Birth Control Questions

posted 2 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 3
Member
3756 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

If you want a reliable source, talk to a doctor.

Post # 4
Member
2515 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

MrsWoods47: I think your better off re framing your questions

Find out what drugs cause the changes in uterine lining then work to see what BC options are without that particular drug (progesterone) 

I would just call my doctor.

Post # 6
Member
555 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: March 2013

MrsWoods47:  I may be wrong but I think for birth control to be at the 98% it has to thin the lining. I would suggest just using condoms if your looking for something that doesn’t mess with your body and doesn’t doesn’t thin your lining. 

I get it, condoms suck! But it’s the best way to get what you want:) 

Post # 7
Member
448 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

Have you looked into Fertility Awareness? It’s amazing! Condoms and diaphragms can be great too.

Post # 10
Member
448 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

MrsWoods47:  

You are correct. Preventing implantation is one of the three ways the BCP works.

Post # 13
Member
448 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

Rachel631:  

Thanks for that paper. It was interesting. However, the jury is not out on this at all. 

“The COCP prevents conception by acting on:

  • The hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis to suppress synthesis and secretion of follicle-stimulating hormone and the mid-cycle surge of luteinising hormone, thus inhibiting the development of ovarian follicles and ovulation.
  • Cervical mucus to prevent penetration of sperm.
  • The endometrium to inhibit blastocyst implantation.”

http://www.patient.co.uk/doctor/combined-oral-contraceptive-pill-first-prescription

“Hormonal contraceptives reduce endometrial growth, so it is theoretically possible that they may also block conception by interfering with implantation. However, since the other mechanisms of action are very effective at preventing fertilization, it is difficult to know what role, if any, inhibiting implantation has to play in contraceptive efficacy.”

http://courses.washington.edu/conj/bess/contraception/contraception.htm

Post # 14
Member
448 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

MrsWoods47:  

I would read as many books as possible on the subject. Taking Charge of your Fertility is brilliant and I would join the forums at ovusoft.com. Also, it is extremely important that you pay attention to the rule of using a barrier for a full three cycles before you use FAM alone. Otherwise, you could end up dealing with an unplanned pregnancy.

Feel free to pm me if you would like to chat further about this.

  • This reply was modified 2 years, 3 months ago by  Bainise2013.
Post # 15
Member
7664 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

Bainise2013:  The problem is a mathematical one, because even in the case of a breakthrough ovulation, existing literature indicates that of the fertilised ovum which fail to implant and thrive are easily accounted for by other (non BCP related) biological mechanisms. A quick look at Google Scholar recently hasn’t given me a single academic paper which can provide any evidence that BCP prevent implantation.

Of course, such evidence would be almost impossible to provide, because we would be talking about highly unusual circumstances anyway, and it is very difficult to gather data on unusual biological phenomena. Even IF it does happen, we would be talking about a minute fraction of a percentage, and it’s almost impossible to correct for that type of minute number of cases scientifically/statistically. The key phrase was the one you gave:

since the other mechanisms of action are very effective at preventing fertilization, it is difficult to know what role, if any, inhibiting implantation has to play in contraceptive efficacy” [underlining/emboldening mine]<br />

The idea that this could occur is purely a theoretical one… there’s no evidence at all to support it.

The only reason I read this stuff in the first place was because many years ago, back in the days when I was a medical student, I wanted to choose a form of BC which would not harm my baby in the case I had an “oops” pregnancy. It soon became clear that forms of BC which harm your “oops” the most seriously do so because they affect implantation, which in turn affects the formation of the umbilical cord. This is the main reason that the IUD is associated with more birth defects than BCP, for example. So I became familiar with the literature. Of course, that was a long time ago, but my quick look recently still hasn’t turned up any evidence to the contrary.

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