Being served something you shouldn't

posted 3 years ago in Wellness
  • poll: If I got something by mistake I would
    Inform my server : (61 votes)
    48 %
    Inform the manager : (39 votes)
    31 %
    Contact head office in the case of a chain : (15 votes)
    12 %
    Report them : (8 votes)
    6 %
    Just leave without saying anything : (4 votes)
    3 %
    Other : (0 votes)
  • Post # 3
    Member
    5207 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: February 2013

    @AB Bride:  It’s the diner’s responsibility to stay on top of their own health issues. The server doesn’t prepare the meals and therefore can’t be expected to really know what’s in them. In a busy restaurant they don’t have time to go back and watch the chef prepare the meal just to be sure. If a person has an allergy they go out to eat at their own risk. Frustrating? Yes, but the restaurant can only do so much to accomodate you.

    Post # 5
    Member
    5207 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: February 2013

    @AB Bride:  not that it’s right for anyone to shrug off a request, but what was the dish like? In certain cases things like anchovy paste in Caesar dressing and Worcestershire sauce or shrimp bits in egg rolls are overlooked. Some people genuinely don’t know these ingredients are there if they’re not listed in the menu description. 

    Post # 6
    Member
    42549 posts
    Honey Beekeeper
    • Wedding: November 1999

    @AB Bride:  Seems pretty straight forward to me. If you believe the server’s attitude was cavalier, you should ask to speak to the manager.

    I  wouldn’t be happy with someone going to the president of the company I work for, skipping over my  immediate supervisor, so why would I do that to anyone else?

    Frankly, if I had an allergy from which I could have an anaphylactic reaction, I would never order anything like that in a restauarant. There is no end of cross contamination in the kitchen.

    Post # 8
    Member
    2675 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: May 2014 - Madison, WI

    As far as reporting it to inspectors… in most cases they will not care. I have worked with inspectors who do sanitation checks etc at resturaunts. As long as their inspection says a place is okay, it’s okay. I would test certain food products from these places – it did not effect their grade on the inspection. They could have been serving dairy products contaminated with E. coli and still have passed their inspection because that was not technically part of the inspection. For this reason in areas where I have tested there are a list of places in my mind I would never order ice cream or soft serve from – plus it honestly makes me hesitant to eat anything else from that place.

    In terms of having this happen, I agree that if you have an allergy or intolerance going out to eat is always a risk. Some friends of mine with these issues basically have a list of places they will go out to eat because they know they’re good about checking. I went out to eat this past week with someone who was gluten free – the cook checked every ingredient in the seasoning on their chicken for her to make sure even that was gluten free. The server was very thoughtful about it too and mentioned it a few times that they had made sure to check. If a mistake had been made I would first alert the server, if the server blows it off, then I’d take it to the manager.

    Post # 9
    Member
    1965 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: September 2013

    i get annoyed. Especially if its an eterie that states they cater for diatery requirements. Im lactose intollerant and quite regulary get meals which dairy either in the garnish or in the actual content of the dish. I generally kindly inform the server of the mistake and ask for a replacment. 

    My husband has a nut allergy which is far more serious than my intollerance. He has received a cake which he checked first if it contained traces of nuts that had nuts ground in and of course he had a reaction and couldnt breathe. In this case we received compensation but we didnt have to ak, the restaurant gave it off their own back.         

    Post # 10
    Member
    42549 posts
    Honey Beekeeper
    • Wedding: November 1999

    @AB Bride:  As I said, I wouldn’t have ordered anything like that. I didn’t say that you should have known about the shrimp in the vegetarian dish.

    If I had an anaphylactic food allergy, I would only order simple grilled things like meat, chicken vegetables etc. The risks increase exponentially in dishes with sauces, casseroles etc. It’s simply not worth the risk.

    Post # 11
    Member
    3778 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: October 2012

    I would tell the server. I’ve done it in the past and 9 times out of 10 the manager comes over and apologizes. If the server shrugs it off, then I would ask to speak with the manager. No need to bring it higher unless the manager acts like a tool about it. But I’ve never had that happen. Most restaruant managers I’ve spoken to are extremely nice and apologetic if anything goes wrong. 

     

    Post # 13
    Hostess
    9919 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper
    • Wedding: May 2014

    @AB Bride:  I would inform my server, who should inform the manager who should then come over – This is my experience having worked in restaurants.  Depending on the server’s attitude I would inform the manager myself.  If the manager has a poor attitude or it’s a recurring problem I would then inform the head office if it was a chain. 

    I know we had to ask if it was an allergy or preference if someone asked for a subsitution etc.

    Post # 15
    Member
    2696 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: June 2012

    I worked in a restaurant, and it is very much a responsibility of BOTH the person ordering and the chef/wait staff to ensure people know what is in their food.

    If somone has a shellfish allergy and informs the staff, orders something specifically stating that they cannot have it come in contact with seafood, the chef MUST ensure that happens. If they cannot ensure that the meal will not come in contact with the allergen, they need to inform the customer.

    The chef I worked for took food alergies and sensitivites VERY seriously. He would lose his shit if we did anything to compromise the health of somone who had an allergy or intolerance.

    I wish there was somwhere you could report it, but honestly, I think all you can do is bring it up to management to try to express how serious the situation could be.

    Post # 16
    Hostess
    9919 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper
    • Wedding: May 2014

    @Aquaria:  during my restuatant training we were specifically told about the anchovy paste in the ceasar dressing for this reason.  I actually argued with a server over it once, they kept saying I was wrong.

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