Decline job before it's offered?

posted 3 years ago in Career
  • poll: Should he call and decline the job now?
    Call and let them know he isn't interested now : (13 votes)
    17 %
    Wait until they contact him : (62 votes)
    83 %
  • Post # 2
    Member
    1478 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: July 2016

    I’d write a grateful, but somewhat lukewarm thank you note/email. The less-than-enthusiastic note might tip them off. Other than that, I’d just do nothing.

    Post # 3
    Member
    1634 posts
    Bumble bee

    I would wait until they contact him. There’s always a chance that a prospective employee will turn down them job, thats why its called an offer! I’d suggest waiting, since he might be interested in working there in the future.

     

    Post # 4
    Member
    116 posts
    Blushing bee

    I think it would be better for him to call them asap and thank them for the opportunity to work with them, but he would like to respectfully withdraw his application for the job. If his application is in fact successful, the business will have wasted time making their choice and will waste yet more to select another applicant. 

    Post # 5
    Member
    2873 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: May 2014

    This is a hard one.  My intial reaction is that it is presumptuous to tell them that he doesn’t want the job when the offer hasn’t been made.  And I am pretty sure I stick by that.  It is not am impression I would want to make to a hiring manager. 

    I think he should be prompt with his reply that he doesn’t want the job though, if the offer is made.  It really burns bridges to let the company on the hook to try to find a second candidate with a start date looming. 

    Post # 6
    Member
    1662 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: October 2013

    JenGirl:  I’d do nothing until they contact him. No need to bother them for now.

    Post # 7
    Member
    830 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: January 2013

    I have been in a similar situation. In my situation (as pompous as it sounds), I knew that they were dying to have me, but I had not received a formal offer yet. It was a large company and required lots of rigamarole to hire. The interview left me with the strong impression that I would not fit in with the corporate culture. I called the person who interviewed me and thanked him for the meeting, but that I wanted to let him know that I had made the decision to take a different path. I dont feel I burned a bridge, however I have heard since that they were upset (not that I took my name out of the running), that I didnt wait to hear a salary offer before declining.

    Didnt matter to me what the salary was, a bad fit is bad news.

    Good luck!

    Post # 8
    Member
    2084 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: May 2014

     

    JenGirl:  No he should certainly not contact them to decline a job before it is even offered…there’s not really any other way to look at that except cocky. Wait and see IF it is offered..and if it is then he can politely decline as he would any other job. He can also add at that time that while this particular job may not be the best fit, he would certainly like to be considered in the future. That is not burning bridges nor is it being cocky.

    Post # 9
    Member
    2084 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: May 2014

     

    blauren:  That’s how the hiring process works. And the people doing the hiring know that. You’re not putting HR people out by having them simply do their jobs.

    Post # 11
    Member
    1894 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: May 2013

    I think it depends — if its a high level job where there are only a few well qualified candidates (and maybe they are only interviewing one person at a time) I would call/ write and say something (like while I appreciate the opportunity to interview I don’t see this position fitting in with my goals but if something that was more …. opened up please let me know)

     

    if this is just a general interview for an entry level type position where they are interviewing dozens of people then I would just say nothing and wait to see if they call

    Post # 12
    Member
    830 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: January 2013

    littlemisshostess:  agreed. Or if they were creating a position FOR him. Allowing them to continue in that case wouldnt feel right.

    Post # 13
    Member
    3637 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: September 2015

    I think the wording of it is VERY important as blauren:  said, he wants to withdraw this application. Rather than “declining the offer” before it’s even been made, if he says that he would like to withdraw this application it simply implies that his circumstances have changed and he on longer wishes to change jobs. It also says “hey, please don’t waste your time looking at my application anymore”.

     

    I think that it is perfectly fine to withdraw an application because, whether or not you thought you would get the job, they still have to look over everyone’s application again following the interview. So, successful or not, he would be saving them time and effort. I think they would appreciate this and it would show that he understands how time consuming and costly the hiring process is and that he is considerate of their time and money. That can’t be anything but good for future relations. 

    Post # 15
    Member
    1248 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: April 2014

    I’ve withdrawn from a job application process before. I just politely emailed after the interview thanking them for their time but that I no longer wished to be considered for the position. As someone who has been on the other side of the hiring process several times I would much rather an applicant do that than waste my time checking their references, writing up letters of offer, getting ok from management etc.

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