(Closed) are YOU a photographer? whats your equipment?!

posted 5 years ago in Photos/Videos
Post # 3
Member
98 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

I just started photography as a more serious hobby 6 months ago.  After much research, I went with the Nikon D5100.  Anyone will tell you that between Canon and Nikon is more a comfort and personal preference decision.  The Nikon was comfier in my hands, so that’s what I went with.  I went with the 5100 over the 3100 because I liked its features and specs a bit more, but now there’s the 5200 in the mix, so I don’t know much about that one.

A lot of people will tell you not to get the “kit” lens which is usually a 18-55mm so-so quality lens.  I kept flipflopping between wanting to start with the kit lens or wanting to start with a 50mm prime lens.  I went with the kit lens.  Scandalous.  I felt like there is so much learning to do with a new camera that I would just get the cheap kit lens, and can always get a 50mm prime later (it’s only like $100) when I want to further improve my photography.  Also, I wasn’t really sure what I’d want to shoot, so I liked the flexibility of zooming that you get with the kit lens, which you don’t with a prime lens.  Since you’re likely to use your camera mostly for close-up baby cuteness, you might want to go with a prime lens.  Prime lenses don’t let you zoom, so if you want your subject to take up more of the frame, you actually need to move your feet and get closer to the subject.  Primes force you to be more consious of what you’re doing, so from what I’ve read, they’ll teach you a lot.  

I also bought a bigger zoom lens when I bought my camera to do more nature/long-distance type stuff.  

You an PM me if you want some links to different sites I read when researching.  I’m happy with what I got; it’s a nice starter DSLR.

Post # 4
Member
484 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

@wifegoodman:  If you are looking to pick up an entry level DSLR I was very pleased with Nikon’s entry levels… both the D3000 and D5000 series have nice cameras, and they are a great step up from a point-and-shoot.  You have the option to use it easily on automatic, or to learn some of the basics of photography and start taking more creative control over your images.  I recommend starting with one of these guys and a kit lens.  That will be sufficient for your vacation and family photo needs!  If you find that you are getting more into photography and want to pick up extra lenses, you can always do that at a later time.  Nikon makes several decent and affordable DX lenses.

 

My parents have a Canon entry level DSLR… I think Rebel TI3 or something like that?  I don’t know my Canon gear very well, but when I’ve used it I think does pretty well too.  I just prefer Nikon.

 

ETA:  I forgot my typical disclaimer that goes along with my camera advice!  These are great cameras for the amateur, but they are by no means professional gear.  Pro gear costs about 10 times what these cameras cost.  So whatever you do, don’t buy one of these and then think it’s cool to set up shop charging money for photos!  You cannot do a pro job with an entry level body. 

Post # 5
Member
96 posts
Worker bee

Pentax has great entry level cameras that are easy to use too. I love them! i currently shoot with a K-r but am hoping to upgrade to the K5II soon. 

The cool thing about Pentax is that they have in body stabalization so any lens, even old film lenses will have that stabilation. They also have a ton of features and are easy to use. The KX and K-r’s are both good entry level cameras.

Good luck!

Post # 7
Member
484 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

@wifegoodman:  I’m glad!  I didn’t figure you were planning on going pro or anything, but I’ve seen far too many “aspiring photographers” that bring the entry level camera and kit lens out to a wedding or portrait shoot and set it on automatic!  That is so horrifying it’s beyond description… lol (but not really.  I don’t really laugh about that).

Anyway, definitely get the kit lens!  The 50mm is great, but its range is very limited.  When I was using it on my first Nikon, I often had difficulty getting far enough away from my subject in close quarters.  It can be difficult to take photos inside, at a restaurant, etc because of that, so I wouldn’t recommend it.  Honestly, there’s no reason to get it at all to start with.  I can’t imagine what you’d be doing where it would really help you at first.  If you want to pick up a second lens after the kit lens, I highly recommend either the 55-200mm or 55-300mm.  I believe they are both very cheap now, and they give you so much more range than the kit lens (which is an 18-55).  You will be able to get nature shots…. or take telephoto pictures of your kids at a soccer game, etc.  I used the 55-300 a lot and thought it did a great job, all things considered (again, though, not as pro gear).

Post # 8
Member
1314 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2006

Ask yourself if you’re going to learn about aperture, shutter speed, iso, and the other fundamentals of lighting that you can control with a manual camera like an SLR.  If your aim is to just use the SLR on an auto mode you’re not going to gain much benefit from it than you would over a point and shoot.  The second element in the equation is post processing software. Digital photos need development in order to make them exceptional, and if you’re planning on downloading things straight out of the camera you may find the results disappointing. To be honest most of the entry level cameras are pretty similar in terms of features – I’d base the decision more on ergonomics and lenses choices than I would anything.  The used market is also a pretty great thing these days.

Post # 10
Member
436 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

@wifegoodman:  Photography is a big part of my business. When I first became interested in photography, my husband bought me a Canon Rebel T1i. Even five years later, it is STILL an awesome camera–it’s a perfect beginner DSLR. I’d say if you’re not familiar with photography, start with an entry-level DSLR. I would have no problem recommending any of the Canon Rebel cameras (They have T1i, T2i, T3, T4, etc…). They’re great! They’re also built well–I use mine out in the farmyard and it gets a little more wear and tear than most cameras, and it still works like a dream. 
Another benefit to the Rebel cameras is the price. You get more than what you pay for, and it leaves you with some money left over to buy a lens. If you’re wanting to take great, professional-looking pictures, the first and BEST lens you can buy to go with a Canon camera is a 50mm f/1.4 lens. The 50mm is my favorite–and it produces lovely bokeh (that blurred-out background effect that makes things look SO dreamy!) for not a lot of money! It’s one of my favorites! 

If you have any questions, PLEASE feel free to PM me! I love to share my knowledge with people! 

Post # 12
Member
121 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I’m a part time photographer and started 4 years ago when my fiance (bf then) bought me a Nikon D60. I slowly upgraded over the years as I was still learning about photography and now I shoot with the Canon Mark II and the Canon 7D. Lenses wise I shoot with the 50mm f1.2, 85 f1.8, 24-70, 70-200 f2.8, 16-35 along with 580 EX flashes. 

Post # 13
Member
20 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: September 2014

I have both the Canon 40D as well as the Canon EOS M.  The EOS M is essentially a DSLR but without the mirrors.  I have the M to carry around with me in my purse or on vacation.  It is light and the camera preforms great (it is a little slow on the focus but not as bad as some point and shoot cameras). It also has a manual mode so you can play with shutter and f-stop as well as ISO. It is the size of apoint and shoot but it has changeable lenses and you can also get an adapter to beable to use the ef sieres of lenses. I love my 40D for artistically put together shots when I am doing wildlife photog and landscapes. I have 3 lenses. The 17-85mm with Image stabilising(IS), the 75-300 with IS and the 50mm 1.4f.  The all serve their purpose and I love all three of them.  I have the adapter for the M and I am able to use all of my lenses like normal. 

Also I reccommend getting a second battery to have for back up no matter which camera you end up getting.   There is nothing more frustrating than running out of battery and not having your back up battery with you.  Always have it with you and your camera!

I hope this helps.  If you have more questions let me know! 🙂 

Post # 14
Member
121 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

A lot of people have the misconception that if you have a DSLR your photos will be great! In most cases that’s true if you know how to use your camera. But to be honest if you just want a great quality camera for travel and family I would recommend getting a mirrorless camera.

 

As a photographer, as much as I love shooting with my Mark II, sometimes I just want a smaller compact camera that I can quickly pull out and travel with (where I don’t need to carry so many different lenses on top of an already heavy bulky camera body).

 

One camera I’ve been eyeing is the Nikon V1 which is amazing in low light, and produces great quality photos. My bestfriend and her sister and her sister’s bestfriend recently bought it and wow it’s pretty impressive and easy to use. One of the better mirrorless cameras. Still has interchangeable lenses if you want different ranges but i find the lens it comes with is pretty good for standard. Go to your local camera shop and test it out, I think its on sale now but Nikon may be making a newer model soon.

 

Post # 15
Member
323 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

I am a pro and I would say that if you’re just wanting happy snaps, I would not be bothered with a DSLR unless you plan to learn to use it properly. A DSLR does not mean you automatically get great shots. Buy the gear you can afford, while being strategic, then learn to use it properly. 

If you do get a DSLR skip the kit lens. They are absolute junk. Get a Tamron fast glass standard zoom such as the 28-75mm 2.8. $500 and craps all over the kit lenses. 

Personally, I currently shoot with a 5DII and a variety of fast lenses. I love shooting with it but it is really heavy so so I am looking at a quality compact with interchangeable lenses for travel etc. I’d love the Sony full frame baby camera but it’s $3k and I can’t justify that when I have thousands of dollars worth of equipment myself. 

 

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