Anyone on ADD medication?

posted 2 years ago in Emotional
Post # 2
Member
4218 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

I take concerta. I’m on a dose they rx for children. The thing about concerta is it is a controlled release, as opposed to ritalin which gives you highs and lows. It took time to get used to this medication but I am doing a lot better. I can focus and hold a conversation without interrupting someone every 3 seconds. The thing about this medication is it’s out of your system fast if it doesn’t agree with you. I was worried about addiction and stuff too, but honestly taking this medication is not giving me a woo hoo buzz. I’m just able to do what I need to do. Just work with your doc and psych together. 

Post # 4
Member
4218 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

Sporty-Bee:  For sure. I’ve been on several medications that have the” potential for abuse”. Xanex, percocet, etc. I also had very bad reactions to some anti depressants. A new medication is always scary. It’s playing with your brain function. I get it. But if your symptoms are so bad they’re runing your life, I mean, you have to deal with it. The thing with concerta was when I first took it, I developed anxiety and chest tension at the end of it’s 8-12 hour effectiveness at first. It goes away though. Now I have no side effects. 

Post # 6
Member
94 posts
Worker bee

I take 80 mg of vyvanse (I take 2-40mg tablets). It’s helped me clear my head so I can think things through before moving onto my next task. I’ve been on it for about 5 years now and it’s helped me in more ways then one. It’s actually level out my heart rate to the point I’m not having 3 or so seizures everyday. I don’t know where i would be without it. I’m not addicted to it but it has dramatically changed my life for the better. The only negative for me was the huge weight loss. I lost almost 50lbs in 3-4 months. I’m 22 now and weigh about 110lbs (5’5) which isn’t bad but there was a point where I got down to under 90lbs and had to be put on those nasty meal shakes to increase my calories. Besides the curb in my appetite I haven’t had any serious problems 

Post # 7
Member
1491 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

I’ve been on Dexadrine for the past 20+ish years.  I take a 15mg spansule (controlled release) that lasts about 8 hours and I take it every day.  I also am prescribed a 5mg tablet….which I can take if I need extra help over the course of a long day or if I need about 3-4 hours of concentration time.  I have had periods where I was off of the medication for a signicant period of time (like 3-6 months), and I really hated it. I hated the fog that I felt I was living in and how I was unable to concentrate to get anything done or even start a task.  The meds help me focus, and stay on track.  The difference is like night and day. I get things done when I’m on my meds, and I can get a lot done and completed.  Its like my brain is clear of any fog, and can handle multiple tasks and things thrown at it, no problem.   And my focus and attention to detail is so strong.  I feel almost like a completely different and competent person when I’m on the meds.  Like I’m a better, quicker, smarter version of myself.  The person I was meant to be, if I hadn’t been born with this disorder.  

 

My meds do curb the appetite, but I’ve found methods to deal with it after all this time.  I’m about 5-10lbs lighter on the meds, then if I weren’t on the meds, so for me its not like they radically affect my weight.  I have found no indication of addiction tendencies to the meds…The days I need it, I take a pill.   If I don’t have a heavy work load one day, I don’t take them or I take the lesser dosage.  

 

Post # 8
Member
35 posts
Newbee

I take Adderall for cognitive symptoms of a chronic illness. I am 25 and began at age 20. I tried Concerta and Ritalin first but this is the best fit for me. If you figure out equivalents doses, I’ve remained at the same amount of stimulant medication for the past 5 years. I easily can skip a day and all I notice is less help with my symptoms (poor focus, memory issues, fatigue). The half life of these meds is so short that there aren’t physical withdrawal symptoms. Kids who take ADD meds often skip weekends, days of schools, and off them for the Summer. 

I never “crave” Adderall in an addictive type way. I simply like being able to think clearly and be organized. It also helps with my blood pressure issues and fatigue. It is sort of like someone with a headache wanting ibuprofen. They aren’t craving it in an addictive sense; they want symptom relief. 

Post # 9
Member
9 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: September 2015

Agree with everything above.  I started taking ADD meds at 25 (now 28) and I realized I’d spent my life struggling with things that didn’t need to be a problem!  It was a total gamechanger and absolutely improved my life.  There is a huge stigma, though, since everyone thinks you’re abusing it (especially if you work a lot etc.).  Eventually I stopped caring.  Good luck!

Post # 10
Member
325 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2015

Sporty-Bee:  I have recently started taking medication. I understand where you are coming from. I am on Straterra, it is a non-stimulant medication with little to no risk of potential addiction. I am also seeing a therapist for Cognative Behavioral Therapy and Mindfulness Training. It has been so helpful, even though I do have periods of concentration difficulties due to anxiety. Learning to recognize triggers and signs of distractedness is essential. I journal, which helps as well. Be compassionate with yourself when you have moments of distraction and anxiety. <br /><br />Best of luck.

  • This reply was modified 2 years, 5 months ago by  .
Post # 11
Member
1201 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: A very pretty church.

Diagnosed as an adult. I don’t crave it, and it’s not ‘fun’. Please know that where it is correcting an issue you are unlikely to have ‘enjoyment’.

Post # 12
Member
1110 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2014

I was diagnosed as a late teen and spent a few years taking Adderall and going through behavioral therapy. I lost my insurance, though, and had to stop taking the meds and now I just plain can’t afford it. But because of the behavioral modifications I made I can function at about 80% most days. Sometimes it’s really terrible but on those days I just try my hardest and try again tomorrow.

Post # 14
Member
1466 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

Sporty-Bee:  I don’t have ADD, but I would recommend working with a counselor as you transition to medication. They are really smart and will pick up on it if there are any problems you are not noticing. They will be another voice helping you figure out medication with your doctor or psychiatrist. I also highly recommend seeing a psychiatrist. Primary care doctors are great, but this is the specialty of psychiatrists and they have much more experience with treating ADD. 

Also, I am pretty sure that if you have ADD you don’t respond to medication like a person who doesn’t have ADD, it’s not like you get high on it or something like people who don’t have it do. I think you’ll be able to tell right away if it’s not for you!

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