Article about K-Cups damaging reproductive health, and more….

posted 2 years ago in TTC
Post # 2
Member
6273 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2013

i don’t drink coffee but my huband uses our kurig everyday, luckily he uses the reusable filter.

i was worried about plastic containers in the microwave because that’s how i heat up my food that bring for lunch.  my friend, a chemist at FDA, said the majority of plastics are microwave safe nowadays and i shouldn’t worry.

 

Post # 3
Member
8418 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: April 2013

PakiBee03:  It seems like the more convenient a food/beverage product is, the more likely it will kill/harm you.  I don’t drink coffee, but my husband does and we purchase our beans from sweet maria’s and roast them ourselves.

Post # 4
Member
2696 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

I’m not shocked. We also have a keurig and I always questioned the plastic filters. Eventually we’ll probably get a reusable metal one.

For now my DH uses coffee k-cups that are mesh, so there’s a lot less plastic to come in contact with the hot water.

Post # 5
Member
8592 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2013

I don’t own one.  But I did drink one a day during my pregnancy because my office had a big Keurig machine (and the free coffee to go with it).  Now they have some different machine that uses these little packet type things so I use those.  I use them because they’re there, and free.

I do think they’re wasteful though, so I won’t buy one, personally.  I can’t imagine using one a day or a few a week are going to do much to your body.  I usually think most things are fine in moderation.  I don’t think Kcups are much different than microwave popcorn or teflon pans when it comes to harming you.  So it all probably depends on your usage levels.

Post # 6
Member
6000 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2013

 

Eh, I agree that the more convenient it is, the more likely that’s it’s harmful. Just like processed foods. However, I only use the reusable filter mainly because k-cups are overpriced and a waste of money IMO. It’s not that hard to scoop some coffee into the filter.

Post # 7
Member
870 posts
Busy bee

I think there is a new article every day claiming everything from strawberries to oreos to even water has some propensity to be a health-related issue. As with anything else, everything in moderation. It shouldn’t be a  surprise that the less processing your food and beverages go under the healthier they are for you but that doesn’t necessarily mean you need to forgo modern conveniences for the sake of one article which notes NPR as it’s scientific source. If you’re worried get the metal filter.

Post # 8
Member
42460 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

I find that credible information is more likely to come from a source where the doctor is not flogging books and supplements.

Post # 9
Member
2179 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: March 2024

The source is an NPR article and a naturopathic doctor, no studies are linked at major universities or anything. I wouldn’t count this as a credible source of information. 

Post # 10
Member
2675 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2014 - Madison, WI

I love my Keurig still, for the most part I use these Organic 97% Biodegradable KCups anyway which do not have the plastic cup but instead their own little filter. My husband doesn’t drink coffee, just myself at home and this is much easier and usually less wasteful and messy overall. If I don’t use my Keurig then I tend to use a French press. 

Post # 11
Member
320 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: March 2015

I too would not consider this credible.  No evidence behind it and not an objective source. 

Post # 12
Member
2203 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2017

Oh, come on…  The NPR article states this.  It’s right there.

“But it’s still unclear whether people are being harmed by BPA or any other so-called estrogenic chemicals in plastics. Most studies of health effects have been done in mice and rats.”

And then further down:

“Some scientists wondered about the test’s reliability. Others noted that wine and many vegetables also can act like estrogen. And a few observed that Bittner has a financial interest in the testing lab and in a company involved in making plastic products that don’t release estrogenic chemicals.”

Let’s recap.  The study that allegedly supports this doctor’s claim 1) wasn’t testing health effects and 2) has had it’s reliability called into question.

Oh, and this is the real author of the paper: Dr. Rivard is a licensed naturopathic doctor (N.D.) and owner of Seasons Natural Healthcare, LLC in southern NH.  A naturopathic doctor.  I’ll let you all Google that if you don’t know, but the gist of it is that a naturopathic doctor generally prefers treatments that don’t line up with evidence-based medicine and may not be certified (especially since certification is only “required” in some areas, not all, and “certified” does not mean they had medical residency or went to medical school- heck, there are areas that prohobit certification).  They generally do not believe in surgery or any drugs.  And they’re anti-vaccines.  Take that for what you will, but I place my faith in evidence-based science.

Am I saying that there are no ill-health effects from K-cups?  No, but I am saying that the argument presented here doesn’t make a solid case, in my opinion.

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