Career change to teaching

posted 2 years ago in Career
Post # 2
Member
1102 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

KatJoy227:  interested to hear some responses I could have written this myself….went back to school for accounting 3 years ago, and just started looking at teaching programs. At 29, however I doubt I’ll go back.

Post # 3
Member
1256 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

As a teacher here was my first thought. That is great that youi’re interested in those topics and think middle school social studies would be a good fit. Unfortunately with how most states are going, there doesn’t seem to be as much freedom in teaching. I know in our state following the Common Core is killing teachers passion. Besides that, a ton of your time as a teacher is spent with behavior management, differentiating instruction, dealing with parents, paperwork. I know I was surprised with how little “teaching” I do compared to following predetermined curriculum and other tasks. Is there a teacher you could tag along after to get a good sense? I love teaching but its not all what I expected it to be. Can’t beat the summers off though…

Post # 4
Member
667 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June, 2014

I think if you’re unsure about the decision, you could ask to do some classroom observances or be a para for a year. It gets your feet wet in the classroom without the necessity of getting a teaching degree. Best of luck! Education is a fantastic field. 

  • This reply was modified 2 years, 3 months ago by  ren89.
Post # 5
Member
3084 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

theshannondee:  I’m a teacher too (not a career change though) and I absolutely HATE the Common Core. I teach math and I just feel like the way that it was implemented was horrible. They really should have done it more gradually, like starting with the kids who are 1st grade and then bringing it up. We are supposed to teach kids based on skills that they never learned! So frusterating. /end rant

But I do agree, a lot of your time – especially in the first year – is spent on behavior and classroom management. You can know the subject really well, but that doesn’t equate to a good teacher.

I do really, really love teaching though. I love being around the kids and hopefully making a difference in their lives. I couldn’t imagine having another career.  

Post # 6
Member
1256 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

FoxyBride14:  Oh. My. Gosh. Seriously. We just started introducing the Engage NY curriculum and our kids are in no way ready for it. It should have been done gradually for sure. It’s painful to witness in all honesty.

Post # 7
Member
3084 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

theshannondee:  Yes, it is. I feel bad for the kids, especially the ones who struggle to do well. And what’s even more annoying is that we are getting graded on their scores, when they don’t have the background knowledge. I wish actual teachers were up there making the curriculum, not some bureaucrats who know nothing about teaching. 

Post # 9
Member
4015 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

My DH just switched from working in a law enforcement setting to teaching! He has a bachelors in Biology.

Laid off in February, realized he wanted to teach and started a certificate program at the end of March, finished with observation hours in May and got his new 7th grade Life Science job in July! He really loves it so far even with the whirlwind of new teacher duties, since obviously most everything is very new to him. He has a mentor that is designated to him because he has a probationary certificate until his 1 year (Program requirements). 

i would also recommend getting some hands on hours/observation first so you can see if it’s something you want to switch to! Feel free to PM me if you want more info about the switching over process! It’s been an interesting few months to say the least 

Post # 11
Member
1158 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

KatJoy227:  while I’m not an American bee so I can’t speak to the Common Core (we have the Ontario Curriculum here in my province), I will say that teaching can be a tough yet rewarding profession, and if you have a passion for it, you should definitely go for it.

I know that here in Ontario, it is very hard to get hired with a board, and then even once you do, you have to do a few years of supply teaching/long term positions (e.g. maternity leaves) before you are able to secure something permanent. I loved the years I had the chance to supply teach and have long term positions because it got my feet wet into the teaching profession and it really allowed me to work on my classroom management (especially when supply teaching). That being said, my year of being hired permanently occured just 2 years after being hired with the school board (they have since changed some rules around). I know that many current supply teachers are getting discouraged because it seems like the opportunity will never come. So as I said, you need to definitely have a passion for it, because the issues with hiring (among other issues in the teaching profession, which is no different than issues in any jobs), can be grueling and tiresome at times, so having that drive for it will be needed to outweigh all of the negatives.

 

Also, as PPs have stated, having an in-school mentor teacher will be very helpful (in our board, it is mandatory for all new hires to have a mentor teacher in their first year of the profession, among other helpful things, and I am so grateful that it is the case!). Pick someone who you connect with personally, but also have the same teaching values as you–it will be that much more easier to go to him/her when you need help.

 

Best of luck with whatever you decide to do!! 

Post # 12
Member
414 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2017 - Country Cottage and Gardens

I just finished serving with Americorps for a year, working in a high need school in Orlando. The education system is pretty awful. It’s hard for me to draw broad conclusions about all the schools since I was in a high need school, rated DD (inner city to most people). But from what people say, it’s not much better anywhere else. I think the main issue, at least in my school, is that if you go into teaching you REALLY have to love teaching and love kids. Too many of the teachers are in it because it pays well (they get extra salary for it being a high need need school) and they get summers off. In the end, they were awful to the students and wanted to do nothing beyond the traditional work hours. With my program, I was partnered with a teacher and provided in-class support then pulled students out that were off track so that they would get one on one instruction. My teacher was awful with how she treated the students. One day a student corrected her on how she pronounced her name and the teacher literally said “Don’t correct me. It’s halfway through the year. If I don’t have it right I’m not going to. I don’t care”. It was awful. Expecially after I had fallen in love with my kids and they were coming to me about how awful she was. Obviously I’m not saying you would be like this but this is the education system in a lot of schools. The teachers don’t care to teach. So I think new teachers really need to be willing to go above and beyond and get to know the kids and their parents. If it’s something you really love then awesome. 

 

I personally chose to go into social work and am getting my school social work certificate in grad school. I love working with kids, especially in the “at risk” enviroment and like the versatility of the degree. I can work in the school system or in the non-profit sector. If you end up not liking he bureautic/regulated side of teaching I would definitely recommend that you look into that area. 

Leave a comment


Sent weekly. You may unsubscribe at any time.

Find Amazing Vendors