Bees that don't have a dishwasher …

posted 3 years ago in Home
Post # 3
Member
300 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 2014

Grew up without one, and still don’t have one.I was taught that glassware and the least soiled dishes goes first . Note everything is usually rinsed off first with lukewarm water before it gets into the soapy water. 

So glasses/cups.

Next is plates ,already rinsed so that most of the dirt and grease is off.

Then bowls, same principle. 

Next cutting boards etc/tupperware

Final,pots and pans also rinsed out already.

Cutlery is in the water from the start ,and washed at the end . 

I hope that helps, that is just the way I was brought up to do it, and more than likely someone else has a better or different way to do it 🙂

Post # 4
Member
11772 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: May 2013

@Stace126:  I work in childcare, and we learned at a first aid certification seminar hosted by a 32 year EMT vet that Chlorox wipes are God’s gift to cleanliness.

You can eat 15 before they’re dangerous, and then they’re more worried about you passing them than the chemical exposure!

So I wouldn’t be at all worried about using them on raw meat surfaces (especially if it’s porous, like a wood block)

I wash animal bowls by hand (no scrub brush), scrub brush for dishes, and a paper towel for our meat-cutting surfaces (I wish it with a paper towel so I can throw it away after).

Post # 5
Member
2630 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

I just make sure to rinse out the sponge really well after each use and make sure to store it in a way that allows it to dry out. I also wash it out in vinegar (my cleaner of choice) every couple of days. You don’t need to worry about using bleach on your sponges and scrubbers as long as you rinse them well. After all, quite a bit of dishwasher detergent includes bleach. 

Post # 6
Member
629 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

I echo PPs, and also be sure to use an antibacterial dish soap 

Post # 7
Member
968 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

I have a sponge for dishes and a sponge for “other”. We don’t eat meat so there’s no contamination danger there. And I don’t wash my dog’s dish in the kitchen sink! I’ll scrub it out in the laundry sink with a paper towel or doggie wash cloth.

Post # 8
Member
309 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I’ve never really thought about it this way.  I just figure if its soapy its clean.

Post # 9
Member
9949 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

One tip: if you’re feeling lazy and don’t want to clean up all the dishes right away, at least rinse them off — it’ll make everything sooooo much easier afterwards.  

Post # 10
Member
3280 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I have always had a dishwasher, even my college dorm had a dishwasher! Now we just bought a house and don’t have one. I have a separate brush for dishes and other cleaning. We just rinse them out, scrub them, then let them air dry on a rack. I’ve never really thought about the sanitary aspect. 

Post # 11
Member
368 posts
Helper bee

I have never had a dishwasher. I hate doing dishes -_- I have to wash them for 5-6 people at the house and it really adds up. Umm you can microwave your sponge to kill most of the bad stuff. And you can use a bleach solution to clean up chicken messes…that is recommended anyways. Like make a bleach solution in the sink and then soak those raw meat dishes in it, then drain the sink and wash everything normally with soap and hot water. Or you can use lysol or clorox type kitchen wipes on contaminated items that touched raw meat:) I am OCD and in reality, even I know that the mechanical action of scrubbing with soap and RUNNING water on the dishes (people who fill up the sink and use the same water to wash them all gross me out) will physically remove the bacteria. You do need to microwave the sponge, though, and wring it out all the way before putting it down so the bacteria can’t grow in the water in the sponge. 

Post # 12
Member
3394 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

@Stace126:  I don’t have an electric dishwasher, but I have a teenage one! lol. Eat at your own risk at my house. I don’t use sponges, ever. Ew. Just ew. I do not have pets, but I would have a separate scrubby thing for the dog dish, I don’t know about the germs, it’s just the thought of it. Since the scrubby thing can be pretty well rinsed through I’m not concerned about washing the meat cutting board. I’m probably less concerned with germs than most. I think too much germ killing leads to weakened immune systems. 

Post # 13
Member
1822 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2013 - Pavilion overlooking golf course scenery, reception at banquet hall

A good point to remember is that you don’t necessarily have to *kill* the germs, but just make sure they are removed from the dishes. Average dish soaps do a good job of unsticking particles and germs from the dish surface, and if you rinse really well, all the germs simply go down the drain. Dead or alive germs doesn’t matter anymore!

Post # 14
Member
2057 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014 - British Columbia

I actually like BeeOi’s way of doing it!

I wash my dishes in dish soap + vinegar + hot water. I have two plastic cutting boards: one designated for Meat and another for vegetables. I only use my wood board for rolling out pastry/dough.

As well, there are two designated Norwex cloths in the kitchen. (One for the induction stove; another for the rest of the kitchen, but not the floor) I boil my rags to death with vinegar + water to sanitize it. Norwex cloths are anti-bacterial. They’re expensive though, but could be worth investing if you disliked chemicals.

Post # 15
Member
1346 posts
Bumble bee

Antibacterial dish soap and very hot water.

Post # 16
Member
5087 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2014

Rinsing and very hot water. 

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