Are there any Social Worker bees out there willing to answer some questions?

posted 3 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
42 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: October 2014

Where in Canada are you? I’m near Guelph, Ontario 🙂

 

1. What is your educational background?

I have completed a diploma in Social Services as well as a certificate in Community Advocacy. I am working on my Bachelor of Arts in Social Development Studies on a part-time/online basis expected to be completed in 2017.

I have experience working for Social Assistance in both a clerical support (current) and case management role, on a crisis line, for the local AIDS committee in their youth program/needle exchange, for the United Way, as well as for a supervised access program.

2. Do you find your job emotionally draining? 

I currently work 2 jobs; one at the Social Assistance office and as a worker on a crisis phone line.  Because of the fast pace of the SA office, you don’t even realize what you’e doing or how hard you’re working until the end of the day. On the crisis line; it can be very draining (especially with repeat callers) and very frustrating (especially with callers who use the lines for sexual gratification).

3. Do you find your job rewarding? 

In a nutshell: absolutely . There’s definitely situations that are frustrating where A) my hands are tied – especially at SA office where it’s legislated by the gov’t, and B) on the crisis line where we can only offer so much support over the phone.

4. What does your average work day look like? (Basically, what is your schedule on a day to day basis?) 

Right now at the SA office, I’m the “go-to” person – switchboard and information giving. So there’s no “typical” or “average” day – you never know what calls you’re going to get, or who’s going to walk through the door that needs help.

Feel free to PM me if you have any more questions or anything like that – 🙂
 

Post # 4
Member
2665 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

I am a Residential Program Worker at the Children’s Service Center in PA.

I have also put in to be a Mobile crisis therapist but I havent gotten a call back yet.

1. What is your educational background? 

I have a BA in English with a minor in Psychology and I am going fot my Master’s in Mental Health counseiling.

 

2. Do you find your job emotionally draining? 

The good days are Freaking Awsome. The Bad Days are so bad they make you want to drink two bottles of wine and then sleep for a month and never come back to work ever ever again.

  The stories you will hear will break your heart, infuriate you, make you sick and jade your preception of human beings.

The parents will anger you beyond any rage you have ever encountered before and the kids will break your heart and frustrate you all at the same time.

 You need to be careful of vicarious trauma, takeing your kids trauma and feelings and makeing them your own, and being realisitc that you are never going to ” save ” anyone. 

You will have kids that have been Tortured, forced to have sex with their mothers by the age of 8, have been locked in closets and never met another person except their ” care givers”, children that set things on fire and kill animals because they can’t cope with their lives, and children who are so broken at such a young age that they are/have/ will again actively attemped suicide, and ALL of them BLAME THEMSELVES for the abuse that has been done to them.

3. Do you find your job rewarding? 

Oh yes. The good days are the BEST DAYS. When a kid looks at you and you can see it on their face that they want to trust you and tell you things, but they are afraid because they have been so hurt and so abused by everyone in their lives that were supposed to love and protect them , AND THEN THEY  decide to TRUST YOU and TALK TO YOU ANYWAY…. that is the best feeling.  When they look up and go ” I got handed a shitty hand at life, and it’s not my fault and I will be ok”.   Those are the best times.

4. What does your average work day look like? (Basically, what is your  schedule on a day to day basis?

) Because I am an RPW we have a 24 hr group home. I get the kids that CY drop off to us to take care of,  and kids that their parents dont know what to do with so they give them to us.  I have 8-16 hr shifts, and sometimes I get called in if there are especailly Bad Things happening.  I take care of them, talk with them, make sure they don’t hurt themselves or anyone elce. I have scars from having to put kids in a theraputic hold so they didn’t hurt themselves or me with the peice of glass they found outside.  We give them a strutrued day and do theraputic groups with them as part of “treatment”. We take them to the movies, to go carting, to rollerskating and next week were going to Six Flags.

 

The pay sucks. I get 11 bucks an hour BECAUSE I have a degree.  Don’t go in to this feild for the moeny because it isn’t there.  You will go home somedays ” I don’t get paid enough to deal with this shit”, and other days The GOOD days, you will say ” I am getting paid to do this? Awesome!”

 

 

 

Post # 6
Member
42 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: October 2014

@allinoelle:  I’m only 22 🙂 I started with the United Way as a summer student 3 years in a row when I was only in Grade 10 – and I got my first “real job” with the AIDS committee in Grade 12.

Post # 7
Member
226 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 2014

1. What is your educational background? 

I have a BSW and am currently attending graduate school part time for my MSW with an emphasis on mental health and psychotherapy

2. Do you find your job emotionally draining? 

I find my job to be a little emotionally draining but I think that is more so because I am trying to do too much ie work full time/ go to grad school/ and raise a child.

3. Do you find your job rewarding? 

I do find my job rewarding . I found my internship position to be super rewarding as I was getting elderly and mental health persons assistance to stay in their homes (least restrictive environments) to lead a fulfulling life.

4. What does your average work day look like? (Basically, what is your schedule on a day to day basis?) 

I am in at 8 with staff meetings and bill the state by the half hour. I spend twoish hours counseling mental health and the rest of my day doing paperwork. I also fit in some group work each week. I am done at 4 (sometimes stay late or leave early) as I am a salary employee. I am on call one night every other week and a few weekends a year.

Post # 8
Member
1840 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2015

I’m a mental health therapist, serving the aging population (55+). A therapist typically has a caseload of 18-20 clients.

1. What is your educational background? I have a BA in Psych, but my internships in undergrad really were social work based. I interned with a child advocate non-profit, as well as a university-sponsored geriatric program linking students with the aging population. My track was Developmental Psych.

2. Do you find your job emotionally draining? Yes. I think it’s foolish to believe you won’t get burned out in this field. I’m 3 years in and I feel it. Sometimes, it’s not even the (ever-piling) paperwork or the red tape. It’s sometimes not being given enough time for self care or even catching up on paperwork. Yes, we get vacation time but can you imagine “leaving” 18-20 aging clients you see everyday who may or may not be in crisis? I went on vacation last year…the FIRST DAY one of my clients is admitted to the CRC and never returned to program. I haven’t been on vacation since.

3. Do you find your job rewarding? Oh, yes. My clients and I share an amazing bond. I pride myself on being very good at establishing rapport with my clients. One of my clients actually just said that I was “her heart” the other day. I have been given hugs and shared so many laughs with these wonderful people. It’s not the people I serve that burn me out…it’s time constraints. Constantly hamster on a wheel feeling.

4. What does your average work day look like? (Basically, what is your schedule on a day to day basis?) Enter 8:30, start paperwork. 9:00 is always the staff meeting, which can run anywhere from 9:05 to 10:15, depending on how many issues there are. After that, we head back to our office to either see clients, meet with clients in the day room (we’re a day program), or catch up on paperwork. If it’s not a “half-day” where we’re required to let them go at 12:15 but we stay for a long, boring meeting until 4, we either engage in 30 minute groups on our days, or go on trips out in to the community, or catch up on paperwork/make phone calls to those in the hospital/to providers with issues/to clients with issues.

After lunch, we wrap up by seeing as many people as possible.

It really is an awesome job in which EVERYBODY is underpaid and it is almost guaranteed you will burn out. We go to trainings that “teach” us not get burned out or vicariously traumatized.

Post # 9
Member
42 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: October 2014

To the bees commenting about being underpaid; I think that might depend on where you are/who you work for. Both of my positions are very well paid (one is government one is not) for the line of work, and are what I would seek from a “non SS” job as well.

To the OP bee: Don’t let the $ discourage you; whether it’s what you’re reading here or what you’re seeing. Everything you do even if it’s for less $ than desired will surely help you out – I started out at $10.50 an hour at the UW and am making just under $30/hr now. I don’t consider that “underpaid” considering my education (and therefore lack of as I don’t have a BSW or MSW).

Leave a comment


Sent weekly. You may unsubscribe at any time.

Find Amazing Vendors