do you live & work abroad?

posted 3 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
1043 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

Im a student in Ireland… Luckily I have a brittish and a canadian passport so i didnt need any visas. coming here alone, and not knowing a single person in the entire country was the scariest part, but it forced me to make new friends and get involved with new organizations.

 

my program moves me around the country every few months for placements, and they dont help with accomodations; so trying to arrange new apartments if im back in Canada for the holidays or summer, and figuring out where to store my car and all my stuff is probably the hardest bit. One day itll be a life experience i will look back on and be happy about… One day…

Post # 4
Member
138 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

My SO works abroad so I followed him to China. He works in IT, I work sometimes but I can only work for specific companies because of the visa I am on. A lot has been challenging, the language barrier, the food, the smells, the people, the spitting, the kids peeing and pooping on the sidewalks! I could go on but each day is an adventure and we only have about a year and a half left and I am starting to dread leaving!

Post # 5
Member
221 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

@dv3849:  

That sounds really challenging! I’m also in Ireland, but living here the last 16 years, so it’s not exactly a temporary situation… I’m French and have married an Irish. It’s actually been easy for me, but I’ve lived and worked in a few different countries before I moved here. Where abouts are you currently? Just curious, I’m not the stalky type!!Wink

Post # 6
Member
2302 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2015

my fiancé and I are law students living in England – we LOVE it. i haven’t found any of it challenging really, we’ve always travelled a lot and lived in different cities so homesickness is a total non issue. 

we’re graduating and going home in july and i will be SO SAD. even now when i go on walks, my brain automatically goes to ‘i will miss x, y and z’ when we leave. these two years will be this massively sentimental time to look back on in our lives – it’s been amazing.

Post # 7
Member
4698 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

My husband and I teach English in Korea. It is blast but the paperwork is definitely a pain the butt. Its a pretty cushy job and its because of that that right now we are on honeymoon in thailand!

Post # 8
Member
1043 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

@sweetaure:  haha no worries, i just moved to clonmel, i was in west clare before christmas and have also lived in a few places in Limerick… So far limerick has been my favourite… Im a city girl, this rural stuff is driving me crazy!

Post # 9
Member
2828 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

Yes. I’m a diplomat. The most challenging part was being away from my fiance when I first moved. Actually, we were in an LDR even before I moved, but it was a 6-8 hour flight versus an 18 hour one. We got married about 6 months after I moved, then he came to join me. It is challenging watching him struggle to establish his life in a country where he doesn’t know anyone and doesn’t speak the language. I work in a male-dominated field and so, normally it’s the women/wives who are trying to get accustomed while their husbands do their fancy, important work. And even then, they normally have kids to raise, which occupies much of their time. My husband’s situation is not very common and I worry that he spends much of his day feeling bored or useless.

 

Post # 10
Member
115 posts
Blushing bee

I’m a lawyer in Australia. The visa process was relatively easy as my FI is Australian. I’m quite happy living in Australia but if he didn’t have his whole career here at the moment, I wouldn’t choose to live here. Hence, the most challenging things have been getting accustomed to the culture and also getting licensed to work here as I did my law degree in Europe.

Post # 11
Member
537 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

I’m a lawyer in Germany. Paperwork was a total pain in the butt, as was finding a job as a non-German qualified lawyer. 

Post # 12
Member
1327 posts
Bumble bee

I am a former expat; I’m Canadian and used to live in France and Spain.  I worked in communications.  I really, really miss being abroad, especially Spain because it’s my 2nd favourite place in the world and travelling was way cheaper!  I also love their culture.

I was offered a permanent job but declined because the starting salaries were way too low in my field, and I was up to my eyeballs in student loans.  Coming home was a good decision as I was making almost 3X what my offer salary was as soon as I came home, but man, do I ever miss it.  It’s a whole other kind of existence – I was as poor as a person could be without being homeless, but I was content and satisfied with much less.  I find that when you have the ability to afford some things, it makes you want everything and focus on things you can’t have, which is kind of sad.  As an impoverished young person in Europe, I couldn’t afford anything, basically, and so I especially appreciated anything extra that came my way, no matter how small.

Post # 13
Member
221 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

@dv3849:  That’s kind of cool though, forces you to travel around. I haven’t been to so many places in Ireland, I’m ashamed! I lived in limerick the first 6 months I was here, then I moved to Cork. Went to Dublin loads of times, a few times to Galway, and a few other cities, but I’ve only been to the North once (Giants’ Causeways), so that’s on my list. How is LImerick your favorite city?! Cork is a lot better Smile

Post # 14
Member
67 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: November 2014

I’ve been living and working in Haiti for 3 years now. Adjusting to irregular electricity, crazy driving and having to buy water trucks (to supply water to my apartment) have been adjustments (not quite as stressful as it may sound all the time, but still an adjustment). But it’s a gorgeous and hospitable place and I love it. 

Right now the hardest thing is the thought of having to be away from my FI until our wedding in November if I can’t find a job by next month…sigh. 

Post # 15
Member
1040 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

I’m Irish, and live and work in Australia. I work as a doctor as does my FI which is still relatively in demand so that helped when finding a job, but the paperwork between medical council registration and visas was still pretty ridiculous. We were lucky though, our Irish degrees were recognised which meant we didn’t need to do additional exams. 

One of the hardest things for my FI was having to put his career on hold for a year or two. He couldn’t get onto a training scheme until he had had a years supervised practice and then applied for permanent residency so that’s been frustrating for him. But I keep reminding him it’s unlikely his career would have progressed in Ireland regardless. 

Being away from family has been very tough too. My MIL was diagnosed with cancer which had spread to her brain shortly before we left. We debated cancelling the move but she told us she wanted to see us go and be happy.  She died 3 months later and I know my fiancé still wonders if he did the right thing. On a happier note my little sister had a baby a year ago and I’ve only got to see my nephew once – but I do get to see daily pics of him on Facebook!

 

You definitely miss the little things – for me it’s marks and Spencer’s and Lyons tea. But overall we’re much happier here. The working conditions for Irish doctors are ridiculously bad – we were working 36 hour shifts, about 60-80 hours per week (FI once did 129 hours – just madness). It got to the point where we used to wish for a minor car accident or semi serious illness just so we could get out of work, and I know that other Irish doctors have felt the same way. Here in Oz our hours are far less, our pay is better and we actually feel valued! And that had made it worth it. 

Post # 16
Member
451 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

Yes, I moved to the UK more than 8 years ago for university. I met my FI during my studies.

I work in customer service whilst studying to be an accountant (getting the accountancy experience I need through volunteer work).

I don’t need a visa because of the European Union, so I’ve never experienced any issues regarding entry into the UK or anything like that. My transition to settling here permanently has been very smooth.

I visit my home country several times per year, and my friends and family visit me (it’s about 90-100 minutes by airplane, and I can usually find cheap flight tickets).

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