Differences between American and British weddings

posted 2 years ago in Traditions
Post # 2
Member
67 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: January 2015 - Banquet Hall

What are the differences? Lol

Post # 3
Member
2052 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

For a UK wedding, there isn’t usually a shower, rehearsal dinner, garter toss or “parent- child” dances. I’m assuming this is what the OP means. 

In addition, I’ve noticed UK weddings usually last several hours longer than US weddings and it is totally normal and accepted (indeed, often expected) to have additional evening guests who arrive after dinner in time for the evening festivities. 

Post # 4
mswallabyBee
2070 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: November 2012 - Oak Tree Manor

I’ve read that British weddings can’t take place outdoors – that is so odd to me!

Overall though, I loooove looking at photos from British weddings, with the fancy vintage cars, women wearing hats, etc. (I’m sure not all British weddings are like that, but still… so pretty!)

Post # 5
Member
2052 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

Mrs. Wallaby:  I’m not 100% sure, but I think they’ve just changed the law so that now you can! And there used to be a time restriction too but now you can marry at any time of day. 

Another difference I’ve thought of is that I’ve seen a lot of US bees have multiple pieces of music for people to process in to. In the UK the bride tends to walk in first (although that tradition is changing) followed by the bridesmaids, to one piece of music. 

Post # 8
Member
1470 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2016 - Gorse Hill, Surrey, UK

And cash bars. That’s so normal here to include drink during the meal and arrival drinks, but seems to be a massive deal in the US if you don’t pay for all your guests drinks throughout the entire day and evening. I couldn’t imagine picking up a bar tab that big at the end of the night!

Post # 9
Member
1470 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2016 - Gorse Hill, Surrey, UK

Lovemyboy:  we’ve been to a venue that holds outdoor ceremonies and it’s on our short list. There have only been about two or three in every twenty to thirty places that have a license for outdoor weddings that I’ve found 

Post # 10
Member
1470 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2016 - Gorse Hill, Surrey, UK

Audrey2:  I don’t really understand what the rehearsal dinner and bridal shower are for, but the bachelorette is like a hen party?

Post # 11
Member
3735 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

An all day wedding would be exhausting to me. I do like the idea of the evening guests coming but to do a wedding that last allllll day would be long. I guess it is all what you are used to…

Post # 12
Member
209 posts
Helper bee

Im a UK Lady 🙂

Most weddings I’ve attended go as follows.

Groom arrives, it’s become fashionable for Groom to arrive by exocti sports car or even helicopter (not to my taste).<br /><br />Bride arrives agai by fancy car or horse and carridge. Sometimes with bagpipes playing if in the Northeren part of England.<br /><br />Ceramony usualy a Church/Stunning Garden Grounds/Luxury Hotel/ Lavish Manor House. We have the traditional “Kiss the Bride” / “I Do’s”‘ / Father walking daughter down isle / Bridesmaids / Groomsmen/ Maid of Honor/ Ring barer / Flower Girls. <br /><br />One thing I havnt heard from our Amercian buddies is I don’t know if they have Ushers. We ofen have ushers, they are male part of the grooms party who seat everyone (Sorry if I’m mistaken). 

 

After the ceremony we make our way to the dinner, sometimes this can be a seperate venue. We place the gifts on the gift table, and either get seated by ushers or theres seating chart and we find our places. Waiters are usualy constantly filling our wine glasses. 

Head table usually sits, Bride/groom/parents/MOH/BM. Sometimes a lot more I’ve seen the entire wedding party seated on a giant U shape table before.

Speached are given usually by father of bride/groom/best man and it’s now fashionable for MOH and Bride to give a small toast aslo. 

After dinner guests usually make their way to the evening do, which is usualy hosted by a DJ or live band. Bride and groom have first dance, and other guests arrive that werent invited to evening do. A buffy/ large food spread is often out for the guests and you have the Garter toss. A Bee mentioned this doesnt happen in UK but every wedding I’ve been to has consisted of this, maybe it depends on the area of UK. 

Next day Bride/groom and weddin party usually have a breakfast and Bride/Groom usually open presents. Although sometimes Bride/Groom leave for honeymoon during evening do or after breakfast. 

We have a Hen Do and Stag Do, same as Bachelor ect<br />No rehersal dinner or shower and I think the bouquet toss is an outdated thing in UK.<br /><br /><br />

Post # 14
Member
10493 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

I think there tends to be differences in every country.  Culture makes a big difference too.

Post # 15
Member
3828 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

Splodge2003:  yes the bachelorette is a hen party. 

The bridal shower is basically all the women getting together again and give the bride gifts and advice for her marriage. <br /><br />

The rehearsal dinner is just a nice dinner after the wedding rehearsal with the imediate family and wedding party.

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