building a natural habitat… help? ideas?

posted 3 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
5207 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: February 2013

@lilFaithy:  You’d have to look deeper into the natural habitat of the species. Gerbils are desert animals, for example. You’d want dust or soft sand as opposed to grass. Hamsters are nocturnal, so they don’t need a lot of light. There’s no one general rodent habitat.

Post # 5
Member
5207 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: February 2013

@lilFaithy:  Oh sure, you can go about that easily. I have reptiles and prefer to keep their habitats naturalistic as well. Let ‘s think though… what can be done with a 10 gallon? It’s not that big so you’re a bit limited.

Post # 6
Member
2593 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

I am not a big rodent person, (I don’t dislike them…except wild mice which creep me out…I just don’t like them enough to keep them as pets), but I have heard from friends who have mice and rats that you are NOT supposed to keep them in aquarium-type habitats.  I am not sure about gerbils and hamsters kept in aqauriums, but I would think this rule would apply as well since the number one reason against it is poor ventilation/air quality.

Post # 8
Member
7075 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

If you’re going for a natural look I’d get an enclosure with a bigger footprint. A tall tank isn’t going to do much for a rodent if he doesn’t have any tubes or whatever to climb.

Post # 10
Member
8419 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: April 2013

@lilFaithy:  My concern for doing a natural habitat for a mammal is cleaning.  We raise geckos and tarantulas and it’s very easy to keep their enclosures clean with the help of tank cleaning isopods; however, this is mainly due to the fact that they only excrete waste a few times a month.  A natural habitat may be difficult to clean, especially if you have a burrowing species.

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