schools offer the classes at night and/or on weekends.

I know a few people that chose this program at my university. 

Post # 13
Member
9917 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

@pokie45:  You could try applying to Teach for America, though I hate that program.  They would get you in the classroom immediately, though, which is good for someone like you.  And since you seem passionate about it, and have experience…well you probably wouldn’t get into TFA.  ….see below.

 

Why I Hate the Program, In Case you Care:  Most people I know who went through Teach for America left teaching after their required two years.  The people in TFA are inexperienced and are placed in the classroom WHILE they’re learning about educational theory.  So, they take inexperienced teachers and put them in the schools that need the MOST experienced teachers, and they give them NO incentive to stay more than two years.  So the schools have inexperienced teachers as well as a high turn-over rate for staff.  Since two of the problems in those are lack of experience and high teacher turn-over rates…I don’t see how TFA can be considered a successful program.

Post # 14
Member
332 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

I have a BA in Psychology and finished my M.Ed. in School Psychology last year.  I’m finishing my Ed.S. now.  A little different but still an M.Ed. 🙂

The topic ‘Anyone here with a non education bachelor's go back for a M.Ed?’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors