(Closed) Best way to collect addresses?

posted 4 years ago in Etiquette
Post # 3
Member
9174 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013 - Rocky Mountains USA

@SunshineSmiles:  Check out postable.com!  It’s awesome.  You sign up (free), you get a special link for your address book on their website, you email or facebook the link out to everyone, and they go there to fill in all the information.  Super handy.

ETA:  In case it’s not clear – the best part about this is that it saves you the hassle of compiling everyone’s addresses yourself.  They enter it into the database and it’s all listed there for you.  

No one we’re inviting would think this kind of thing is tacky, but I guess it depends on your guests.

Post # 4
Member
199 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

I think people who see email as tacky need to get with the 21st century, personally 🙂

Post # 5
Member
739 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@SunshineSmiles:  For friends, we simply either emailed, texted, or sent facebook messages to them asking for addresses. For family members, we relied on our parents to get addresses. Sort of awkward, but whatever. It had to be done. 

Post # 6
Member
5015 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: September 2013

@starz88962:  Same with me, and just put them all in an Excel sheet. There didn’t really seem to be a great way to do it…

Post # 7
Member
853 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2012

@SunshineSmiles:  My best friend texted me.  I think I emailed her.  It’s not tacky, and I’ve had it done to me numberous times.

Post # 8
Member
853 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2012

@RunnerBride13:  For us that Excel sheet was absolutely the way to keep track of it.  Down the line we added a column for if there was a gift and a box to check off when the thank you note was sent.  It was great.

Post # 9
Member
5015 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: September 2013

@LittleCricket:  Oh that’s a good idea! I forgot about needing them again for thank-yous!

Post # 10
Member
396 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

I don’t think emailing people (or using facebook or texting closer friends) is rude at all.  It would be really time-consuming to have to call everyone! Personally I would actually be more likely to be annoyed if someone called me about this rather than just sending me an email, but I do not like talking on the phone!  It’s also more likely to be accurate if you get the address written out for you in an email.

Just a note, if you do decide to email, sending a group email is fine in my opinion but make sure to put everyone’s email address in the BCC line so that your guests can’t A) see who you’ve invited, B) end up sending spam to everyone on the email.

Post # 11
Member
1686 posts
Bumble bee

@SunshineSmiles:  My dear niece Penelope always answers, when people ask her for the best way to raise such lovely teenagers, is to start thirteen years ago. Similarly, the best way to collect addresses is to start managing your visiting book (or its modern equivalent the comprehensive cloud-backed-up electronic contact list) as soon as you start functioning socially as an independent adult. Which should be sometime between your sweet-sixteen birthday party and moving out from your parental home.

Nice socially-adept mothers (or grandmothers, godmothers, or spinster aunts) will give a girl a partially-filled-out visiting-book as a coming-of-age present; containing the proper names, titles, addresses, phone-numbers, email addresses, birthdays, anniversaries and websites of relatives and old family friends. Then it is up to you to send Christmas greetings to those people regularly (or just notes or some other kind of greeting if you don’t do Christmas cards) which will encourage them to send greetings back including, among other things, their change-of-address notifications. When you meet new people, you make a point of getting to know them and finding out those things — well, name and title, address and email at minimum: birthdays and anniversaries are a bit personal to ask of new acquaintances. If you like nice socially-adept mentors to kick-start your visiting-book, then you get started from scratch as soon as some-one rings a bell for you that it’s a non-optional social responsibility to know acquaintances basic contact information. Don’t you wish someone had hinted to you to start this exercise prior to last Christmas?

Well, good news: you do not actually need to send Save The Date cards out at all. You certainly do not need to send them to people you do not know well enough to know where they live. Asking someone to “save the date” is most appropriate if they are such a dear close connexion that you cannot dream of getting married without their presence. I am hoping that if someone is that dear to you, that you do know their address.

Failing that, the local phone book is a good place to start. So is asking them directly — when it is this early, they might assume you are just planning to send Christmas cards. Asking your mother, grandmother, et cetera for their contacts is another good help. E-mail, text, and Facebook private message are perfectly acceptable, as is direct verbal conversation over coffee. And then, once you do have titles and addresses, keep them up by using them from time to time for nice social notes.

 

 

Post # 12
Member
2810 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

@lolot:  +1. we plan to use it as well (:

Post # 13
Member
514 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@SunshineSmiles:  I asked my parents/grandparents for the ones they had, then his family for their list, then our friends I just texted/emailed, because we are only inviting like our five closest friends.

Post # 14
Member
911 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2013 - The Down Town Club, Philadelphia

We used Postable, and it was awesome. 

 

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