Babysitting job?

posted 3 years ago in Career
Post # 2
Member
6034 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2014

Well if you’re not paying taxes on the money you make in cash, you can’t prove you ever made it when it comes to getting credit or loans. 

Post # 3
Member
98 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

How old are you? I only ask because while some of babysitting rates is definitely dependant on the area, around here it is also determined by experience, age, cpr and first aid certification, reliable transportation and clean driving record, college degree, etc.

I was getting $5/hour when I was 15 babysitinng/mother’s helper with almost no experience, no degree, no car (parents picked me up and dropped me off, etc.)

Now, I am 22, with a bachelor’s degree in child development, a current cpr and first aid certification through red cross, a car and a clean driving record and about 7 years of experience and I get $15-20/hour in the greater Boston area.

Maybe you should negotiate your rate!

Post # 4
Member
42546 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

FutureMrsB123:  What education level do you have? Do you have career goals? Which job would look better on a resume to help you with those career goals?

Post # 6
Member
6034 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2014

FutureMrsB123:  you can file it as earned income on your tax return, and pay the appropriate tax on it. Depending on how much you make, the person paying you might get into trouble for not filing the employer paperwork and paying the employer’s side of the taxes. If you put it on your tax form, the government is going to want to know where it came from. Otherwise we would all just write in that we earned $50,000 in cash last year, and get bigger bank loans!

Post # 8
Member
6034 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2014

Well to be honest, most people are not passionate about their jobs, most jobs are emotionally draining and most jobs are not fun. That’s why they have to pay you to do them. Most people learn over time how to see their job as the thing that gives them money to do the things that make them happy, but not the thing that makes them happy in and of itself. I like my job; I don’t love it, it doesn’t fill me with joy or passion, but it gives me the money I need to have the life I want.

Post # 9
Member
1802 posts
Buzzing bee

FutureMrsB123:  not paying taxes means you can’t prove your income for car loans, apartments, etc. As a nanny myself I would laugh at $5 an hour. You could always check out one of the many nanny websites for a better paying job if its something you want to pursue, but being a nanny is much more than arts and crafts and going swimming. Plus, did the parents even say its okay for you to meet up with your FI? I would never bring the kids I watch around my SO. Not because he’s a creep, but I doubt the parents would be too happy if they found out I was basically being paid to go on dates. 

Post # 10
Member
112 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

I am a nanny. After working an office job for years, I decided being a nanny was more up my alley and I love it so much. I live in the Bay Area where people pay a LOT for nannies. I make $30 dollars an hour cash and I work 40 hours a week. Plus all holidays paid, 2 weeks vacation time, and 2 weeks of sick days. Although the pay is good, being a nanny is actually very hard work. Compared to my office job in the Mental Health field, nannying is much harder but for me…it’s way more fulfilling. I would hate for you to think nannying is the same thing as babysitting because it’s not. Nannying is much more responsibility and work.  

Post # 11
Member
6510 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

FutureMrsB123:  I like my job but I’m certainly not passionate about it and even though I like it, it’s still emotionally draining at times. I would think that working with a kid/kids could also be emotionally draining.

$5/hour for babysitting is very cheap. Also, as you pointed out- you will need to claim that money to take out loans and/or get approved for apartments. You will then likely have to pay taxes and that will decrease your earnings even further. I was making $10/hour as a 14 year old when I was sitting at home watching tv with some neighbor’s kids. I would also advise against meeting up with friends or your FI while watching other people’s kids.

I would take the receptionist position. Once that ends in October that will give you the experience to find another receptionist type position. 

Post # 13
Member
1400 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

FutureMrsB123:  You could take the receptionist job for now, and in the mean time set up a child care profile on a website like care.com, and browse positions. You might be surprised at what you can find. At the very least, you can probably find someone willing to pay you minimum wage, which in the US is at least 7.25/hr, depending on the state.

Post # 15
Member
1400 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

FutureMrsB123:  5 untaxed and 15 taxed still isn’t the same thing though. I’m working as a nanny, full-time for $15/hr before taxes, fully on the books. I love it and it’s rewarding but also challenging, and the best job I’ve had so far. It’s not a career for me either, but it’s better than being a receptionist, in my opinion.

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