Dental Bridge vs Implants?

posted 3 years ago in Wellness
Post # 3
Member
5445 posts
Bee Keeper

I don’t have either but would definitely opt for a bridge myself. Putting metal in your mouth can cause health problems. 

Post # 5
Member
5445 posts
Bee Keeper

@babylo0n:  yeah I would definitely opt for the bridge. If done well there shouldn’t be any problems with it and it should look good!

Post # 6
Member
1629 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

@babylo0n: Bridges which use your existing teeth as anchors have a pretty high failure rate. Often, the anchor teeth will eventually need to be extracted and your bridge will have to use the next adjacent teeth as anchors. This results in a domino effect which can be pretty devastating. I am in a similar situation and I’m going with implants. Implants are made out of titanium which integrate into your bone to the point where eventually your bone and the titanium cannot be separated from each other. This makes implants extremely strong and long lasting. Implants have a very low failure rate and do not affect existing teeth negatively like teeth supported bridges will. I’ve done a ton of research on this and I would never go with a tooth supported bridge as long as I could afford the implant surgery. I’m having the implant surgery next month so pm me if you’d like me to follow up with you after I have that done! 

 

Post # 7
Member
989 posts
Busy bee

@babylo0n:  I would go with the bridge. Both bridge and implant can fail – but there’s a lot of procedures and healing (and expense!) involved with implants – especially if the tooth has been missing for a while – there may be bone loss and you may need a bone graft to support the implant, and even after that, there is no guarantee it will last (there’s really no guarantees with dentistry). The bridge is a good option – less trauma, less expense, great aesthetics. Talk it over with your dentist anyway, and see what they think.

Post # 8
Member
163 posts
Blushing bee

@peasantsong:  This is the same conclusion I’ve come across from my research. I would always have the implant, as long as I was a good candidate and could afford it.

@babylo0n:  As I said to peasantsong, I would always have the implant, as long as I was a good candidate and could afford it. There is a reason people do implants even though they are more expensive and seem to be more invasive (with it being screwed into your bone).

From my understanding, implants have a high success rate, don’t affect the surrounding teeth, and are less likely to cause issues over time (making them possibly cheaper than if you had a bridge in and needed to get additional work done as a result).

I think the main reason people get bridges is because of cost (unless the person isn’t a candidate for implants), but honestly if you need more dental work done then that is more cost over time. Here’s a Personal Health NYTimes article on one person’s experience with bridges/implants if you want to read it. I’m sure you can do more research online if you’re interested.

As for your fears due to your relative’s experience. Was your relative a good candidate for an implant? How is his health? Does he smoke? Those factors contribute to whether someone is a suitable candidate for an implant. Did the dentist who put it in have a great deal of experience with implants? Usually implants are very successful, but anything can fail.

Btw, my mother actually has had an implant for the past 10 years with no issues and she is very pleased with it. You can look around and find specific cases of success and failure for any one thing in particular. That’s just how life works.

Of course, you should talk about all of these options with your dentist and figure out what he/she recommends for your particular case and then come up with a plan together with your dentist. We can’t tell you whether you’re a good candidate one way or the other, and I don’t know how much sense it makes for you to make your decision based on what we’d choose to do. What’s right for one person may not be right for someone else.

Post # 9
Member
1629 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

@MsKiss:  the other major benefit of an implant over tooth supported bridge is that the implant will preserve your existing bone. Without the implant, your bone will go away, which is the reason for the high failure rate of tooth supported bridges. The bone around the teeth supporting your bridge will go away making those teeth incapable of supporting the bridge. Most dental professionals say the life of a tooth supported bridge is 5-10 years. The life of an implant or implant supported bridge is 20+ years with an average of 98% succes.  Implants are by far the preferred treatment for replacing lost teeth. 

Post # 10
Member
42469 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

I have 3 implants to replace adult teeth which never developed. I have had no problems with them.

They definitely require a commitement to good dental hygeine.. If you are not the type of person to brush and floss regularly, you are more likely to get infection which can be difficult to cure if it gets into the bone. If you brush and floss regularly, you should have no problems.

My dentist recommends them over bridges for patients who can be trusted to take care of their teeth. Why grind down two perfectly healthy teeth to support a bridge?

Post # 11
Member
819 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2009

I got a dental implant in February of this year because I had one adult tooth that never came in. Expensive, but totally worth it IMO. Thanksfully DH has a flex spending account through work so I got reimbursed 100%. I haven’t had any issues with it so far.

Post # 12
Member
369 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

I have both, my current bridge is for my front 6 teeth and is 18 years old and going strong. I have an implant for 2 bottom teeth and I would never do another implant again. In fact, I had a root canal crumble (because I didnt crown it, I was a starving student) and am putting a bridge in over an implant to fix the “space”. My implants are heat and cold sensitive, ocassionally hurt for no valid reasin and were difficult to heal.

Post # 13
Member
181 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

I have an implant and have not had any issues with it. i have had it for 8 years now

Post # 14
Member
163 posts
Blushing bee

@peasantsong:  Yup, the bone disintegrates if there is no tooth structure there (or screw in the case of an implant), which is why people have to do bone grafting if the tooth has been missing for a while and the bone has already begun to disintegrate.

Post # 15
biscuitMember
627 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2011 - Catholic Church, Lakeview Golf Resort and Spa

Dentist here–If you already have teeth prepped for a bridge, get the bridge as it it makes more economic sense and the teeth around it have already been made smaller. If not, an implant is a good way to go because it doesn’t compromise any other teeth. My general rule is–if any tooth next to the empty space needs a crown, then I suggest a bridge. If not, I suggest an implant. Age and lifestyle play a part too. I probably wouldn’t advocate getting an implant in a 98 year old patient nor on a heavy smoker with diabetes, etc.

I am a little confused about what is going on with your particular case, but I would suggest that if you trust your dentist (and you should if you’re seeing him/her 🙂 ), just ask him for more explanation. I have patients call me all of the time with questions.

Post # 16
Member
110 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

I’d certainly recommend you defer to a dentist’s advice on this, but I had an implant done almost 15 years ago for a tooth that never developed, and I have never had a problem. I would personally worry more about a bridge needing to be replaced in the future than an implant, but, certainly not my area of expertise, only personal experience.

Leave a comment


Sent weekly. You may unsubscribe at any time.

Find Amazing Vendors