Breed vs personality discussion

posted 1 year ago in Pets
Member
2158 posts
Buzzing bee

As far as blue pits being more aggressive, I would pin that more on poor breeding practices: people sacrificing temperament and good breeding practices, as well as heavy inbreeding, in order to achieve a “rare” and/or “desireable” color.  

But I have heard for years, from people who own, breed, and work with Huskies that while Huskies have a tendency to run off/roam, the reds tend to be a little more laid back and more likely to stay at home.  I am not sure if this is more than an old wives’ tale, but it certainly would point to there being some correlation between color and temperament in this case.  

Member
5755 posts
Bee Keeper

I’ve always been of the mind that the breed will only get you so far, the rest is up to the owner….and while certain breeds were in fact created with a rather volatile or even dangerous purpose in this life, the fact is that under the correct care and with the proper attention, they live happy lives without ever causing anyone a problem.

That being said, in my personal experience, I never met a chow that didn’t just scare the hell outta me…what is the DEAl with those things?

Member
252 posts
Helper bee

I think certain breeds have predispositions to certain temperments. Every golden retriever I’ve ever met except for one has been sweet, friendly, enthusiastic and super loving. The only one that wasn’t had been abused before being rescued. He was still a nice boy, just rather scared of strangers and generally anxious (poor baby!). On the other side of the coin, I’ve heard a lot of stories on the news about pit bulls, chows, rottweilers, etc. attacking someone. The only pit bull I’ve ever met in real life was just as sweet as my parent’s golden! She had obviously been raised in a loving environment. Honestly, breed probably has some effect, but I think there can be more difference in temperament between two dogs of the same breed than different breeds. Environment and discipline make the most impact on a dog’s temperament.

@Nona99:  I don’t really get chows either! I love just about any dog, but there’s something a little off with chows IMO.

Member
1473 posts
Bumble bee

@Nona99:  We had a chow when I was a kid and he was loved, babied, pampered, you name it. One day I was minding my own damn 6 year old business and he attacked me out of nowhere – I still have a scar above by eyebrow and below my bottom lip!

As far as other breeds that get a bad rap, I have fostered a pit bull who was the sweetest girl ever. I also fostered a german shepherd who was awesome. I’ve been a lifelong doberman momma, and while they are extremely leery of strangers who just pop into our yard once we welcome the person they accept it and are calm.

Working in an ER I see a lot of dog bites. The most common offenders? Poodles, cocker spaniels, chihuahuas, and dalmatians. I’ve seen a pit bite twice and I’ve got reason to believe the people who were bitten were fighting them.

Member
2627 posts
Sugar bee

breeding and raising of an animal can mean a lot. you can have viscious “nice dogs” and nice “viscious dogs”

However I think in regards to pits there is a reason for their reputation. People have breed them to be fighters which means the best fighters survived and have continuted to breed whether in  a pet or fighting capacity (darwinian theory at work here- rescues who have survived, etc)

The reason they were chosen to fight is because of their natural behaviors. They arent “meaner” but they fight more deadly. They bite to kill. they do not show anger or frustration until its too late so you cant predict them (unlike other breeds who will growl or back up or show teeth). 

So when they attack, its done. Yes poodles are the most biting breed, but they dont bite to kill. They bite to warn. That is the difference.

As with any breed you can find anecdotes of great and bad dogs. But I do have to say I only know two people with pits. Both have had many for years. In the last 4 years they have had to put one down each because after years the dogs seemingly “randomly” attacked their other pits. One person had had it for 5 years, the other 8 years. They had lived with the other dogs for years so it was not a new introduction. 

From the ASPCA

 Bites delivered during a fight are typically inhibited because the point is to cause pain but not necessarily to inflict serious injuries. Pit bulls have been bred to behave differently during a fight. They may not give warning before becoming aggressive, and they’re less likely to back down when clashing with an opponent. When provoked, they may become aggressive more readily than another breed might. Sometimes they don’t inhibit their bites, so they may cause injury more often than other dogs.

http://www.aspca.org/Pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/dog-articles/the-truth-about-pit-bulls

So its a combination of breeding, raising, genetics etc. 

Member
1133 posts
Bumble bee

@ThreeMeers:  “they do not show anger or frustration until its too late so you cant predict them (unlike other breeds who will growl or back up or show teeth). “

This just isnt true. You may have only known 2 pits, I own one and know AT LEAST 10 others. This is just not true. 

Neither is the “they bite to kill” thing you mentioned. 

Member
2803 posts
Sugar bee

@Nona99:  Chows were originally bred to guard Chinese Temples. They are not a forthcoming breed. They keep to themselves. Aloof is the word to discribe them.

I had one living next door to me, and honest to god, I could NOT make friends with that dog. They just are not wiggly happy dogs. He was such a contrast fromt he silly lunkhead lab who had lived there before who could barely contain himwlef with excitment when we talked to him.

My impression is that they are not very bright, but that’s just me, I don’t have real evidence.

Member
7821 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

I have always prefered certain breeds (bird dogs) because I have only had good experiences with them, but I have also loved many random dogs that I have worked with- a bloodhound, a tiny poodle (He was so smart!  He was like a person!), a corgi named “Corgi.”  There are certain breeds I only had bad experiences with unfortunately (huskies at the kennel just never listened to me) and the mastiffs were so large it was difficult to control them (but who knows what the owners were like and if they were properly trained).  My friend raised Shar Peis and she said every single one was different – temperment/ personality-wise.  I don’t know.  I think I will never own an aggressive breed, personally- I just really love my bird dogs (labs, spaniels, pointers…)

eta:  Yeah.. chows are known to be the most dangerous dog… at least they were when I was working with dogs.  I had a really bad experience with an Akita that this guy I knew rescued- basically- it tried to eat my face.  :/

Member
2941 posts
Sugar bee

I had a chow border collie mix and he was a strange boy. I loved him to death, but aloof is the perfect way to describe him. He was incredibly easy to train, fiercely loyal but did not connect with other dogs or people. He was a one person kind of dog. 

I now have a pitty mix and he has the sweetest soul. He loves to hug and kiss and be held like a 65lb baby. That said, I never ever leave him alone with my 7 yr old nephew. Ever. He growled at a kid who got in his face once and since then not a single child has been allowed to pet him. Do I think he’s going to bite a kid? No. Do I want to find out? No. He has absolutely zero opportunity. To me, I’m being a responsible dog owner. I also live in a semi-sketchy neighborhood, so it’s best to let people believe he’s tough :)

gratuitous dog baby pic:

Member
1088 posts
Bumble bee

I have heard so much about Yorkies being “hyper” and “yippers” but my little puppy is neither of those things. I’ve had him over a year. He barks occasionally, but not often. And he sleeps more than I thought was possible for any mammal. He loves to play and go on walks, but he is by no means hyper. In fact, I’d say he is down right lazy. some breed stereotypes may ring true, but not in my personal experience.

Member
1088 posts
Bumble bee

@ThreeMeers:  I heard a story on NPR that said that Pits aren’t actually more aggressive/prone to biting than any other species, it’s just that they are all muscle. Their jaws are stronger, so when they do bite, it causes more damage. Therefore, people are a lot more likely to report a pitbull bite, where they might not report a bite from another breed with a weaker jaw.

Member
2627 posts
Sugar bee

@Tangled:  I agree. I didnt say they are more prone to biting, they just do more damage. Actually poodles tend to be the most biting breed. I said “Yes poodles are the most biting breed”

@FauxPas2012:  Per the ASPCA “pit bulls have been bred to behave differently during a fight. They may not give warning before becoming aggressive, and they’re less likely to back down when clashing with an oppon


Member
2158 posts
Buzzing bee

@ThreeMeers:  In the last 4 years they have had to put one down each because after years the dogs seemingly “randomly” attacked their other pits. One person had had it for 5 years, the other 8 years. They had lived with the other dogs for years so it was not a new introduction. 

Pitbulls were bred for DOG aggression.  Aggression towards dogs or other animals is not the same as aggression against people. 

Per the ASPCA “pit bulls have been bred to behave differently during a fight. They may not give warning before becoming aggressive, and they’re less likely to back down when clashing with an oppon

They are terriers first and foremost…like any terrier, they don’t back down easily.  As to the other, I have NEVER heard that they “may not give warning before becoming aggressive” and would be interested in knowing where the ASPCA gets that information, or what they base that statement on.

Historically, these dogs were bred to fight.  If you get in a ring with two dogs that are trying to hurt or even kill each other, it can be incredibly dangerous.  You wanted a dog who was not aggresive towards humans.  

They are dogs that were known for their stable temperament…they were considered “nanny dogs” because of their reliablity with children.

Nowadays, they have suffered from bad press, breed misidentification, and mostly, from bad breeding.  People breeding these dogs to fight don’t give a damn if they are aggressive to people or not…in many cases, it’s better if they ARE aggressive to people, because they offer protection, (the people fighting these dogs are not usually classy people, and are often involved in other illegal activities) and lend to a “bad-ass image.”  Even dogs not being bred to fight can suffer from bad breeding practices.  This is why it is so important to research breeders throughly and support only responsible breeding practices in ANY breed.

Member
2627 posts
Sugar bee

@Miss Apricot:  I get what you are saying, but breed a line long enough and you get characteristics that are hard to deal with

These are for pitbull sites http://www.pitbulllovers.com/two-pit-bulls-is-a-bad-idea.html

Pit Bulls on a whole can be dog aggressive and while this is perfectly normal, why invite the possibility of long term trouble into your home?

In the end, it’s difficult to raise one Pit Bull to be a well behaved, loved, healthy member of your family.

By adding another dog to your family you are also putting more strain on them and your current dog.

I always have said Pit Bulls are like Tattoos. Once you get one, you have this undying urge to get another.”

http://www.pitbulls.org/article/dog-aggression-pit-bulls

Dog aggression is a common issue in pit bulls. In fact, the UKC’s official breed standard for the American Pit Bull Terrier states that “most APBTs exhibit some level of dog aggression.”

Many pit bull puppies are social butterflies, but this frequently begins to change–often to the great surprise of novice owners who prided themselves on their dog-friendly pit bull–as the dog reaches social maturity around age two, though it can happen as early as eight months or as late as three years. Knowing this, you may wonder if there’s anything you can do to increase the chances that your pit bull puppy will remain dog-friendly as an adult.”


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