Bringing puppy home, but in an apartment

posted 3 years ago in Pets
Post # 2
Member
3598 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

If the family friends’ dogs are fully vaccinated, she’ll be fine if they’re all in a confined yard or something with her.  I wouldn’t recommend letting a young puppy in public places where sick and unvaccinated dogs could go, though.  When my two dogs were little and we lived in an apartment, I used potty pads.  

  • This reply was modified 2 years, 7 months ago by  strawbabies.
Post # 3
Member
2565 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

I’m not a fan of potty pads, but in the case of an apartment with a not fully vaccinated puppy I would probably just use them until a few weeks past when puppy had all its vaccines.

Post # 5
Member
2052 posts
Buzzing bee

I wouldn’t recommend puppy pads in my experience. While I was in an apartment, once we started with the puppy pads we could NOT get him to stop using them, and if we took them away he would just pee where they used to be. It was awful, it took us moving to a new house with a yard to break him of the puppy pads.

As far as vaccines go, as long as the other dogs are vaccinated he should be fine. I wouldn’t take him to public places like dog parks or groomers or whatever to keep him away from unvaccinated dogs, but taking him leashed outside for potty should be fine

Edited to add that viruses don’t live long outside their host. Your puppy would have to be using the same spot to potty immediately after an infected dog to even risk catching anything. But that is also why he should be leashed at all times while he’s outside, so that you can control where he goes and make sure he’s not getting into anything he shouldn’t

Post # 6
Member
507 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2014 - Stevens Estate

katy13:  Just make sure she’s leashed so you can watch her and any dog she greets is fully vaccinated. Good luck!

Post # 7
Member
612 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

We lived in an apartment for the first year of our Vizsla’s life as well.  We got him at 9 weeks and had his second round of shots at 10 weeks.  For the first few months, we directed him to relieve himself on concrete – no grass/dirt.  I think using puppy pads indoors would have been way too confusing for him. 

As for expending her energy – I would start her training immediately.  Our boy was shy/coy for the first night, and after that, it was like a red tornado hit.  I did short sessions with him a few times a day, initially just fun things like recall/his name, paw, up, down etc.  Vizslas LOVE to learn and work for you, so the sooner you get her on your team, the easier it will be for you!  It also helps with bonding!

The idea that these are high energy dogs who need to run hours and hours a day is somewhat off.  They do need exercise, but they also need to be engaged and mentally stimulated.  They also need rules and boundaries.  If you set them early, and are consistent with them, she’ll settle in very quickly. Although it may be hard to believe it when she’s in attack mode, Vizsla’s are considered “soft dogs”, so patience, positive reinforcement, and remaining calm work best when training.

I did take my pup outside before his second round of shots – it’s so important to socialize a Vizsla.  You just have to be careful not to overwhelm her.  Look up developmental/fear periods in dogs.  It was bang on for us and helped us work through a lot of issues that popped up during the first year.

Stuffed frozen kongs and chew toys will also tire her out.  If you have a hallway, you can practice recall and fetch games with her.  Make sure any surfaces she’s running on are soft, and I wouldn’t allow her to jump on or off any furniture as they can easily hurt themselves at this age. 

Do you plan on crate training her?  My husband was initially against it, but when he saw how crazy these dogs can be, he realized it was necessary. 

Oh, and if you’ve never owned one of these pups before, I guarantee that you will ask yourself “wtf have I done?” several times in the first few months of your time together.  Just stick it out, they’re great dogs. 

Sorry to ramble on, obviously having a V has changed my life.  As Marion Coffman put it in Versatile Vizsla: “A Vizsla is truly a dog to be proud of owning, and he is forgiving in case, in a moment of forgetfulness, you call him a doghe is a Vizsla.”

Post # 8
Member
2134 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2015

We lived in a huge apartment complex when we first got our dog, and had the same exact concerns. There were multiple dog parks nearby, as well as grassy areas within the complex for dogs to play and do their business. Obviously, we had to avoid them all for awhile.

Find a random patch of grass somewhere where you don’t see any/many dogs. We were able to find this grassy area out back that was kind of hidden away behind the building, and we never saw any other dogs (or their poop) there. That’s where we took her until she was vaccinated and safe.

Post # 9
Member
3598 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

katy13:  I had the potty pads on the balcony so they didn’t learn to do it inside the apartment.

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