(Closed) Article About Name Change Study

posted 8 years ago in Names
Post # 3
Hostess
18646 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

Hmm that’s interesting.  Sort of annoying that there is a negative thought of women either way.  I think people should just be allowed to make their own decision and not have people saying they are stupid and dependant or a ball busting feminist.

Post # 4
Member
14186 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

I don’t know if I buy it. Plus, the study was done by students, not employers.

Heck, I got a raise after I got married. But I highly doubt i’d have got offered less money because I took my husband’s name….

Post # 5
Hostess
18646 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

I think the reason a lot of women don’t make as much is because we don’t know how to negotiate salaries, not because we are married or unmarried.

Post # 6
Member
251 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

yeah, I don’t buy this either

Post # 7
Member
2289 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: November 2010

I’d have to agree….I think it’s a stretch.

Post # 8
Member
2004 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: November 2008

The wrong interpretation is clearly being made here! Clearly the finding is that when women are perceived as more feminine (demurring, accepting, caring, nurturing), they are offered lower salaries. Women who are perceived as more masculine (strong, take-charge, no-nonsense) are given higher salaries. And they have found that taking your husband’s name is perceived as a feminine thing to do.

Really there’s nothing in there that we didn’t know before.

Post # 10
Member
860 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

Hmmm, interesting. 

On a somewhat related note, I’ll be interviewing for a new job soon and have been debating whether to wear my engagement ring on interviews. 

In my profession, I think employers are very hesitant to hire married or soon-to-be married women b/c they expect they will have children, or otherwise won’t be able to work the long hours.  On the other hand, there are tons of married men around (even the younger ones).  I think they are viewed as being more “stable.” 

Post # 11
Hostess
18646 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

@Angela: I know what you mean.  In my recent interview, they asked if I had kids because it might be difficult to travel and work late if I had them.

Post # 12
Member
5263 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2012

Correlation does not equal causation! I agree with above posters. 

Post # 13
Member
166 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

@MissAsB, I don’t think interviewers are actually allowed to do that (ask whether you have kids or are married or any other personal questions of the kind). A bunch of my women colleagues and I were coached by some people in our university’s HR department about this exact issue a few weeks ago because many of us are starting to apply for jobs as researchers. I mean it’s a difficult question to deflect (and not exactly as though it’s a good idea to point out to an interviewer that they asked an illegal question…way to not get a callback, huh). But just so in the future you know that you don’t have to answer that question!

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