BRCA1 and BRCA2 test for cancer gene. (NWR)

posted 2 years ago in Wellness
Post # 2
Member
101 posts
Blushing bee

sorry i haven’t 🙁

Post # 3
Member
140 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

SweetBeets:  I’m supposed to be getting this test done as well due to my grandmother being postive along with being a cancer surviver. My sister tested negative but my mother hasn’t and won’t be tested so I still have a chance of getting a postive result. I couldn’t get a clear answer from my insurance company but my doctor said if I am approved to take the test by my insurance (which I was) there may be a cap price of like 500 dollars but she wasn’t giving me an exact number. 

I’m planning on talking to the office genetic nurse when I go in next week for my first prenatal appointment. Its much easier talking in person than over the phone. 

Post # 4
Member
2675 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2014 - Madison, WI

The cost for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing usually ranges from several hundred to several thousand dollars. Insurance policies will really vary as to whether the cost of testing is covered. For me personally, my insurance would cover it 100% as long as I recived pre-authorization to get the testing done. Many insurance companies have developed guidelines indicating what criteria must be met in order for them to cover BRCA testing. These criteria typically involve a combination of family, and sometimes personal, history of cancer. I would call your insurance company directly, explain the situation, and see if they cover any it or not. If not you might be able to work something out with the provider of the test, either reduced cost or a payment plan.

Both my grandmother and great aunt (her sister) died from breast cancer. Both of them were tested in the hospital but we were told neither had the BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation, so none of the women in my family ended up getting tested.

Post # 7
Member
11740 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

My mom is a BC survivor, and was not tested for the gene, and neither was I, or my sister.  Her doctor and the doctor’s billing department said that it could be used in the future by the insurance company to deny certain treatments or to entirely drop her coverage.  I’m not sure how they came up with this, since pre-existing conditions are covered under the ACA reforms, but that’s what she was told.  Instead of risking future health care, she opted not to do it.  Granted, this was about two years ago, so the laws/guidelines/regulations may well have changed since then.

I’d definitely double check and make sure that’s not the case anymore! 

Post # 8
Member
140 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

SweetBeets:  My last gyno doctors visit I had to fill out a paper stating my grandmother was postive but my sister was negative and then my doctors office called my insurance company with the information. A week later my doctors office called and told me they approved me. Family history has a lot to do with it. 

Post # 9
Member
3280 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I’ve learned about it in genetics course. If you have the mutated gene (which your mother or grandmother must have for you to have basically) you have a 40-80% of developing breast cancer at some point. Those genes are also linked with an increase in ovarian cancers. It is true that companies can use this information to deny you or heavily inflate insurance costs both life insurance and medical, which is true of many genes and it’s legal. 

Post # 11
Member
318 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

I’ve had the test, although I had it after I had already been diagnosed with breast cancer. It was $3,000 and my insurance did cover it because my doctor fought for them to consider it medically necessary for my treatment.

Post # 12
Member
549 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2017

The price of the test depends on the criteria you meet. If you have an immediate female family member diagnosed with breast/ovarian cancer before menopause; a male family member diagnosed with breast cancer; or family members who have already tested positive for BRCA1 or 2, it’s $600. I had all of these but I was in a genetic cancer study and they covered the cost of testing 100%. If you don’t meet those criteria it’s a couple thousand, I believe. There’s only 1 company who have patented the testing for BRCA1&2; I think that’s why it’s so expensive. 

Insurance companies cannot use the results of your test against you. It’s illegal. In some cases, if you test positive your insurance company will cover prophylactic surgeries (removal of breast and ovaries (if age permits) as preventative measures). I know my insurance does this but luckily I tested negative. If you feel you’re at higher risk schedule an appointment with a genetic counselor at a cancer center. Even though I ultimately found out I’m not at any higher risk than the rest of the population even with my family’s extensive history with cancer, I learned so much from my counselor. My sister is too scared to get tested, which I don’t understand at all. If you have the options/resources, proactively take on cancer. 

Post # 13
Member
549 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2017

GINA – Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act protects you from health insurance companies denying coverage or raising premiums based on the results of BRCA 1 & 2 testing. This passed in 2008.

It does not cover life insurance or disability insurance companies so one could deny you a policy

Post # 14
Member
10494 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

MrsN14:  Why does your mother or grandmother have to have it?  What about your father?

Post # 15
Member
889 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: March 2015 - On a Cliff Overlooking the Bay, Florida

 

SweetBeets:  I had the test done and my insurance paid 100% for it. 9 out of 10 females in my family have Breast cancer and my Maternal Aunt was just diagnosed with ovarian cancer so with me being high risk they paid for it.

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