Bees, I'm feeling extremely discouraged :S (kinda long)

posted 3 years ago in Career
Post # 2
Member
2493 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

Wait, your graduation is contingent on employment for 4 months? Why isn’t your program helping you with that requirement? 

Post # 4
Member
221 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

I don’t know if you’re looking for advice, but netwoking is huge! Do you know anyone currently working in HR in that area? If so, call them up and ask to meet for coffee.

If not, you can still cold call people in HR. Use company websites to get contact info and tell them you’re trying to get into the field and that you’d like to take them for a coffee and pick their brain a little.

Don’t ask about openings at their company! Ask how they got their first job, what they look for in a new hire, if they ever have difficulties finding qualified applicants and what the majority of applicants are usually lacking. Ask them what their favorite aspect of HR is and what’s the most rewarding part of the job. Ask if they know anyone that would be willing to meet with you and get an email introduction. Once you get in with a few people you have a way higher chance of someone recognizing your name and calling for an interview. Also, follow up after you’ve submitted your resume.

Post # 5
Member
2493 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

That’s pretty rotten of your program. Most programs do a lot of legwork to help their students–they establish relationships with companies and have personal contacts with people there, and in some cases, the company may only advertise with certain schools for certain internships/positions. 

Well, that sucks. 

Are you paying the school money for every semester, even if you can’t get a job? Because I would set a time limit on how long you are willing to look–the policy sounds vaguely predatory to me (requiring students get jobs before they can graduate and then also charging them tuition for every semester they are enrolled in while they are looking for a job without getting them proper job search support). As much as it would suck to drop out after a year of work, think very hard about paying for more than say, two more semesters just to get a diploma from this place.

a couple questions:

1) Are you specifically looking for 4-month appointments, and/or are you telling prospective employers you are only looking for a 4-month term? No one is going to hire you if that’s the case. 

2) Can you look outside of where you live to other cities within Canada (or even the US, depending on work visa requirements and your school requirements). You might have to cast a wider net–and even if you have to live hours away from your FI, it’s only temporary. 

Sorry, hon. Keep your chin up and keep trying. Something will come along. 

Post # 6
Member
339 posts
Helper bee

Question, why is the place you volunteered last year in an HR department meaningless? Its experience thats all the matters. Voluntary or not you did it and you should tout the experience gained from there. I had to send out about 100 resumes and cover letters and have 33 interviews before I found my current job… I promise you, just when you feel like giving up, do a little more and it will happen for you.

I would also suggest going unconventional routes of employment like search for jobs at hospitals and law firms and the education dept and library systems and corporations, everyone needs HR personnel, so look a lot harder and look where the rest of the students in your program arent. I live in Minnesota but have been on the east coast most of my life went to school in DC, hardly anyone in my class wanted to move to minnesota and would have rather be jobless than try out a new state… Im not suggesting you move…just to take the road less travelled.  Good luck to you!

Post # 8
Member
636 posts
Busy bee

I would also recommend getting another outside opinion on your resume from someone who’s hired staff before. I suspect a couple things: The job postings the program/school has been giving you are crap (and you should look outside those postings for sure) and/or that your resume and cover letter aren’t as strong as you think. If you aren’t already doing this, you should be heavily customizing your CL and possibly also your resume for each and every job. It’s very time consuming but it does make a big difference IMO. I would also recommend focusing your cover letter on how the hiring company would specificially benefit from hiring you (not the other way around – I see so many cover letters talk about how the person applying would benefit from the experience, the job, career boost, etc blah blah blah – that’s not what someone hiring wants to hear). Make it clear that you really want the job and will go to extra effort to try to get it, and also tell them how you will make your future boss’s life easier/company’s better in some way.

Also, not sure how HR associations work but you should join one if you feel it would help you network. Many of them do industry events that you could network at!

Post # 9
Member
3637 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2015

Are you on LinkedIn? If not, I would start a profile ASAP. You never know what connections you’ll be able to make through it but at the very least you’ll have the online prescence should an recruiters want to look you up. 

Does the placement have to be paid? Could you volunteer for those 4 months? Possibly with the agreement that they hire you full time after those 4 months (essentially they get to train you without paying you). I realise that that is not ideal but at least hopefully you’d graduate. 

Have you put the word out to family and friends on what you are looking for? Again, you never know what you’ll find that way. 

Post # 10
Member
695 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2014

I have to wonder if your school has a special relationship with any companies.  At my university there were some companies that got their pick of grads from like business management and HR.  At my school they called it the career consulting office.  I would check in with them and see what they say.  If there are these special companies I would contact them myself.

I do know what you mean that even the non paid internships are difficult to get.  I got turned down for a couple of those myself back in the day.  I hate to even say this but if all else falls through you can contact Target.  I know they deal with a large amount of grads and are open to internships.  Also I don’t know where your located but stores like Macy’s and Dillards are known to have a lot of internships moving through their HR department.

Post # 11
Member
1500 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

Network, network, network girl! None of my jobs ever came to me because I just applied – by the time a job has been posted online, it means they’ve exhausted an insider search and a friend of friend search and are now casting a wider net. They all came because I had an insider connection – and that’s really how the business world works. Networking doesn’t mean stuffy cocktail hours – it means reaching out to all your friends, friends of friends, past coworkers, alumni, anyone who has a connection to you who would be willing to help you out. 

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