Dental xrays

posted 2 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 2
203 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2015

Worriermum:  I was worried I might be pregnant a couple months ago, right before I got dental xrays and work done. But I researched it and it should be A-Ok! 

Post # 3
8678 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2012

The amount of radiation you take in from a couple dental x-rays isn’t much more than you take in from a couple days worth of daily exposure to radiation from soil, your granite countertops, vehicles.<br /><br />Rapidly dividing cells will be fine. It’s more important for mom to have excellent oral health.

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Post # 5
312 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2017

Hyperventilate:  Worriermum:  I am a dentist, and totally agree with the previous poster. Try not to worry as much, there are a lot of securities built into the x-ray taking process to minimize exposure to the head and neck area, which would also minimize scatter radiation throughout the body. One really does get more radiation from being outside, in planes, etc. If you were aware that you were pregnant, it would have been a nice option for you to have. But I’m sure this happens very often and most children turn out just fine. Congratulations on your pregnancy!

Post # 6
3119 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

Although I didn’t get x-rays since I got pregnant, I have had a lot of dental work and so checked with my doctor about x-rays just in case. She said they were okay as long as the dentist used the cover on my chest. I’d avoid it if possible (like I avoid the x-ray scanner at the airport) but I really wouldn’t worry about it since it already happened! 

Post # 7
403 posts
Helper bee

Worriermum:  Nothing to worry about at all, I can assure you as a medical radiation science student (we work with both x-rays and many other scans etc) that your baby will be fine! X-rays have an very low dosage and a dental x-ray would not be emitting radiation anywhere near your stomach, so don’t lose any sleep over this. 🙂

Post # 10
1238 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

Worriermum: One set of dental X-rays is not going to cause cancer. And there’s no need for name calling when people are just trying to help you and offer advice.

Post # 12
2174 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: November 2012

Did you seriously call another user a “retard” for a comment meant to ease your fears? If you think that is at all appropriate, perhaps you should find another place to find advice when asking about such issues. Dental X-rays caused no harm to your child, and neither did bending her too forward when burping.

Post # 13
203 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2015

This escalated quickly..


Post # 14
1436 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

[comment moderated for name calling]

Post # 15
7664 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

X-rays will not give you cancer unless you have lots of them. From the NHS website:

“People are often concerned about being exposed to radiation during an X-ray. However, everyone is exposed to sources of natural radiation throughout their life.

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Natural radiation is sometimes known as background radiation. Sources of background radiation include:

  • radon – a naturally occurring radioactive gas found in low levels in the atmosphere 
  • cosmic rays – a type of radiation that originates from space (from the sun and stars)
  • the earth – soil and rocks contain various radioactive materials that have been present since the earth was formed; these contribute to our exposure, as do building materials made from soil, rocks and stones
  • food and water – for example, nuts, bananas, red meat and potatoes all contain tiny traces of radiation

…. Being exposed to X-rays carries a theoretical risk of triggering cancer at a later date, as does exposure to background radiation.

However, this risk is very low. For example, the Health Protection Agency (HPA) has calculated that:

  • an X-ray of your chest, teeth, arms or feet is the equivalent of a few days’ worth of background radiation, and has a less than 1 in 1,000,000 chance of causing cancer
  • an X-ray of your skull or neck is the equivalent of a few weeks’ worth of background radiation, and has a 1 in 100,000-1,000,000 chance of causing cancer
  • an X-ray of your breasts (mammogram), hip, spine, abdomen or pelvis is the equivalent of a few months’ to a year’s worth of background radiation, and has a 1 in 10,000-100,000 chance of causing cancer
  • an X-ray that uses a contrast fluid, such as a barium meal, is the equivalent of a few years’ worth of background radiation, and has a 1 in 1,000-10,000 chance of causing cancer

It’s important to put the risk of developing cancer from X-rays into perspective. More than one in three people in the UK will develop some form of cancer during their lifetime.

…. The doses of radiation used during an X-ray aren’t thought to pose a risk to an unborn baby. However, as a precaution, X-rays that directly target the womb (abdominal X-rays) aren’t usually recommended unless there’s a clear clinical need.

In some cases, an alternative method that doesn’t involve radiation, such as an ultrasound scan, may be recommended.

Before having an X-ray, you may be asked about the date of your last period. This is to check whether there’s a chance that you could be pregnant.

Don’t panic if you have an X-ray and later discover that you’re pregnant. Even the most powerful types of X-rays, such as a barium enema, aren’t thought to have any adverse effects on the outcome of a pregnancy.”



You can find all of the information you need on Google.

Also, I think refraining from name calling would be a good idea in the future.

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