Constant knee cracking (both!) with stationary bike.

posted 3 years ago in Fitness
Post # 3
Member
1249 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

@BellaDee:  it is nothing to be concerned with unless it becomes painful. The cracking noise you hear is actually the sound of carbon dioxide escaping rapidly from the joint.

Post # 4
Member
2913 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2013 - Wynn Las Vegas

My knee cracks A LOT since I started doing crossfit. I have asked about it, and the response has been that if it isn’t painful then it is ok. 

Post # 5
Member
1843 posts
Buzzing bee

As a cyclist I can tell you fitting is super important on the bike. A couple milimeters off and you can start having problems in the knees.  Depending on the frecuency of use it might be wise to try to learn a bit about how to set your stationary properly for your height.  You are not supposed to engage your knee much other than the rotation but not force. You are supposed to be using your glutes, hamstrings and quads to pull and push every pedal.  

 

I would strongly suggest you get your knee checked out if you can. And try to get a better position. Overuse injuries occur not only with a heavy routine but with shorter ones where parts of your body that were not design to carry such forces or loads end up doing the work the big muscles should be doing.  Pedaling should never feel uncomfortable in your knees. That is a sign of either injury or bad position/fitting on the bike that could really lead to injury. I’ve known people who ended up needing surgery after spinning classes gone wrong due to poor position in an already weak knee and another cyclist who decided he was not spending $150 on a bike fit for a $5,000 bike because “he knew what he was doing” and ended up needing surgery that cost him more than $10,000 :-/

 

Since you probably just want to get a good workout and stay in shape, you don’t need to invest in a pro fitting. With some basic knowledge you can do it for yourself.  

 

I found these two sources that have pretty decent info. Good luck and please make sure you are not injuring yourself. 

 

http://healthyliving.azcentral.com/proper-seat-position-riding-exercise-bike-1153.html

 

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=G43ExfqGB9o

 

Post # 6
Member
1849 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2013 - backyard in the woods

I have this issue with my left knee on bikes. every pedal my knee ‘pops’.  I was double-bounced ona trampoline as a kid and got my knee caught in the springs where it bent the wrong way. It’s been like that since it healed. However, mine will actually lock up my knee every few pumps of the pedal. Not painful, just some pressure, but I have to remove my leg from the pedal in order to straighten it/unlock it every time it happens.  I’m worried I’ll injure it when it locks up, so I don’t use bikes- at the gym or otherwise. I have no issue with ellipticals but I have to limit my time on a treadmill or my knee gets sore.

Post # 7
Member
3268 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2015

@BellaDee:  I have the same issue with one knee, as I ride a recumbent exercise bike for about half of my cardio exercise in the winter (especially in crappy winters like this one where there isn’t enough snow for me to go cross-country skiing). I agree with PP who said to work on fitting the bike to you better. I ride a road bike a lot in the warmer months and it is very important to make sure the seat is at the correct height/distance from the pedals so you never overextend your legs– your knees shouldn’t be quite straightened all the way even when your legs are fully extended while pedaling.

I unfortunately can’t adjust my FI’s exercise bike for my legs correctly– the seat doesn’t go far enough forward for my legs to avoid hyperextension. So I ride it wearing clogs with 1 1/2″ thick soles, which helps. If you’re short, you might be having the same issue– if you can’t get the seat low enough or far forward enough, wear thick-soled shoes and see if that helps.

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