Barking Complaint

posted 3 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
1083 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

I posted this recently but the same thing happened to my FI and me, except it was a note from our neighbor. The dog in question never barked when we were around so we were completely surprised. However, we ended up getting a bark collar and following up with the neighbor a few days later and he said he hadn’t heard him bark since. 

Even barking for an hour or so after you guys leave can be really annoying for neighbors. Our dog learned after one shock with the bark collar not to bark with it on. The battery on it has actually been dead for a long time but he doesn’t know the difference.

I’d just try the collar and see if it works. It’s much better than being that annoying neighbor or having animal control called on you. We also got a collar which can be adjusted super low so the shock is really just a tiny vibration (FI and I tried it on ourselves). It’s not painful and just acts as a reminder for them to behave when you aren’t around.

Good luck!

Post # 4
Member
2546 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

absolutely try the collar. it’s SO annoying to hear a dog barking and why would your neighbors make it up?

Post # 5
Member
432 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2009

Well, it is possible that she’s barking for an extended period.  Do you live in a house or apartment?  I had a roommate once who adopted a lab and it barked constantly for hours on end when she left it alone.  Dogs need to be taught that their owners love them and will always return to them before they’ll be quiet when home alone.  This can take some time. But you can start training her by going outside for a few minutes, then coming back.  Then leave for a little longer and then a little longer.  Everytime you come back, don’t shower her with love right away.  Ignore her for a few minutes to let her know that it wasn’t a big deal that you left.  If she thinks you coming and going is a big deal, she’ll be more likely to get upset when you leave.  Dog’s brains work weird!  As for the complaint, maybe you could go around to all your neighbors and explain the situation to them.  Tell them you’re in the process of training the dog and it shouldn’t be too long before she’s settled in.

Post # 7
Member
724 posts
Busy bee

Do you have a video camera you can leave on for a spell while you’re out of the house?

People don’t contact animal control for occaisional or quiet barking. While I can appreciate that you haven’t witnessed the behaviors that prompted the notice, I think it’s really important to suspend your disbelief and start tackling this issue before a formal complaint is filed. If evidence is needed for that, go ahead and get it for yourself.

Figuring out what’s causing the behavior will be a help in determining the effective steps to take with this dog (the camera, again, can help here). She’s still new in the household so implementing changes won’t be a disruption of long-standing habits at this point, which is great!

LOADS of exercise will be your friend, no matter what is setting your pup off. I’d start with that as soon as you can; if your dog doesn’t nap immediately after exercise, you can burn off more energy! Tired dogs bark much, much less.

Post # 9
Member
432 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2009

I agree with the exercise point.  Take her for looooong walk before going to work and hopefully that’ll calm her down.  Shock collars are expensive and don’t always work.  My ex boyfriend had one on his dog and it didn’t stop her from barking.  And everytime she tried to bark, she let out this really painful sounding cry.  It was sad. 

Post # 10
Member
469 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

We had someone in our apartment who had a dog that barked all.day.long. It was painful (especially since it started at 5am sometimes and often times didn’t end until 11pm if they were out in the evening.) Once we talked to them, they started playing Beethoven for him and we have only heard him occasionaly since. I would try music first and if not resort to the collar. They also sell ones that spray citronella which dogs don’t like. Similarly to a PP, the collar no longer contains any citronella but the dog remembers.

Post # 12
Member
724 posts
Busy bee

@melisandescott:  Great! Sounds like you’re on the right track.

I do not like the use of shock collars on dogs, and would recommend that you try crate training her (if you haven’t started already) to address anxiety about being left alone. Especially if you’re planning to give her lots and lots of exercise, then it will be very natural for her to take to a quiet place to sleep while you and your husband are out of the house, and she will find comfort in knowing that she isn’t being “bad.”

It’s a bit unfair of your neighbors to not talk to you when you’ve only had her for a week, but at least now you’re aware that there’s this to work on. I wouldn’t worry about it too much. They chose the passive-aggressive route, and you’re doing the best you can with this new knowledge. Animal control isn’t going to penalize you for these growing pains with your shelter dog so early after adoption.

Good luck!

Post # 13
Member
5445 posts
Bee Keeper

So wait. Was this an official notice from the city or just some person who decided to print out and highlight the city policy? 

Post # 16
Member
42472 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

@melisandescott:  Many people do not respond well at all to any suggestion that the behavior of their pet is less than perfect. I’m guessing that might be why the neighbor tried the anonymous route first rather than risk a confrontation with you at the front door.

Do you have any place you could post a notice thanking them for letting you know about the problem and that you are working on it? You could take notices to your nearest neighbors and tell them the same thing.

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