(Closed) Birth Plan Feedback

posted 6 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 3
Member
5428 posts
Bee Keeper

Sounds like you covered everything.

Post # 4
Member
664 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

This seems very thorough.

Post # 5
Member
1434 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: February 2010

@Mrs Sarah McK:  sounds good. They need to be TOLD to not perform a hysterectomy?! I would think they’d ask you for consent either way, but I guess its good to be clear.

Post # 7
Member
275 posts
Helper bee

Looks like you put a lot of thought into your birth plan!

 

Just for coversation sake, I wonder how many ladies come in with a birthing plan and how the nurses feel about following it? Any nurses willing to chime in? If you don’t mind, OP.

Post # 9
Member
3773 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: December 1999

@tcanne:  I have never made one for eiter one of my pregnancys, but I have always known my doctor would be the one delivering so I didn’t feel it necesary. As a nurse (not L & d), from my friends who are say they usually go out the window. The hospitla has policies that I see would effect almost all of the plans on here,so I hope people aren’t upset if theing can’t go the way they would prefer. ex- Some places have to have the arms strapped during surgery as a safety issue, if there is an emergency with baby there might not be room for them to work efficiently and have Dad there. And then there are some things that are common practice- not using forceps unless necesay, obtaining consent for anesthesia (unless it is an emergency).

 

@Mrs Sarah McK:  I think one of the most important htings you said in this entire document was the very first bullet about a teaching hospital, alot of peole forget about this:)

Post # 10
Member
275 posts
Helper bee

You know, it makes total sense if you’re not sure if you’ll end up with your doctor or not. I didn’t even think about that. I didn’t do one, my doctor said she would be on call until her leave a few weeks after my due date. I had discussed with her what exactly I wanted before hand. To be honest though, I wasn’t very detailed. Just anxious to have baby come out the safest way possible.

Post # 11
Member
879 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

I didn’t do a birth plan for either of my pregnancies.  I know women who have been utterly distraught that their birth did not go the way that it was planned.  And I didn’t want to fall into that trap.

I did have an idea where I stood on certain issues such as that I wanted my partner with me at all times, that I did not want an epidural and that I did want the injection after the birth so that I didn’t have continued labour with the placenta.

But other than that I really went with the flow.  If they needed a decision or had a concern the staff talked to both of us about it as it occured.  One example is with my first born she wasn’t breech, but she was backwards.  So her spine was against my spine when it shouldnt of been.  So they gave me options on techniques to use to encourage her to spin the right way.

I feel like I made informed deicions as I needed to, and then didn’t fill me head with details which in the end weren’t important.  And there is no way that anything would be done to either the baby or myself without my express consent, or if I was unable to give it, my partners consent.  Our local hospitals triple check and explain everything before proceeding.

Post # 13
Member
1038 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

I’m not an L&D nurse but when I worked as a mother/baby nurse the ones that had a birth plan, usually wasn’t really followed.  All the stuff you have about not doing things without a consent….they cannot do without your consent anyways.  As for performing newborn exams on your chest….that isn’t very realistic tbh.  To get a better look at the baby and be able to fully assess baby…it would be easier(and much quicker) to let them be able to lay baby on a flat surface. Also, if baby has to go to the nursery or NICU many hospitals will not let Dad come with baby right away.  Many have windows to where Dad can watch baby and I’m sure they will gladly let him come in once they get baby settled in.  Understand when a baby comes into the nursery/NICU the nurses have things they have to do right away to assess baby and make sure he/she is breathing ok, etc, etc.  And sometimes family, while we know they mean well and are certainly concerned, get in our way of initially trying to help baby. 

 

Also, if your baby has to spend time in the NICU (let’s hope this isn’t the case) you still don’t want him/her to have a pacifier?  Pacifiers really are not evil and actually are of great comfort to a newborn, esp in a NICU setting. I understand your concerns about nipple confustion and all…but I’ve cared for many babies that were able to breastfeed just fine and still took a pacifier.

 

And for circumcising….many hospitals don’t do them inpatient anymore.  It is an insurance thing…you usually do it outpatient after you and baby go home so you likely don’t have to worry about that. 

Post # 15
Member
1038 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

@Mrs Sarah McK:  No problem.  I think it is great that you have taken into consideration the things important to you and your husband for the delivery of your baby.  And most hospitals today really do try to respect their patient’s wishes.  If they are unable to it isn’t cause they just don’t want to honor your birth plan.  Just please be prepared that things may not go by the birth plan.  Let it be a guide to how you want things(and yours looks like you have considered that). 

 

I remember one…the parents would not allow us to give vit k or ointment to the baby’s eyes and wouldn’t let us check baby’s blood sugar.  They said each poke was a risk for infection.  They also wanted us to rub in the vernix and not bathe baby.  They didn’t want baby’s first bath to be given for a couple days(I’m sorry…but that is just disgusting). 

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