(Closed) Conflict Diamonds

posted 7 years ago in Rings
Post # 3
Member
2006 posts
Buzzing bee

DiamondFacts.org is run by the diamond industry so you have to take what they say with a grain of salt. I have no doubt that they ARE working on making the diamond industry better, but just because they have put laws/regulations in place doesn’t mean they are being followed.

Let’s face it, conflict diamonds are today’s hot topic. Sometimes it is sweat shops, other times it is buying only American made, etc, etc. Americans are very rarely actually worried about the source of the goods they are purchasing, it has more to do with what is “in” at the time. Do your research, follow your own morals/values, and purchase a diamond you are comfortable with wearing 🙂

Post # 4
Member
860 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

I have a diamond, so I don’t pass judgment.  But just thought I’d point out that the website you posted says that it is sponsored by industry organizations- I wouldn’t think this is a source of neutral and reliable info. 

Post # 5
Member
1046 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2010

In addition to human rights issues, there are a lot of environmental issues with diamond (and other gemstone) mining.

Post # 7
Member
14503 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

@Loribeth:There was a show on, I want to say, the History Channel about this.  I am not much of a diamond person, but I would feel completely comfortable buying one.

Post # 9
Member
5148 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

However, I would never buy a diamond from an online source without legitimate brick and mortar stores. It is too easy for online stores to mask their true identities and sell lower quality diamonds with questionable backgrounds. They don’t have a reputation to protect, and they can just start over with a new name and new website if they get caught.

I would have to disagree to an extent. Online stores do have reputations to protect as well, nobody [unless they are stupid] is going to drop thousands at a “new” diamond vendor.

I bought my diamond and setting online (from different online vendors), and I would not have purchased from the companies had they not had such a good reputation on PriceScope for thier quality and service.

And I got a better diamond for less money than brick & mortar stores would have charged. Online venders don’t need to have as many employees, so there’s less overhead added into the price of their products.

Post # 10
Member
610 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

While I agree the industry has made great strides in reducing acquistion from conflict regions, there is a long way to go.  While paperwork may exist authenticating a diamond as “non-conflict”, there is no way to be 100% sure unless you pull the diamond out of the ground yourself.   There are other human and environmental issues that remain from diamond, and gemstone, mining.

 As @sapphirebride: said, any kind of mining can cause major hard to the environment, including increased flash flooding, release of trapped CO2 (greenhouse gas) into the atmosphere and permanent alteration of the landscape.

Child labor is still a serious issue in the mining process and cutting and polishing (in India).

For more information from a journalistic resource, feel free to visit this link…

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/15842546/0

Post # 12
Member
610 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

Wasn’t trying to stir things up.  Just trying to provide alternatives of information.

I chose the article because it is MSNBC, a recognized news organization.  Also, the issues of mining go beyond whether the Kimberly process prevents sales of diamonds to fund arms sales. 

For something more recent, here are some articles about Mugabe and diamond mining in Zimbabwe.  I hope Zimbabwe has Kimberly approval permanently yanked, but there are still buyers from many countries placing bids on the Marange diamonds.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/8520579.stm

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldnews/article-1313123/Robert-Mugabes-darkest-secret-An-800bn-blood-diamond-run-Chinas-Red-Army.html

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/world/7149703.html  (Associated Press)

This is a published evaluation of the Kimberly process after a 3 year review.

http://www.globalwitness.org/pages/en/the_kimberley_process.html

 

The Kimberly Process only refers to the sale of rough diamonds.  This has nothing to do with workers conditions for the cutting and polishing of the diamonds.

 If you want a diamond, go for it.  If your concerned about its origins, do your research, ask questions, ask for verifiable evidence.  There are fair trade companies that sell diamonds, too.

 

Post # 14
Member
610 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

@Loribeth: I think we can both agree that to say that great strides have been made, but more can be done.  There are two sides to every story and both of our sources of information have been evidence to that.

BTW, I never said I had a simulated gemstone.  We did our research when purchasing.   I provided my information so people can compare to make their own decisions.

All the best with your wedding planning.

 

Post # 15
Member
3316 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2009

We elected not to have diamond rings at all.  Yes, I know we could have found conflict-free diamons fairly easily.  However, to my mind, the view that every bride must have a diamond engagement ring is what raises the price of diamonds to the point that conflict diamonds are still profitable.  And I, personally, did not want to contribute to that.

Post # 16
Member
14503 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

Ok, I have a question for you girls.  I am working tonight at a campaign office just volunteering to help a friend out.  I have been following this post and talked about it with the big boss, he kind of snickered at it.  I asked him why that was funny – his response “Those are the same girls buying t-shirts made in sweat shops, electronics made in china – where the environmental standards are the worst, or paper products from India made with contaminated water and poor environmental practices.”  It kind of made me think for a second.  I always check to make sure my car is American and Union made (FH is a Union man), but I never checked where the t-shirts I bought last week from Kohl’s came from.  It kind of embarrassed me.  I should be watching more carefully what little things I buy as well as the big ones. 

Is he right?  I am kind of on the fence about this one.

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