Cat getting spayed, any advice?

posted 3 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
1802 posts
Buzzing bee

@AquamarineQueen:  We had our first kitten neutered in January, and our second little one has his appointment set for April. We have a kitten plan through our vet’s office which included all of their care including neutering, so we didn’t have to pay for it, but we did get an itemized bill stating what everything cost. If I remember correctly it would have cost $560 without the plan. They don’t even ask if you want to do the IV or the blood test as that is standard procedure, and really should be included in the plan. I don’t really think this is your vet trying to sell you more than is needed. We had to pay out of pocket for the pain pills, but our cat didn’t even seem to need them. He was perfectly fine as soon as he got home.

Is the blood test that the vet is offering to test for feline leukemia? Our kittens were tested for that as anesthesia can kill a kitty if they are positive for that disease. 

Post # 4
Member
176 posts
Blushing bee

@AquamarineQueen:  

My 2 cents…A young healthy cat will probably be fine without pre-op bloodwork. I recommend the IV fluids though. They are important because the gas anesthesia dramatically lowers blood pressure. Low pressure means less blood being delivered to vital organs like the kidneys, liver, etc. Less blood, means less oxygen, which can potentially cause organ damage. Not all vet hospitals are super diligent on monitoring blood pressure during anesthesia, (though most are getting better). Also, when you have IV fluids, it means there is a catheter in your cat’s vein, so if something does go wrong they have instant venous access. Otherwise trying to inject meds into a crashing cat’s collapsed veins might be pretty tough. I am not trying to scare you, by any means, but I think it is worth the bit of extra cash.

Post # 5
Member
2565 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

Many animals will be just fine under anesthesia with the bare minimum, but there are standards of care and monitoring that make everything as safe as possible and reduce risks.  Even though there can be more bleeding during a spay than a neuter, it is still not much.  But the IV and fluids can also help maintain blood pressure that can be affective by anesthesia.

I do think the extras are worth it to make everything as safe as possible, even though the risks are minimal.

Post # 7
Member
1802 posts
Buzzing bee

@AquamarineQueen:  So as long as she’s been checked for leukemia I don’t really see why she would need the blood work. It would be nice to know if something was going on, but would it really change anything in the long run? The blood test we had for ours just checked for the leukemia, and we are assuming that we/our vet would see signs if anything else were wrong. It’s kind of the same for people. I read your update about them putting the IV in if something does go wrong. Idk, I just assume that surgery=IVs, but maybe that is the wrong mindset to have. I always say to hope for the best, but prepare for the worst. I was a nervous wreck waiting for the “he’s okay” phone call all day anyway. I didn’t care what IV was in his arm! LOL

Post # 8
Member
1956 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

I got my cat spayed last week- I had been putting it off because she is less than 5 lbs.  

It was 215 total- including pain meds, blood work, rabies shot, and an all inclusive shot- I can’t remember what all it covered.  They didn’t mention anything about IVs… Unfortunately I could not convince her to take the pain pills (cheese, putting it in her food, those pill pockets- nada)  but she still seems to be doing great.  She was rather upset with me at first though.

I really wanted to get the blood work- it was an extra 75 – because of how small she was if something went wrong and it was because I didn’t get blood work I wouldn’t forgive myself.

Her incision is so tiny- only two stitches.

Post # 9
Member
2073 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

It’s been about 6 years since I had my baby girl spayed… I can’t remember for sure but I think I ended up going with the IV.  I was fresh out of university and had no money (boy that hasn’t changed! back in school this year!)  but I was already very attached to her and the idea of her bleeding out or suffering over something I could’ve changed didn’t sit well with me.

I’m not 100% sure, but I think they ended up needing it for her so it wasn’t money wasted.

Prepare yourself though – I felt so anxious when they actually took her away to do it. Tears welled up and I felt so nervous until they called me when it was over.  They really are our babies!

Post # 10
Member
176 posts
Blushing bee

AquamarineQueen I’m not sure I understand? The point is to have the IV catheter already in place. Once they are anesthetized the blood pressure is lower and it becomes a lot tougher to “hit the vein”, (something that isn’t always easy even on an awake, healthy cat). Not to mention this whole, “put the catheter in scenario” is now happening while your kitty is, um in the middle of abdominal surgery and something is already going wrong 😮

 

I’m sure your cat will be fine, but I would bet ANYTHING your vet isn’t trying to squeeze out a few more bucks from you. They are just trying to offer the accepted standard of care. Back in the day, no one cared about pain management and “extras”, but veterinary medicine is advancing and becoming better. So while these things really should be standard, there is still a lot of resitance because people are not used to paying for them and don’t really understand why they are important. 

 

Post # 11
Member
2593 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

I would do some research online and see if there are any low-cost spay and neuter clinics near you that would give her the spay and the IV for a more affordable cost.  There are a few programs near us that help low income families and rescue groups get their animals fixed at a more reasonable price.  It’s major surgery, so I understand the expense involved, (your vet is NOT trying to “scare you” into paying more), I just wish vets would charge less for spaying and neutering to encourage more people to do so.

Post # 14
Member
2073 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

@AquamarineQueen:  Yeah boys don’t get it.  I honestly didn’t feel nervous or emotional before hand though.  I’d always had cats growing up and nothing bad ever happened to any of them during the process.   But I was a kid and my parents just took care of that.  This little girl was/is my first and only fur baby and she’s equally attached to me.  We have a tight little bond, her and I.  FI actually gets jealous that she doesn’t give him the same kind of attention and snuggles she gives me haha! 

So yeah, I was totally fine until I handed her over and they took her away… then the mommy nerves set in.  But she was fine.  I’m sure they are 99% of the time.  Your little one will be just fine!  But you’ll be nervous anyways lol… good luck!

Post # 16
Member
176 posts
Blushing bee

Oh no, don’t stress!!! She will be fine, it will all be over soon. 

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