(Closed) Do I want a dog?

posted 5 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
5786 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2011

Based solely on this post I don’t think it’s a good idea. It doesn’t sound like you want the unpleasant parts of pet ownership and it can be very unpleasant/gross/frustrating at times. Maybe you can dogsit for a friend for a few days and see if you’re really up for it?

Post # 4
Member
687 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2016

@coffeegal85:  Be prepared that once you get your doggy, you will need to care, feed and give that doggy unconditional love and help for the rest of his life. Your home will be that doggy’s forever home, and it will cost money, time and patience. You will need to train, discipline and put alot of effort in being a dog owner.  Do you have the finances, time and patience, love and commitment, I’ld say that you should go for it. Having a dog is one of the greatest things ever but only if you are prepared for it.

 

Post # 5
Member
1432 posts
Bumble bee

Well for starters do you want a puppy or adopt an adult dog?  That is like night and day when you bring the dog home. Puppies are a lot of work in the beginning! My husband and I got a pupy a few months ago. He is shredding paper as I type haha. He gets easier and easier as time goes by but they are a lot of work in the beginning where an adult dog would be. The main thing to reallllly think about is how your life will change with a dog and if thats what you want. We were pretty spontaneous people before our puppy. Always wanting to go out of town, travel ect and having a dog is pretty limiting unless you have someone who will dog sit.  Unfortunately we dont really have many dog sitter friends or families so for us there is an extra cost for boarding him when we do want to travel.  Cost wise.. our only ones were his initial vaccines and praying he wont have any health issues in the future.  Because you husband works at home makes it way easier because he won’t get lonely.  All in all I feel like getting a dog is a lot of responsability but we love our puppy and can’t really imagine life without him now. It made us feel more like a “family unit” 🙂  

Post # 6
Member
13101 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

For me, the pros of owning a dog BY FAR outweigh the cons.  But you seem to be hung up on the cons so maybe now isn’t the right time for you to get a pet.

I agree with the PPs suggestion of pet-sitting full-time for a friend or family member’s dog for a few days so you can get a better feel for what it entails.

Post # 7
Member
646 posts
Busy bee

If you have to ask the question, then you dont want one. Its a HUGE responsibility, and if you even think you might not be ready, then I highly suggest that you dont get a pet.

Post # 9
Member
3830 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

The dog will tie you down alot. My FI and i are fairly social and have events we go to often on weekends. Well what do we do with the dog then? We need to pawn him off on our parents usually. Which sucks.  And remember they need to be walked (especially a golden retreiver like the one you posted) twice a day usually for 1-1.5 hours total. So you BOTH need to take the time to walk them.

Having a dog, having a well behaved and well cared for dog, can be alot of work. So be aware of that. 

Post # 11
Member
752 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

Owning a dog is easy, however training and discipline is not. As someone who hasn’t ever owned a pet, you may want to consider adopting a young dog from a rescue. Usually they stay at foster homes and are pretty well trained. 

I’ve raised a puppy and adopting two young dogs. The only reason I could have a puppy is because someone was always home with it, you have ot develop a schedule at first to teach it to go outside. It takes time, patience, and a carpet/floors you don’t care about. Since your SO stays home, it could work. But it may get frustrating if the dog wants to be playful or go out when he needs to get work done/be on a call. 

Adopting a young dog is beneficial because you still get the youthfullness without the headache of training. That is not to say that all dogs that are adopted are trained, or well tempered, but you can find one that is. The foster home iwll know everything about the dog and you can make an informed decision.

And as others have said it is a huge time committment. Invited for drinks after work? Who will let the dog out? Spur of the moment long get away weekend? Who will watch the dog? Hitting the town on a Saturday night? Don’t stay out too late, the dog needs to be let out. I don’t consider these negatives, it’s just part of pet ownership and something to strongly consider before taking on a pet. 

Post # 13
Member
8152 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

Not to be all preachy, but if you’re going to get a dog, please please please research the different breeds quite a bit and don’t buy a “designer” dog. They are not all non-shedding and hypoallergenic, despite what their breeders lead you to believe. Most are bred purely for profit. If you want a pure bred look for a breeder that is doing health testing (hips, eyes, elbows, etc), and working with their dogs (showing, herding, whatever). And if you want a mix there are plenty of them in shelters looking for homes, even puppies.

And yes as others have said they are HUGE time commitment, especially as puppies. I’ve heard people say raising a puppy was more stressful than a human baby.

Post # 14
Member
3830 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@coffeegal85:  Yes he is worth it. Hes such a suck and he loves us to pieces. Granted it took ALOT of work to get him where he is now. And he still has alot to learn.  If i were to do it all over again, personally i would adopt a 1 or 2 year old dog because they should have basic training as well as being potty trained. Its hard for us to leave our dog home alone for any amount of time. Once he is older and trained better it will get easier. Puppyhood was miserable for us because we have such a high engergy dog. It took awhile for him to calm down and for him to mature. 

I also has EVERYTHING to do with breed. We have a lab and they are high energy and mouthy. And our dog is a total attention seeker. These issues dont necessarily effect other breeds. 

Post # 15
Member
5969 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2018

Ask not what your dog can do for you, but what you can do for your dog…there’s dog people and then there’s not…you gotta KNOW what you are before you do anything.  I’m of the mind that the love and loyalty a dog gives it’s owners is something they never really earn, but you gotta spend your life trying your damndest to!!  Dogs are marvelous, wonderful, amazing companions, and Mr. 99 and I love our three boys sooo much!  That being said, they are not without their tolls, housebreaking is a new adventure with every dog, because they all learn differenly, and they all make mistakes, vet bills, toys, dog beds, food!  All cost money!  Grooming, bathing, training, walking, playing…all take time and effort on a daily basis and remember, they don’t last forever…there’s an agreement between a dog and it’s person, I know if I was dying somewhere, wild horses couldn’t drag my boys away from me, and when the time comes I’ll see my boys to the clearing…that’s a big tab to pay, but you do it because that’s part of the deal…

Think about those things, and if your still on board, make it happen..if not, maybe a cat?

 

Post # 16
Member
4479 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 2012

Has your FI had a dog before?  Since he’ll be spending the most time with it, I’d take that into account.

The topic ‘Do I want a dog?’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors