Do you work with animals?

posted 6 months ago in Career
Post # 2
Member
1341 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2017

My office is dog friendly, and it’s the best!  They’re such natural stress-relievers.  It’s great for my dog too, lots of socialization instead of sitting at home.  I would love to actually work hands on with dogs!

Post # 3
Member
2441 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2017

I did… it wasnt glamarous, lots of cleaning up bodily fluids and little yappy dogs crying all day drive you insane after a while, at first you feel a bit sorry for them but it gets old quick (no other animals ever cried just toy/lap dogs with their high pitch howls and yaps and they dont stop they just keep going until the owners come back)

it depends on the animal though, some are much easier than others

Post # 5
Member
1341 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2017

daxsymbiote :  I’m in marketing for a liquor company – we’re pretty casual!

Post # 6
Member
185 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: November 2016

I have a biology degree and interned in animal care at a major zoo. It was amazing to work with so many different animals, but I hated the “business” side of it- I just couldn’t get on board with anything that didn’t put the animals first 100% of the time (and unfortunately those decisions come up, with budgets and general human lameness and such). I realized I was better suited to volunteering with animals and finding a different career in the long run. I have a ton of respect for the people who stick it out day after day to help the animals though! 

Post # 7
Member
333 posts
Helper bee

I worked on and off in veterinary while I studied my current field and grew my business. It was amazing and I miss it every day. I had to quit because my business got too busy. Now I work from home so I’m surrounded by my three cats and one golden retriever. 🙂

Post # 8
Member
6357 posts
Bee Keeper

Are you asking as you want a job where you can take a dog to work with you or are you asking about working with animals directly?

i work for an animal welfare charity. There are ‘hands on’ jobs of course but theres huge scope to be involved whatever your expertise, finance, marketing, HR, public affairs, event management etc. 

Post # 9
Member
1872 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2016

daxsymbiote :  it really depends on what you mean by “working with animals”. You commented above to the PP, that bringing your dog to work would be awesome. 

However, you ignored the pp about being around bodily fluids and loud noises. ALL pets can be loud, not just the little dogs. Also, you’ll have ringing phones and beeping pumps. 

If you’re thinking the Veterinary field, this is not playing with puppies and kittens all day. It’s placing IV lines in a crashing family member, it’s standing for 10- 12 hours as you work through the 6 set surgeries of the day and now the 2 added emergency surgeries. It’s getting in at 6am to work till 7pm, get home at 8pm an get called back in because there is an emergency. It’s catching a nap in a kennel because it’s only 2 hours till your next shift and home is 30 minutes away, or an hour away, and all you want is a few hours of sleep before that next shift….if you work in an emergency hospital.

Your dog might be able to come to work, but many Vet hospitals do not allow this. Bringing your own dog is mainly so that you can work overtime, since turn over is high. Many RVT/CVT/LVT, this is the equivalent to an RN in human med, are working 10-15 hour days. You also need to have your degree (2-4 years of schooling) and be licensed within your state. This is a 4 hour exam if VTNE only, or can be up to an 8 hour exam depending on your state and state exam. 

Now, if your talking DVM, that’s even more schooling- think med school. 

Also, the Veterinary field does not pay as much as the human field. The length of schooling is the same, student loan debt is the same, but pay is not. 

For example, this ranges by state/region of course, and cost of living. But AFTER schooling/debt, a DVM out of college is making ~ 50k, if they have specialized this is higher. However, this also means they have done an internship (usually not paid or very low pay) and then a residency BEFORE sitting for another exam. Then they have a full time job… 

RVT/LVT/CVT are making 30k out of school, then struggling to get raises for the rest of this career. I believe an RN can make 50k out of school. 

If your looking for a job to bring your own dog to to sit right by you, this is not Vet med. Your looking for marketing or another area. 

What schooling/degree do you have?

 

Post # 10
Member
1827 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2016 - Gorse Hill, Surrey, UK

I was a dog groomer for a year, loved training and learning the skills to do the job, but it was stressful as you were always under pressure to get grooms done on time. This was especially challenging if you had a dog that wanted to misbahave or worse bite you. Owners could be very fussy about the style too. Over all I really did enjoy it 80% of the time, I loved being so hands on with dogs and being able to gain their trust if they were nervous etc. I worked with so many lovely natured dogs, and even the ones who were agressive it was lovely to seem them improve over time when you put the work into it. The only reason I quit was the pay was awful and you barely ever get the breaks you should. I think for a job where you have to learn a manual skill should be paid far more than it was. It’s such a shame really but I’m in a far less stressful environment as I don’t feel responsible for someone elses pet every day, and I’m getting paid a ton more! I’m also getting to spend more quality time with my own dog now and thats enough for me 🙂

Post # 11
Member
1827 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2016 - Gorse Hill, Surrey, UK

I also wanted to add that its the most physically demanding and exhausting job I have ever had, but it kept the weight off!

Post # 12
Member
35 posts
Newbee

It really depends on what aspect of the industry you’re looking at getting into. By the only reply you’ve given, it seems you more so want a work place that will allow you to bring your dog to work, as opposed to working in the industry.

I work at a pet supply shop; only animals we sell are fish and hemrit crabs and we have rescue animals from one of the major animal rescues in Australia. We allow and encourage customers to bring in animals if they are restrained properly; dogs on leashes, cats in cages or leash, birds in cages or trained to sit on shoulder etc.. It’s great being able to watch a puppy or kitten grow up and always fantastic when you have great, frequent customers. But it has it’s downsides too, PPs have stated; it’s messy, you spend a lot of time cleaning up bodily fluids and it can be a struggle when the business aspect isn’t what’s best for the animal. The other downside I have to deal with while dealing with the public/customers, is when they aren’t looking after the best interest of the animal. It took me a while to learn that the best I can do, is give them the correct information and hope they take it on board.

Late last year, I opened up my own small animal resuce group, which my husband and I run from our home, rescuing (mainly) cats and kittens, getting them to health, checked by our vet, desexed, vaccinated and then adopted to appriopriate homes. 

I’m currently also studying to further my career in the animal industry in the hopes of opening up my own business. It’s hard work, but worthwile. Perhaps volunteering would give you an insider as to where you want to go. 

Post # 15
Member
718 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2017

I am a licensed vet tech; I worked in private practice (mostly dog/cat) for about 6 years during school and after graduation, then took a better paying job in a different area of veterinary medicine.  I’ve been here about 2.5 years but I’m seriously considering going back to practice because I miss it.  I’d like to have more time to volunteer at a shelter or be home more to foster for a rescue group, but my current job just doesn’t allow for that time-wise.

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