Can anyone breast feed?

posted 3 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 3
Member
545 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@lucyh2bee:  It’s SO individual and there are so many things that go into establishing and maintaining breastfeeding – really, medical research doesn’t even have it all figured out. If you search “breastfeeding success” you’ll quickly see that researchers are looking into ALL kinds of factors.

Personally, I am going to go into it with as much information as possible, get help from a lactation consultant along the way, but if it doesn’t work out, I will be sad, but it will be ok. Basically, I’ll focus on the factors I can control and not worry about what I can’t. 

Post # 4
Member
7259 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 2013

I’m not sure about statistics, but breastfeeding difficulties are very common. My milk came in late, and my daughter was starting to lose too much weight. Luckily, my milk finally came in, but I have to take fenugreek 3 times a day to keep up my milk production. Some people just can’t make enough milk.

Post # 6
Member
307 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

I never got any milk with my first baby. Didn’t have that problem with subsequent pregnancies but not a single drop the 1st time.

Post # 8
Member
307 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

@lucyh2bee:  No. The whole situation was unusual I think. I was 3 weeks past my due date and the delivery ended up being an induction and emergency c-section. Then I had a very high fever for about 3 days and couldn’t see her during which time I shoud have started lactating but didn’t. By the time all the danger passed and I finally got to meet my baby, they had her well established on formula. They said sometimes the stress from the delivery can do that and I certainly didn’t know any better. It was my 1st time and I was so glad it was over, I just went with it.

Post # 9
Member
1802 posts
Buzzing bee

I think it is more common than we think although I don’t know statistics, and I also think a lot of women get ridiculed over their choices. Personally, I think the only way I will be able to breastfeed is if I’m a stay at home mom. I just can’t imagine having to worry about pumping throughout my work day and during the night. I’m a nanny, and the baby that I work with has severe allergies. His mom breastfeeds, and she now cannot eat all of the things that he can’t eat. I just can’t imagine having to completely limit myself in a way that I’m not used to when there’s another option. It works for her, but I know it really wouldn’t work for me.

My mom formula fed my older sister in the late 80’s because she had very low iron and was on WIC for that reason. She also told me that during that time they really didn’t push breastfeeding as much as they do today. I think back then it was more accepted to formula feed, and most hospitals just assumed that was the route you were going to go. She said no nurse tried to help her get the baby to feed right away, and there wasn’t a lactation specialist or anything. Six years later when I was born she was told about all of her options, and she decided to breast feed my younger sister and I. I would say that all of us are the same on the intelligence scale, and my older sister has always been a lot healthier and seems to have a better immune system and my younger sister and I. Those are two major arguments I’ve heard in support of breastfeeding, but I don’t see that they have caused my older sister any problems.

Post # 10
Member
4827 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: June 2013 - Upstate NY

I know SO many women who were unable to breastfeed. I’m not judging; I just don’t understand.

What happened in the olden days if women couldn’t breastfeed (wet nurses were only used a infinitesimlly small percent of women, so don’t suggest that). Did babies just die?? Are our bodies different? 

Post # 11
Member
307 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

@lealorali:  I think only a really really small percentage of women can’t breastfeed. I know many who don’t but I think it’s more of a personal choice thing. Even those that have problems, back in the day I would think there was more of an incentive to resolve the problem than now because we have options available.

That baby where I didn’t get any milk was in the 80s and it wasn’t that big a concern to the hospital staff. They thought it was kinda odd I wanted to breastfeed anyway. It wasn’t “the thing” then. When I had children in the 2000’s breastfeeding was highly encouraged and they frowned upon mothers who were unwilling to try it.

And lastly, yes, our bodies are very different. I dilated 3cm after 36 hours of labor. I would have been one of the ones who died in childbirth I guess (which was not totally uncommon) and feeding the baby probably would have been a moot point.

But even after all that, milk a plenty flowed in for the next 3!

 

Post # 12
Member
7259 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 2013

@lucyh2bee:  I cried A LOT when I was having difficulty. The pediatrician was not pushing formula that much, but he did make me feel really guilty (probably just because I was really sensitive). He suggested formula would be “a good insurance policy”. I have nothing against people who use formula, but I was really judgemental of myself about it. Luckily, my best friend’s mom is a lactation consultant, so I was able to call her and have her help me. She saved my life! I have just this week started giving my daughter formula (twice so far) because I still have a lower supply and not enough to pump for my husband to have on hand. Hopefully once I go back to work, I will be able to pump enough for her and we can quit the formula altogether. I have such bad mom guilt about giving it to her for some reason. I cried the first time I gave it to her.

Post # 13
Member
11772 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: May 2013

My MIL couldn’t with either of her kids, my SIL couldn’t (their milk never came in), my Mom was a low producer with me, and her milk never came in with any of my 3 siblings.

I’m happy I have the internet and an LC to help, but I’m worried that I’ll be like my Mom and unable to BF!

Post # 14
Member
259 posts
Helper bee

My daughter successfully breastfed her first daughter and her son.  Totally failed with middle daughter – the baby lost too much weight and she had to discontinue.  So it can be different with each baby too.

Post # 15
Member
294 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2015

No kids for me- but my mom’s milk never came in. She just couldn’t breast feed at all. 

Post # 16
Member
307 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

@Cory_loves_this_girl:  Awww…don’t cry! You’re doing the very best you can for her either way. I see no differences at all between my formula baby and my breast fed babies. I used Gerber glass bottles (I see they’re making a comeback too) and scrubbed them out and sterilized them in a big pot on the stove every night. LOTS of TLC went into those bottles and she was none the worse for wear (she ended up being a soldier and running around with a giant gun). How’s that for Similac? Worry not!

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