(Closed) Asked 3 times, didn’t get promotion and getting married…stay or quit?

posted 9 years ago in Emotional
  • poll: Asked 3 times, didn't get promotion and getting married...stay or quit?
    Start looking for a new job : (7 votes)
    30 %
    Hang in there for 7 months and keep trying your hardest : (7 votes)
    30 %
    Hang in there and do enough to just get by, quit after wedding : (1 votes)
    4 %
    Try hard for a 3 months and ask again : (3 votes)
    13 %
    I'd be so pissed, I'd quit right then and there : (0 votes)
    Other, please expain : (5 votes)
    22 %
  • Post # 3
    Member
    14186 posts
    Honey Beekeeper
    • Wedding: June 2009

    Well, you haven’t provdied a lot of information. Particularly with the economy being this bad, it’s hard to say whether or not promotions are being handed out very much.

    If your boss says you haven’t done above and beyond, she has a point. Have you done anything to prove that you are ready for what the next promo level is? Are you moving from employee to manager? Or by promotion are you just talking pay raise?

    Did you just get pissed, or did you ask your boss what you can do so that next year you’re in a better position to ask for a promotion?

    Don’t quit. Prove yourself!

    Edit: I work in an engineering office, and we are encouraged to work “beyond” our job descriptions. Those lead to promotions (level changes) and reclassifications (more money)….i guess the word promotion varies by office. For us, we don’t get promoted when we ask, we move up through engineering levels based on time periods because within certain years you are given specific responsibilities. Such is R&D. BUt i wanted to clarify since Mrs.Spring had some good points

    Post # 4
    Member
    6010 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: May 2009

    Wait, are you asking for a promotion or a job reclassification?  Because, technically, you should be doing things outside your job decription for only very limited periods of time (like 5% of your daily work load).  If she expects you to do a bunch of stuff outside your job description, that would be considered a reclassification of your position, which is a lot messier/takes a lot more time (i.e. she probably doesn’t want to get into that process).

    If you are asking for a promotion, I think it really depends on how you’re asking.  You should bring in a copy of the job description for the position you’re currently in and the position you want to be in.  Then show her how you qualify for the new position (i.e. I have these certifcations, I have these skills, etc… that are required for this new job).  Plus, I would let her know what you’re bringing to the table in regards to improving the company more from the new position than you can currently do from the old position.  I also think it’s helpful to bring in past evaluations, memos from co-workers commenting on your work, training/achievement certifications, etc… proving that you are ready to move on.

    Honestly, like ejs said, there might be a lot more reasons why your boss can’t promote you right now.  There might be limitations on how many people can be in that position, they might not be able to afford the pay raise, or maybe she just really doesn’t think you are ready yet. 

    If it were me, I wouldn’t give up.  I would go back into that office totally prepared with all of my research and materials.  If she still turns you down for the promotion, ask her for a detailed performance improvement plan.  You two should sit down together to create a plan that will allow you to move up in a year or so by making specific improvements in performance or skill.  If she still puts up a fuss, then I might reconsider going to HR to complain or quitting.  But it’s hard to get a job in this economy, so I think I would put in a lot of effort first before quitting.

    Post # 5
    Member
    6661 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: May 2010

    I understand your frustration. I wonder what kind of company you work for and how large/corporate it is. Most of the time, promotions are political and done out of necessity. Your particular department has to have the budget to promote someone in the first place. How can you tell if yours does? Look around you – anyone else getting promoted? I say they are political because in most cases it’s not just your boss who has to sign off on it, it’s also the other bosses around him/her who interact with you on a regular basis. It’s like getting voted to be mayor.

    Also, people don’t just get promoted because they’ve been asking for a while. Make sure you have concrete evidence of how you’ve gone above and beyond what’s written in your job description. If your boss keeps telling you you’re just performing average, then ask him/her how you can go above and beyond. Then spend the next 6 months – 1 year doing just that. And if that doesn’t work I would assume they don’t really value you as an employee and I’d start looking for a new job.

    Post # 7
    Member
    778 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: March 2009

    I would not quit a job in this market.  Wait it out, try again, but start looking for a new one in the meantime.

    Post # 8
    Member
    1019 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: January 2010

    If you feel you are being unfairly overlooked, I would keep doing what you are doing… and then when you go home at night start looking for another job. Don’t quit unless you have one lined up– this is NOT the economy for that! But there is no sense in staying in a dead-end job, either.

    Keep us up-to-date on the situation! Good luck!

    Post # 9
    Member
    6010 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: May 2009

    Huh, has she given you specific performance-based reasons on what you can do to improve/prepare for the higher position?  Like moderndaisy said, promotions are political.  If she isn’t willing to help you prepare to move up to the next level, it sounds like there is a problem with the company, not with you.  Sometimes companies promote an employee because of political reasons, but it becomes really messy unless they give everyone the same treatment.  On the other hand, “senior” typically denotes the leadership position in the department, so even if 3 other people have moved up that position lately they might not be able to move you up because of limitations on how many people can actually have as a “senior asscoiate” at one time.  I would ask her how many openings there are for “senior associate” in your department because she might be telling you the truth about why she can’t promote you.

    If your boss can’t or won’t help you create a plan on how to move up, I would consider talking to your HR department.  Depending on the size of your company, you might even have a compensation and classification analyst you can go talk to, maybe even an analyst specifically for your department.  HR would be able to give you concrete reasons on why you haven’t been moved up, or they’ll be able to do an investigation in order to determine whether you should move up or not.  Don’t give up yet, though! You still have a lot of options to try out before quitting!

    Oh, I should add that I use standard comp & class terms in my posts, but like ejs said, different companies word things differently.  So you might have a little variation in terms and ideas, but the general processes should be the same.

    ETA:  I changed my first part a little after reading your latest post.

    Post # 10
    Member
    14186 posts
    Honey Beekeeper
    • Wedding: June 2009

    I do think sitting down with her and asking for a performance review is good. Ask what you can do so that this time next year, you’re in a position to promote. Ask her what kind of tasks *outside* your job she is looking for. And jump on those projects.

    Post # 12
    Member
    14186 posts
    Honey Beekeeper
    • Wedding: June 2009

    Sounds lke your company needs to get with the times. What manager doesn’t give feedback? that’s mandatory for us every 6 months, plus whenever we need a chat basically. Hold her to that–make sures she gives you something this time around that you can work on. Hopefully she’ll take notice of your efforts now. Unfortunately, sometimes we get passed over for the “consultants” ugh, I know we have that issue here.

    If you’re unhappy in general with your job it doesn’t hurt to look around but this is a reltively common atmosphere I think. Definitely don’t jump ship until you got something! If your boss knows how you’re willing to work, that may really give you that boost to get noticed. Maybe they just noticed those other people at the right time.

    Post # 13
    Member
    2695 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: April 2010

    I agree with the others. Don’t quit your job unless you have another one lined up.  Also, you can’t compare your job title or pay to the others without knowing the background on them which you don’t.  They could have negotiated when they hired on that they become Senior within a specified time-frame.  I used to work in HR for an Engineering company and some people would negogiate all kinds of things into their hire.  Wish I’d known that when I hired on!   I would wait and see if she gives you a list of goals.  In the meantime start looking for other jobs.

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