CHICKEN POX/HELP

posted 3 years ago in Wellness
Post # 3
Member
2684 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 1996

@Ninteenthchance:  Don’t freak out. Chances are she *has* had the first of the two vaccines. The first one is usually given at the 12 to 15 months. Even if she isn’t immune and she gets chicken pox, the vast majority of kids who get chicken pox don’t experience any serious issues.

Post # 4
Member
8702 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2012

Back when I was a kid, we purposely gave chicken pox to one another to just get it over with.

It isn’t the end of the world if she does get it. 

Post # 6
Member
42460 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

@Ninteenthchance:  This is the information provided by the BC Centre for Disease Control (where I live)

  • The varicella (chickenpox) vaccine is free and recommended for children as part of their routine immunizations. The chickenpox vaccine is given to children as a series of 2 doses. The first dose is given at 12 months of age; a second dose is given at school entry (4 to 6 years of age). The second dose was added to the BC routine immunization schedule in January 2012. All children born in or after 1999 qualify for a second dose of the chickenpox vaccine.
  • It is not necessary for those who had chickenpox or shingles at 1 year of age or older to get the vaccine.
  • Starting in the 2012/2013 school year, the vaccine will also be provided to students in grade 6 who have not received 2 doses of the vaccine. Most students will only need 1 dose of vaccine if they received a dose in the past. However, those who have never received the vaccine should get 2 doses at least 3 months apart. For more information about grade 6 immunizations in BC, read HealthLinkBC File #50F.
  • The vaccine is also recommended and provided free as a series of 2 doses to people born before 1999 who have never had chickenpox disease or received the vaccine. The second dose is given 6 weeks after the first dose. If you are not sure whether you have had chickenpox disease or received the vaccine, you can have a blood test to check for antibodies against the varicella virus.
  • A 2nd dose of vaccine is currently not provided free for people born before 1999 who have received 1 dose of vaccine in the past. Parents of these children may purchase a 2nd dose..
  • This vaccine is 100% effective against severe forms of chickenpox, and up to 90% effective against mild forms of the illness.

If your daughter had her first dose of varicella vaccine at 12 months or so (schedules vary) she is not due for the second booster until age 4-6. You will notice that in the last sentence it says it is 90% effective for mild forms of the illness and 100% effective for severe forms. So, even if she gets chickenpox, she will not get a severe form of the illness.

Post # 7
Member
1168 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

@Ninteenthchance:  the incubation period is 14-16 days, so you really will not know if either of your contracted it for another 2 weeks. It is highly likely that you both were exposed. Try to keep calm and have faith in the vaccines you both recieved. Has your FIL ever recieved a vaccine for it?

 

Post # 8
Member
8702 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2012

As someone who has had both chicken pox and shingles, shingles is the far scarier illness.

Post # 11
Member
42460 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

@Ninteenthchance:  You have to have had chicken pox sometime in your life before you can ever get shingles. Shingles is a flare up of the chicken pox virus which goes dormant on the nerve roots.

There is a vaccine that adults can get for shingles.

Your father in law is the only one who can tell you if he has chicken pox or shingles.

Post # 12
Member
8702 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2012

@Ninteenthchance:  Chances are only people who have had the chicken pox get shingles, since shingles is an advanced strain of chicken pox. Though, it is not unheard of for people to just go for broke and skip the pox and get the shingles. (This is very, very rare.)

If your father in law has never had chicken pox as a child, chances are he has chicken pox now, unless it is a misdiagnosed skin ailment. Lots of skin allergies and rashes can look like chicken pox but really be something completely different. Was your FIL actually diagnosed by a doctor or is he going off of what he thinks?

The difference is that shingles are usually “subdermal.” More severe cases of shingles can produce weeping boils (similar to chicken pox) but shingles are incredibly painful. The itchiness factor is replaced with pure pain. Sometimes they appear with “shingles” (Buildup of skin over the affected area) and sometimes not. My doctor diagnosed me with shingles by poking my painful areas to see if I screamed. No joke.

ETA: Shingles is very serious. I had a minor case of shingles and was put on serious medication to clean it up — I have lost feeling in some parts of the left side of my back, under my left arm and under my left breast. Shingles, even minor cases can leave permenant damage… hence I would be far more worried about shingles in your child’s life than I would be about chicken pox. I got shingles at 18 during my finals — The virus can be stress-aggrivated causing shingles to appear when they really shouldn’t.

Post # 16
Member
2684 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 1996

@Ninteenthchance:  The vaccine is pretty effective. I’d just try not to worry about it.

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