(Closed) Career Advice (And how it sucks to be a woman in the U.S.)

posted 5 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
4046 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

It definitely sounds like you should stay where you are. The amount of flexibility, vacation time, and general comfort at your current job sound like a great fit for someone who may have kids shortly. It really does not sound like the new job offers more than you would be losing by stepping down from your current job.

Regardless of gender, that amount of time and flexibility are unheard of at most workplaces. Most people I know in their 30s might get one or two weeks of vacation time per year, which is scheduled far in advance. Being able to telecommute while pregnant/morning sickness/ general discomfort would be priceless and hard to give up, in my book.

Perhaps you could volunteer for the other organization in your free time?

 

Post # 4
Member
1784 posts
Buzzing bee

Everything in life is a trade off, however it doesn’t make sense to me to step into a new position and have all the benefits of one where you’ve been a good employee for a number of years.  There should be some advantages for seniority. 

I’m sorry you’re faced with making a difficult decision.  You’ll have to decide what makes the most sense to you, but unless I REALLY REALLY hated the current job, I’d have a difficult time giving up 3 weeks of vacation and telecommuting for a 10% pay raise.  

Post # 5
Member
3028 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

I don’t have advice, but can sympathize w/ the FMLA issue.  I consider changing my high stress job all the time, but then think that would push me back 1 yr of TTC.  Plus (and I dont’ know this is always true) changing insurance can be an issue b/c it can be considered a “pre existing” condition.  Other thing is how much birth would cost.  My insurance covers 100% and FI covers 80% which would leave us w/ a pretty hefty bill. 

 

Post # 6
Member
4496 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

I’m a fed and, like you, will be at the top of my pay grade soon (October). I will still get steps increases every year, but we haven’t been getting cost of living increases for 2 years and with the sequestration it doesn’t look like we’ll be getting them anytime soon. I get to telework every other day so I only have to go into the office on Tues/Thurs or M/W/F (alternating weeks). I also work for one of the only federal agencies that offers overtime (I get to do it at home and often its limitless and offered almost all year), plus we aren’t being furloughed. But the only possibilty of a promotion at this agency would be to a supervisory position, which I don’t want.

 

 

 

I am being considered for a job with another fed agency, but I would lose my teleworking benefits and would never have overtime. However, I think the job would be more challenging and I would get a pay increase (10%). Its such a hard decision and I have no idea what I’m going to do if I’m offered the job. I think the extra pay would be great, but honestly with all of the other benefits I’m getting I don’t think that it would be worth the 10% increase (plus it would probably even out in the long run since I do OT already).

 

 

 

If I were you I would probably only switch if you hated the job, which you don’t, or if you felt like you were in danger of being laid off. The only reason I am even considering a change is because I think I might enjoy the work more. I work in investigations right now and the new position would involve the same type of work, but in a different type of department. If vacation time were on the line I would NEVER give it up for a different job.  Also, with you TTC it is probably just not ideal to be starting a new job.

 

 

 

Post # 7
Member
527 posts
Busy bee

@amyj1276:  I work for the CA government, and although you won’t get FMLA, at my work, they still let you take 6 weeks off if you give birth before your year is up.

But say you get the job.  If it takes 4 months to get pregnant, then by the end of your year, you will be 8 months pregnant.  You’ll then be eligible for FMLA benefits.

Post # 8
Member
100 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

I understand your frustrations about your job and career however, regarding the title of your thread, being a woman in the US or western world is the best place to be a woman! Being a woman in Saudi Arabia sucks, very little rights, arent allowed to drive and only recently have they considered woman owning their own ID cards rather than relying on a male relative to vouch for their identity.

Being in a woman in the US is a great thing! You have a variety of choices of careers and work flexibilty…just a little perspective! Laughing

Post # 10
Member
290 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 2013

@MrsCarr85:  +1. If you have a good job with tremendous personal benefits I don’t see how this country owes you anything other than having that opportunity to work and make a living. I would rather live here and go back to work after having a child I choose to have… to my job that I choose to have – than live in a country with a one-child policy or virtually no opportunities to work at all or where women have limited rights, for example. Some countries have extremely generous maternity leave policy’s, good for them but I’d rather live here.

Post # 12
Member
290 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 2013

@amyj1276:  LOL you sure jumped to a lot of conclusions about me which was pretty entertaining. Not from a privledged background at all. Put myself through school and work 70+ hours a week, I’m an adult in the real world, thanks very much. I just feel lucky to be a US citizen where I have the freedom and protection to make decisions for myself and live in the greatest country on earth. If I didn’t want to live here, I’d move. I find that complaining gets me no-where, and expecting to be given anything isn’t a reality for most people on this planet so I’m just thankful for what I have and what I get, that’s how I function.

Post # 13
Member
10591 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2015

@EquiBee2013:  wow, OP never suggested that this country “owed” her anything, and she is right about this country re policy on women and parental time off, support, and much more. Also, this country doesn’t rate very well for best countries to be a woman in. I was reading the stats recently re violence against women and general policy. 

 

Perhaps you didn’t mean to offend, but I found the “owed” comment out of line. She WORKS for a living, and as others have noted, there are many countries with dear better family oriented policies that support parents so they can bind with their children. 

 

ETA after reading your last comment: you are right, this is a country that offers us freedom to be educated about policy facts. I encourage you in that endeavor. Information is free! 🙂

Post # 15
Member
290 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 2013

@Tinatiny1:  You are correct, there was no intent to offend with the word “owed” – I was just replying to the concept or idea that, as a country, we should or could be getting more then we do as citizens (ie the title – “how it sucks to be a woman in the U.S.”). I simply meant to state that I don’t expect anything or feel like I should get anything from the country I live in other than the right to live here. It is indeed different in other countries, but I personally prefer the way the US is set-up as a whole, and do not personally feel that it sucks to be a woman living here. In fact, I am very grateful.

“ETA” – I am not debating policy, nor denying the fact that the US differs from other countries in their policies. But thanks anyway!

Post # 16
Member
10591 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2015

@EquiBee2013:  thanks for clearing that up. I did think you were comparing countries since you said why this was the best place to be, etc, and the stats don’t back that up, nor do the attacks on womens rights to be in charge of their own healthcare. 

 

back to topic: I’d have a hard time passing up a job I was passionate about, but I can see why logically you are better off where you are. You never know what concessions or deals can be made for the right candidate. I would be tempted to go to first interview and if they are interested, present the top two challenges. Maybe since its govt there won’t be flexibility, but it’s worth a shot IMO. 

The topic ‘Career Advice (And how it sucks to be a woman in the U.S.)’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors