Dog advice please

posted 2 years ago in Pets
Post # 2
Member
2419 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

Have you considered that moving has unsettled him? Only animals like routine and can take a while to settle in a new home. I’d also be cautious about crating him if it is causing distress because he really won’t associate not pooping outside with being put in his crate inside.

I’d be inclined to treat him a bit like a puppy again and try and train him to poop on command. If this means longer walks or more time outside it’ll pay off if you can get him back on track. 

Post # 3
Member
330 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

does he always go in the same spot? I read somewhere that if you sprinkle pepper down it smells bad to them and it deters them from peeing. It does work for that I’ve used it before. I just don’t know if it works for pooping.

Post # 3
Member
6279 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2013

we sleep with our bedroom door closed because if we leave the door open, the dog will get into stuff around the house and pee in random places.  being confined in our bedroom, he typically stays in his own bed. 

we also crate our dog when we are not home.

Post # 5
Member
5222 posts
Bee Keeper

Well, if your know your dogs general routine [ which it sounds like you do] and he/she isn’t taking the cues you’re giving, my first suggestion it to go to the vet just to make sure everything is OK.

If everything checks out, here are a couple of things we did that helped after we moved:

1) I would leash my dog in the house with me until he got used to the idea that he NEEDED me to let him out to go pee or poop. Even at night, I would leash him next to the bed so if he needed to go, he would let me know instead of sneaking off to go poop in the corner ( he liked the same corner for doing his business). After a little while of this he figured out we meant business and he didn’t have any interest of pooping in his bed, so that broke the habit

2) Feeding a very small amount in the morning, and then giving the rest of the food in the early afternoon (if possible) so that his cycle  changed every so slightly to make him go when I first take him out of the crate in the afternoon. It took a few days, but eventually he went from needing to go late ( like 7-9 pm) to around 3-5 pm…. then I could take him out one final time before bed so he could get anything else out that needed to go!

 

3) use puppy pads if you have to just for the added benefit of having something down in his usual poop spot. You can then gradually move the mat closer to the door so that he associates it with going outside. 

Post # 6
Member
4441 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: January 2013 - Harbourfront Grand Hall

a_day_at_the_fair:  Have you taken him to the vet to rule out a medical issue?  The only time my dog has gone in the house is when he’s stressed (just moved into our house) or sick with a bacterial infection.  If you rule out a medical issue I would find a retraining program and treat him mlike a puppy who’s just being potty trained!

Post # 7
Member
302 posts
Helper bee

Wow, that sounds very frustrating! I’m sorry you’re back on poop police duty even after you’ve housebroken your dog. When he whines and seems distressed in his crate have you tried to take him out then? Maybe he’s distressed because he has to go? I agree that he won’t be able to associate the crate with not pooping at night, but I’m not sure what to suggest. Maybe try putting his bed in the crate and keeping it in your room and then having that be his new routine? Is his crate separated from your sleeping quarters? maybe he’s stressed at the separation? I defintely thing talking to a vet/trainer might help because they might have more canine insight than me! 

Post # 10
Member
5222 posts
Bee Keeper

a_day_at_the_fair:  Yeah, that would be frustrating. Try leashing him next to you at night instead of allowing him to roam. I make sure mine has plenty of room and access to me, but it is highly unlikely he will poop in his bed where he knows he has to sleep, so he will try and wake you up. It may not work, but it’s worth a shot so that he knows that you’ve established a new boundary in the house and he isn’t allowed to break the rules just because it is a new place. 

Post # 12
Member
1262 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: February 2015 - Mount Hermon

a_day_at_the_fair:  when we’re potty training a puppy, we take them out and if they don’t go, they go in the kennel. 10-20 minutes later (whenever they’re not whining, because one does not get rewarded for whining. Ever.) we try again. And when they do we practically throw a party with treats, playtime, and other rewards. Yeah, they scream. But they learn quick that when mom says to pee, you go. 

Post # 13
Member
1298 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2012

a_day_at_the_fair:  do you feed him at regular times during the day? If so, you could try and get him on a schedule of pooping after he eats – dogs (and humans) have something called the gastro-colic reflex – basically the body tells the brain it needs to poop bc you just put more food in the belly, time to move things through …

so if you feed him his evening meal, try taking him out to poop about 10-20 minutes later. Might help to do rewards after he poops as pp said. That way he gets used to that schedule. 

 

Post # 14
Member
558 posts
Busy bee

a_day_at_the_fair:  This is frustrating, and this is going to sound more frustrating! First do not make a fuss at all in any way when he has an accident in the house. Clean it, preferably when he is not around, with non-ammonia based cleaner. You may want to mix a little Vanilla essence with water in a spray bottle and mist it over the spot to 1) neutralize the odor and 2) dissuade him/her form that spot. Remember how ‘they’ say any advertising is good advertising? Now to a dog any attention is good attention, so even if the retort to his actions is negative at least it’s something. Is it possible that the households evening routine changed in any way since moving to the new house? The slightest change could result in less attention and he might react in a way to entice reaction from you. One member of the household might now have a greater traveling distance to and from work; hypothetically, this will result in less time spent at home. That results in behavioral changes in your dog in order for him/her to find a balance to what he/she is use to and what is happening currently. As this behavior only presents its self at night, please consider taking some time sit back relax and think what the routine was and what it is now, if there has been any changes that resulted in less attention you might want to consider introducing a special moment every evening for him/her – some one on one ‘Rover and mommy/daddy’ time. In conjunction with that a very healthy way of feeding dried dog cubes/kibbles is 2/3 of the daily allowance in the morning and 1/3 in the evening. I do agree that you should rule out any potential medical condition/s with your vet. Finally, back to basics, take your dog out very frequently in the evenings try as often as half hourly to hourly (you may gradually reduce this time as you pic-up on his/her routine) and every time he/she eliminates wait until he/she is completely finished (do not interrupt) then praise and treat. The treat may be a small bit of food or a quick game with a favorite toy, you should have this reward ready immediately after your dog eliminated. The secret to this is patients, consistency and time. Hope this helps…

Post # 15
Member
2428 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

Is it an option for you to leave him in the yard until he poops? That could mean a long time, but once he does poop you can let him back in and he should reassociate that it’s not okay go to in the house. Or walk him until he poops, even if it’s a while. That’s a really frustrating situation and I hope you find something that works!

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