(Closed) Anyone know much about RH Incompatibility?

posted 7 years ago in Babies
Post # 3
Member
311 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2008

Since I am RH negative and my husband is RH positive, there is a chance of RH incompatibility for myself and my baby.  I will get a Rhogam shot at my next appt (29 weeks) and again after childbirth.  This should eliminate any problems.  It is possible that his wife did not get a Rhogam shot starting with the first pregnancy.

Post # 4
Member
3762 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

My SIL had to have the Rhogam shot during pregnancy.  She actually had a m/c before she knew. 

Post # 5
Member
720 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2009

I’m RH- and Hubby is RH+.  From what I understand, that’s the only instance that incompatibility can occur between mother and baby.  And the problem wouldn’t be with a first pregnancy but possibly with subsequent ones.  I got my shot during pregnancy and will get another after delivery.  Just seems weird that your boss’ wife would have issues because of this.  I thought blood testing and the Rhogam shots were pretty much standard practice and that that took care of any potential problems.  Maybe not.  Hope the baby’s ok!

Post # 6
Member
1645 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

from babycenter.com

Early in your pregnancy your blood will be tested to determine your blood type and your Rh status — that is, whether you have the Rh (Rhesus) factor, a protein that most people have on the surface of their red blood cells. If you do have the Rh factor, as most people do, your status is Rh-positive. (About 85 percent of Caucasians are Rh-positive, as are 90 to 95 percent of African Americans and 98 to 99 percent of Asian Americans.) If you don’t have it, you’re Rh-negative, and you’ll need to take certain precautions during your pregnancy.

If you’re Rh-negative, there’s a good chance that your blood is incompatible with your baby’s blood, which is likely to be Rh-positive. You probably won’t know this for sure until the baby is born, but in most cases you have to assume it, just to be safe.

Being “Rh-incompatible” isn’t likely to harm you or your baby during this pregnancy, if it’s your first. But if your baby’s blood leaks into yours (as it can at certain times during pregnancy and at birth), your immune system will start to produce antibodies against this Rh-positive blood. If that happens, you’ll become “Rh-sensitized” — and the next time you’re pregnant with an Rh-positive baby, those antibodies may attack your baby’s blood. Fortunately, you can avoid becoming Rh-sensitized by getting an injection of a drug called Rh immune globulin whenever there’s a chance that your blood has been exposed to your baby’s blood.

If you’re Rh-negative and you’ve been pregnant before but didn’t get this shot, another routine prenatal blood test will tell you whether you already have the antibodies that attack Rh-positive blood. (You could have them even if you miscarried the baby, had an abortion, or had an ectopic pregnancy.) If you do have the antibodies, it’s too late to get the shot, and if your baby is Rh-positive, he’s likely to have some problems. If you don’t have the antibodies, then the shot will protect you from developing them.

Post # 7
Member
3871 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

Wow, thanks for this thread. I was worried I was B negative but I just checked and I’m ‘B positive’.  Phew! Now I just need to figure out what the DH is.

Very interesting topic.  I wonder if there are any side effects to the Rhogam shot.  Maybe the mother in the OP’s post decided against it for one reason or another.  I don’t know why but there are people who decide not to get immuizations for their child.  Just like any shot, there are risks to almost every drug.

Post # 8
Member
1645 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

If you are +, it doesn’t matter what your husband is, at least not regarding rh issues or needing the rhogam shot. I don’t know what blood type DH is, but since i’m A+ I don’t have to worry about it.

Post # 9
Member
3871 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

I’ve taken a genetics class in school and I would think that if a dad is Rh- there is is a slight chance for the child to be Rh-. 

I found this answer from answers.com so it might not be accurate. If my DH is negative, then I would probably ask my doctor about it to make sure.

An Rh- dad and a Rh+ mom can have a normal baby, but the mom should be given a few injections during her pregnancy to prevent her from making antibodies against the baby’s blood. Normally the mom’s and baby’s blood doesn’t mix, but if it does it could cause some complications if the mom hasn’t had the shot.

Read more: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Can_RH_negative_husband_and_RH_positive_wife_have_a_normal_baby#ixzz1ArAvj3pd

 

ETA: Ok, from my brief research it does sound like this problem only occurs when the mom is negative.  Need to look into a little more as to why a Rh- dad doesn’t affect. (I need to pull out my genetics book from college…haha) I know the being Rh postive is the dominant gene/protein but there is a chance if one of my parents was negative… But I’m pretty sure they aren’t.  Good to know though.

Post # 10
Member
2562 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

@ttn133: The reason an Rh- dad doesn’t matter is that Rh – is an absence of a marker (therefore there is nothing for the mom to make antibodies against). 

There can be Rh issues now if an Rh- mom had a miscarriage of an Rh+ baby without seeking treatment, because than the mom can be sensitized to the Rh+ blood. Once someone becomes sensitized to Rh factor the Rhogam shot is no longer effective.

Post # 11
Member
1537 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

My mother is Rh- while my father is Rh+. They didn’t have the technology or education to treat this when my parents were trying to concieve. My fraternal twin miscarried mid way through my mother’s pregnancy and I carried to full term. My mother then had 5 more miscarriages before she and my father gave up trying. My mother was very sick during her last months of pregnancy and was in the hospital for 3 months after my birth.

 My doctor suspects that my low immune system may be because of our differing blood types. I didn’t have any serious health issues after I was born, but I do have a few quirks that can possibly be attributed to the Rh difference. My aunt and uncle are the same way. For my aunt is was much more dangerous because my uncle and her daughter are both AB+ which is very rare. My cousin and aunt were both in the hospital for a while after the birth. Both are fine and healthy now.

Post # 12
Member
258 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

It’s possible that the baby is hospitalized for reasons other than the condition of being Rh+.  It’s generally more a risk for the mother than it is for the baby after the birth (in utero for a 2nd Rh+ baby is another thing though…).  The jaundice and tranfusions indicate a liver problem, so he’s obviously got other major problems going on.  Though I suppose other system failures could be caused by Rh incompatibility…? 

Either way, don’t scare yourself too much.  I know this was just a thread for fun, but WebMD is….the bane of every medical practitioner and you should probably just talk to your OBGYN or PCP if you have concerns.  

Post # 13
Member
3871 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@Ms Mini: Thanks that makes sense!

Post # 14
Member
634 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I am +ive and my FI is -ive. Our son is -ive. He had bad jaundice which required treatment and a longer hospital stay as a result of him and I having different blood types.

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