(Closed) Correcting a childs speech

posted 5 years ago in Parenting
Post # 3
Member
9920 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

When I talk to my nieces and nephew, I just repeat back to them the correct way of saying it.  For my four year old nephew, sometimes we work on saying things like la-la-la or snack, because he has trouble with L an S-blends.  

For example, he’ll say, “I want a nack!” and I’ll say, “Oh, you want a snack?  What would you like for your snack?” or whatever.

 

What do you do?

Post # 4
Member
13102 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

No stories from my own kids (don’t have any yet) but have an entertaining story about me/my mom.

My mom was a speech pathologist in an elementary school until she had me and decided to be a SAHM.

When I went to kindergarten, the speech pathologist in my school kept sending home info about sending me to sessions with him to correct my speech.  My mom kept asking him to stop but after multiple more times informed the man that she was also a speech pathologist and, as I did not have the proper teeth in place yet for making the corrections he was suggesting, she would not be sending me to his sessions and would correct me at home if needed when the appropriate time came.

ETA: The letters home stopped after that!  🙂

Post # 5
Member
5481 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

@peachacid:  I do that too.  My niece is 5 now, but sometimes gets verb tenses mixed up.  She’ll say “we goed to the store” and I’ll say something like “Oh, you went to the store?  What did you get?”

Post # 7
Member
6010 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

We pretty much use the method @peachacid:  described.  We just repeat the word/phrase with the correct pronunciation.  If it’s a particularly difficult word (many toddlers have trouble pronouncing “spaghetti,” for exampe) we’ll say the word syllable by syllable every so often to emphasize the pronunciation.

Post # 8
Member
1040 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2010

I’m a speech therapist, and working with kids is my favourite. Some of the pronounciations they come up with are hilarious.

As far as correcting speech, I like @peachacid’s idea. However, the child you’re talking about is VERY young to be concerned about his speech. Typically, s-blends and some of the more difficult sounds (r, s, j, etc) aren’t fully developed until age 4 or 5, sometime even as late as age 7. This little boy is probably still figuring out where in his mouth certain sounds are made, and he will grow into it soon. 

If he is not aware that he is making mistakes (which, at 2.5, I don’t think he is), I wouldn’t worry about trying to correct him. He won’t understand the difference between what he is saying and what you are saying. But if you keep modelling the correct word, he’ll mimic you and catch on eventually.

Hope this helps!

Post # 9
Member
869 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

@moose91:  I’m a speech therapist and at 3 years old you don’t need to be too worried about /s/ blends just yet. I would just say the word correctly for him and move on. Thats great that he’s so verbal at 3!

Post # 12
Member
9920 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

@Ballet513:  That’s like parents who contact me to tutor their three and four year olds…panicking because they’re not reading yet.  Um…yeah they’re THREE!

Post # 13
Member
413 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

I’m an elementary teacher- a lot of blend sounds aren’t developed until 1st-2nd grade.  Boys develop language and correct pronunciation later than girls.  I wouldn’t worry about it and if you are constantly correcting- the child might become frustrated.

 

Post # 14
Member
416 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

No expierience here but I have a story. My younger brother had problems prounouncing TR sounds. He usually replaced them with F sounds.Trying would become frying or “give the puppy treat” would become “give the puppy feet”. Anyway we were walking to the park once and he say a big truck, it excited him so much that infront of a bunch of parents and children he pointed and screamed “Look at that huge f***”. Needless to say I was mortified and refused to take hime to the park for a while after that. My mom actually laughed when I told her.

Post # 15
Member
774 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@monique1218:  True! My little cousin is 3, and is very talkative! Some works she’ll get mixed up or mispronounce. She has trouble with some sounds or she’ll say my name “aaaaashley”. My older sisters teacher side comes out and she always corrects her! Every little thing, and she’ll just stop talking because she gets frusterated.

I think its something that kids learn with time, and my best friend had a speech issue growing up, she said its something that works itself out. But also talking baby talk to kids doesnt help either, because most of the words they learn are by listening to mom and dad.

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