(Closed) Baking bread

posted 8 years ago in Catholic
Post # 3
Member
636 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2009

Very nice! I’ve never heard of this, we just used the regular communion hosts, but it sounds like a very nice personal touch 🙂

Post # 4
Member
853 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

very cool! Anything you can do to make it personal is worth it. Plus, baking is always a great opportunity to share (and flirt!) with the FI before the wedding.

Post # 5
Member
2867 posts
Sugar bee

Oh we should ask our priest about this!  Fiance loves baking special artisan breads, although I’m sure there is a special recipe (I kind of remember learning about it in RCIA).

Post # 6
Member
4123 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

WOAH – back up a second….

  1. Communion bread has to be “special” in that it is unleavened. i.e. No yeast and as far as I think, nothing BUT wheat and water.
  2. For things other than “wafers” please be aware that you and your guests will drop and trample upon what I affectionately call, “Jesus Crumbs.” As we believe the bread is turned into the body of Christ, we should safeguard that every “crumb” is consumed or treated with upmost reverence.
  3. Def. nothing “artisan” about it.

Unless you have the specific recipe to make proper bread and make individual small ‘wafers’ to be consumed crumb-less, this is wrong.
Personalization within our weddings is wonderful and beautiful, just as we are all beautiful for our unique attributes, however, this is ONE thing that really isn’t up for ‘personalization’ and change.

Post # 8
Member
1458 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2015

I don’t think it matters for a personal wedding, but cannon law says…

 

The bread must be only wheat and recently made so that there is no danger of spoiling.

The instruction Redemptionis Sacramentum further specifies:

[48.] The bread used in the celebration of the Most Holy Eucharistic Sacrifice must be unleavened, purely of wheat, and recently made so that there is no danger of decomposition. It follows therefore that bread made from another substance, even if it is grain, or if it is mixed with another substance different from wheat to such an extent that it would not commonly be considered wheat bread, does not constitute valid matter for confecting the Sacrifice and the Eucharistic Sacrament. It is a grave abuse to introduce other substances, such as fruit or sugar or honey, into the bread for confecting the Eucharist. Hosts should obviously be made by those who are not only distinguished by their integrity, but also skilled in making them and furnished with suitable tools.

Post # 9
Member
1160 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

I’ve also been to a non-wafer church. This is something that is OK’d by your priest so it sounds legit & is a lovely idea. At one church I go to sometimes they have an acolyte/altar kid hold a charger underneath each receiver’s hand to catch Eucharist crumbs.

Also, unbleached white flour is wheat flour with the germ/endosperm (i think) removed.

Post # 10
Member
2821 posts
Sugar bee

Sounds lovely and like you’ve done your research and have a good recipe, maybe try it out before making it in big quantities.  I know some nuns make homemade wafers for communion if you get stressed at the end but most churches I’ve gone to buy it from a store (not sure how fresh it can be in that case). 

For all those giving you a hard time, Jesus was a minister to not just the rich but also the poor and needy and possibly he was even a minister to both the good cooks and the not as good cooks.  I know of no where in the Bible where it says whoa to you who make poor unleavened bread.  Of course you should treat something holy with reverence, but it sounds like you’re doing that and I certainly don’t think you need wafer corporation (who knows how lovingly those wafers were made) to make it holy and appropriate. 

And KLP, she wasn’t the one who called it artisan, but it is a correct term since artisan applied to food products means made by hand and not by machine, and made by hand seems a bit more in the spirit of the original communion.

Post # 11
Member
1160 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

@troubled–Amen!

Post # 12
Member
2867 posts
Sugar bee

DOUBLE POST

Post # 13
Member
2867 posts
Sugar bee

@KLP2010:  There is a special recipe and some dioceses allow you to bake your bread.  I called it artisan b/c my Fiance makes bread by hand.  @Troubled is correct and @Goldfishpie.  It’s unleavened and wheat.  As for crumbs, the corporal will catch all of it as it’s broken.

Post # 14
Member
4123 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

Perhaps my entire post should be read. (especially as I was the first to mention it had to be wheat/water only).

“Unless you have the specific recipe to make proper bread and make individual small ‘wafers’ to be consumed crumb-less”

We had a church locally that used to make their own bread. You would think catholics would know to consume all the crumbs, but the reality was that every week people would wipe the crumbs off their hands on their clothing or brush their hands off after. The diocese has since mandated this church to use a wafer instead after each priest that visited was horrified by this.

Again, as I said, a special recipe must be followed. IF you have this recipe, as I mentioned (and as you now have stated, but didn’t before) that’s one thing. 

The artisan comment was @beekiss2: because the way you made it sound, was that your FI loves to makes all kinds of breads and you didn’t know if there was a certain kind that was mandated or not. I was picturing herbed breads and the like. 

Obviously, the canon is being followed, however, that wasn’t given in the OP or subsequent posts. I’m sorry if I misunderstood the lack of info. 

Post # 15
Member
2867 posts
Sugar bee

@KLP2010:  Yeah he makes all types of breads usually without herbs but I knew there was a recipe.  My RCIA instructor and priest went over it when we did the tour of the Church.

I definitely think there was a misunderstanding.

Post # 16
Member
2821 posts
Sugar bee

@KLP2010:  I did read your entire post.  It’s one thing to say though here’s some guidelines to follow when there’s a lack of info but instead it sounded like harsh assumptions were being made on your part (the WHOA back up for a second, this is wrong, def. nothing “artisan” about it comments), especially as she said she had permission. 

I don’t usually scold other peoples responses but I do feel like religion has such a bad rap right now it hurts when I see negative comments directed at someone trying to enjoy their faith.

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